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Amsterdam Speechwriters Conference 2014 Talk

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A talk given at Amsterdam Speechwriters & Business Communicators Conference in October 2014.

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Amsterdam Speechwriters Conference 2014 Talk

  1. 1. This slide was intentionally left blank
  2. 2. Slides: 
 the love 
 (and hate) 
 of my life — Alexei Kapterev —
  3. 3. ISLIDES
  4. 4. – Jessica Hische FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE THE WORK YOU DO W H I L E Y O U YO U S H O U L D B E D O I N G IS PROBABLY THE WORK P rocrastinate
  5. 5. HATE LOVE
  6. 6. Do we
 
 slides? NEED
  7. 7. 
 TIMES SOME
  8. 8. S L I D E S C R E A T E A M U C H ATMOSPHERE (compared to reading, that is) Less formal
  9. 9. WHAT TO SAY REMIND YOU Slides
  10. 10. WHAT TO SAY REMIND YOU Slides CONSTRAINT WITHOUT TOO MUCH
  11. 11. BUT
  12. 12. OUT OF PLACE COULD BE Slides
  13. 13. 
 TIMES SOME Slides are great
  14. 14. G R E A T Slides FOR THAT ARE
  15. 15. TECHNOLOGY ARE Slides
  16. 16. Technology is neither good 
 nor bad; nor 
 is it neutral. — Melvin Kranzberg
  17. 17. ENHANCE C A N your presentation Slides
  18. 18. OR
  19. 19. They could RUIN IT T O T A L L Y
  20. 20. DIFFERENCE? What makes a
  21. 21. WHAT’S THE BIG PROBLEM WITH SLIDES?
  22. 22. PowerPoint® Presentation 
 Flaws and Failures: 
 A Psychological Analysis (2012) Stephen M. Kosslyn, 
 Rogier A. Kievit, 
 Alexandra G. Russell, 
 and Jennifer M. Shephard
  23. 23. Not enough information was provided to support the main point Went through the presentation too slowly Read word-for-word from notes or from the slides themselves Slides contained too much material to absorb before the next slide was presented The main point was obscured by lots of irrelevant detail 5. 4. 3. 2. 1. THE TOP 5 PROBLEMS
  24. 24. WHAT’S THE BIG PROBLEM WITH SLIDES?
  25. 25. TOO MUCH TEXT! It’s
  26. 26. ?SOLUTION The
  27. 27. SIMPLE SLIDES!
  28. 28. SIMPLE SLIDES are not the solution
  29. 29. YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT TO SAY! P roblem No1:
  30. 30. 4 TEDsters rehearse times
  31. 31. NOT ENOUGH TEXT Not a problem for the audience
  32. 32. HUGEP roblem for the speaker NOT ENOUGH TEXT Not a problem for the audience *
  33. 33. THE STEVE JOBS WAY?
  34. 34. The most striking thing about the 17-inch PowerBook, after the screen itself, is how brilliantly Apple managed to shrink the size of the machine built around that big display. —Walt Mossberg, theWall Street Journal Sure, the PowerBook is an unusually wide 15.4 inches, but it is only one inch thick.Yet, it feels solid as a rock. It is just 10.2 inches deep and weighs only 6.8 pounds. To get an idea of how sleek those dimensions are, compare the new PowerBook with another brand-new laptop, Dell’s Latitude D800. This model also boasts a widescreen display, measuring 15.4 inches diagonally. But, even though the Dell has a significantly smaller screen, it looks like a whale next to the 17-inch PowerBook.
  35. 35. P roblem No2: CREDIBILITY
  36. 36. CREDIBILITYwith a sophisticated audience More complex slides add
  37. 37. As soon as they can read children trust written text more than spoken information. Corriveau et al. “To the letter: Early readers trust 
 print–based over oral instructions to guide their actions” 
 British Journal of Developmental Psychology (2014)
  38. 38. SIMPLE SLIDES are not the solution
  39. 39. is not the problem TOO MUCH TEXT
  40. 40. THE TOP 5 PROBLEMS 5. 4. 3. 2. 1. Not enough information was provided to support the main point Went through the presentation too slowly Read word-for-word from notes or from the slides themselves Slides contained too much material to absorb before the next slide was presented The main point was obscured by lots of irrelevant detail
  41. 41. TOO 
 MUCH NOT 
 ENOUGH 
 Superficial Too nerdy THE OPTIMAL BALANCE
  42. 42. GREAT SPANS OF HISTORY THAT WERE OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH TOPICS OF LOGIC, GEOMETRY, MATHEMATICS, DEDUCTION, INDUCTION, AND NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. SOCRATES', PLATO'S AND ARISTOTLE'S IDEAS ABOUT TRUTH SEEN BY SOME AS CONSISTENT WITH CORRESPONDENCE THEORY. IN HIS METAPHYSICS, ARISTOTLE STATED: "TO OF WHAT IS THAT IT IS NOT, OR OF WHAT IS NOT THAT IT IS, IS FALSE, WHILE TO SAY OF WHAT IS THAT IT IS, AND WHAT IS NOT THAT IT IS NOT, IS TRUE".[54] THE STANFORD ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PHILOSOPHY PROCEEDS TO SAY O ARISTOTLE:"(...) ARISTOTLE SOUNDS MUCH MORE LIKE A GENUINE CORRESPONDENCE THEORIST IN THE CATEGOR (12B11, 14B14), WHERE HE TALKS OF "UNDERLYING THINGS" THAT MAKE STATEMENTS TRUE AND IMPLIES THAT T "THINGS" (PRAGMATA) ARE LOGICALLY STRUCTURED SITUATIONS OR FACTS (VIZ., HIS SITTING, HIS NOT SITTING). INFLUENTIAL IS HIS CLAIM IN DE INTERPRETATIONE (16A3) THAT THOUGHTS ARE "LIKENESSESS" (HOMOIOSIS) OF THINGS. ALTHOUGH HE NOWHERE DEFINES TRUTH IN TERMS OF A THOUGHT'S LIKENESS TO A THING OR FACT, IT IS CLEAR THAT SUCH A DEFINITION WOULD FIT WELL INTO HIS OVERALL PHILOSOPHY OF MIND. (…)"[54] VERY SIM STATEMENTS CAN ALSO BE FOUND IN PLATO (CRATYLUS 385B2, SOPHIST 263B).[54] IN HINDUISM, TRUTH IS DE AS "UNCHANGEABLE", "THAT WHICH HAS NO DISTORTION", "THAT WHICH IS BEYOND DISTINCTIONS OF TIME, SPA AND PERSON", "THAT WHICH PERVADES THE UNIVERSE IN ALL ITS CONSTANCY". THE HUMAN BODY, THEREFORE COMPLETELY TRUE AS IT CHANGES WITH TIME, FOR EXAMPLE. THERE ARE MANY REFERENCES, PROPERTIES AND EXPLANATIONS OF TRUTH BY HINDU SAGES THAT EXPLAIN VARIED FACETS OF TRUTH, SUCH AS THE NATIONAL MO INDIA: "SATYAMEVA JAYATE" (TRUTH ALONE WINS), AS WELL AS "SATYAM MUKTAYE" (TRUTH LIBERATES), "SATY 'PARAHIT'ARTHAM' VA'UNMANASO YATHA'RTHATVAM' SATYAM" (SATYA IS THE BENEVOLENT USE OF WORDS AND T MIND FOR THE WELFARE OF OTHERS OR IN OTHER WORDS RESPONSIBILITIES IS TRUTH TOO), "WHEN ONE IS FIRM ESTABLISHED IN SPEAKING TRUTH, THE FRUITS OF ACTION BECOME SUBSERVIENT TO HIM ( PATANJALI YOGASUTR SUTRA NUMBER 2.36 ), "THE FACE OF TRUTH IS COVERED BY A GOLDEN BOWL. UNVEIL IT, O PUSAN (SUN), SO TH WHO HAVE TRUTH AS MY DUTY (SATYADHARMA) MAY SEE IT!" (BRHADARANYAKA V 15 1-4 AND THE BRIEF IISA UPANISAD 15-18), TRUTH IS SUPERIOR TO SILENCE (MANUSMRITI), ETC. COMBINED WITH OTHER WORDS, SATYA A AS MODIFIER, LIKE "ULTRA" OR "HIGHEST," OR MORE LITERALLY "TRUEST," CONNOTING PURITY AND EXCELLENC There is no 
 such thing as “TOO MUCH TEXT”
  43. 43. for this audience TOO MUCH TEXT There is
  44. 44. • Greek majuscule 
 (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule • Roman majuscule 
 (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule • Carolingian majuscule 
 (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) • Gothic majuscule 
 (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules 4 eras in Western European writing 10
  45. 45. • Greek majuscule • Roman majuscule • Carolingian majuscule • Gothic majuscule 
 4 eras in Western European writing 30
  46. 46. 50
  47. 47. MAYBE TOO 
 MUCH MAYBE NOT 
 ENOUGH 

  48. 48. 1. Audience size 2. Their proficiency level 3. Need for handouts 4. Amount of time you have THINGS TO CONSIDER 4
  49. 49. Pictures are EXPENSIVEWHILE TEXT IS RELATIVELY CHEAP
  50. 50. MAYBE TOO 
 MUCH MAYBE NOT 
 ENOUGH 
 €€€ €€€
  51. 51. for one click TOO MUCH TEXT There is
  52. 52. • Greek majuscule 
 (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule • Roman majuscule 
 (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule • Carolingian majuscule 
 (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) • Gothic majuscule 
 (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules 4 eras in Western European writing
  53. 53. ✤ I’m not a fan of this effect ✤ or this effect ✤ or this effect ✤ OR THIS EFFECT ✤ this is more than enough Animation
  54. 54. with no structure TOO MUCH TEXT There is
  55. 55. •Greek majuscule (9th - 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. - 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule •Roman majuscule (7th century B.C. - 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th - 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule •Carolingian majuscule (4th - 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 - 12th century) •Gothic majuscule (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules. 4 eras in Western European writing
  56. 56. • Greek majuscule 
 (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule • Roman majuscule 
 (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule • Carolingian majuscule 
 (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) • Gothic majuscule 
 (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules 4 eras in Western European writing
  57. 57. •Greek majuscule (9th - 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. - 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule •Roman majuscule (7th century B.C. - 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th - 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule •Carolingian majuscule (4th - 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 - 12th century) •Gothic majuscule (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules. 4 eras in Western European writing
  58. 58. •Greek majuscule (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule •Roman majuscule (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule •Carolingian majuscule (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) •Gothic majuscule (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules. 4 eras in Western 
 European writing
  59. 59. • Greek majuscule (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule • Roman majuscule (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule • Carolingian majuscule (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) • Gothic majuscule (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules. 4 eras in Western 
 European writing
  60. 60. • Greek majuscule (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule • Roman majuscule (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule • Carolingian majuscule (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) • Gothic majuscule (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules. 4 eras in Western European writing
  61. 61. • Greek majuscule (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule • Roman majuscule (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule • Carolingian majuscule (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) • Gothic majuscule (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules. 4 eras in Western European writing
  62. 62. • Greek majuscule 
 (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule • Roman majuscule 
 (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule • Carolingian majuscule 
 (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) • Gothic majuscule 
 (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules 4 eras in Western European writing
  63. 63. • Greek majuscule 
 (9th – 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. – 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule • Roman majuscule 
 (7th century B.C. – 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th – 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule • Carolingian majuscule 
 (4th – 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 – 12th century) • Gothic majuscule 
 (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules 4 eras in Western European writing
  64. 64. •Greek majuscule (9th - 3rd century B.C.) in contrast to the Greek uncial script (3rd century B.C. - 12 century A.D.) and the later Greek minuscule •Roman majuscule (7th century B.C. - 4th century A.D.) in contrast to the Roman uncial (4th - 8th century B.C.), Roman Half Uncial, and minuscule •Carolingian majuscule (4th - 8th century A.D.) in contrast to the Carolingian minuscule (around 780 - 12th century) •Gothic majuscule (13th and 14th century), in contrast to the early Gothic (end of 11th to 13th century), Gothic (14th century), and late Gothic (16th century) minuscules. 4 eras in Western European writing
  65. 65. BIGIMPORTANT SMALLLESS IMPORTANT
  66. 66. 10/21/14 TechInvestLab.com 2 Угроза Digital Divide Для работы ему необходима физическая инфраструктура (провода, каналы радиосвязи). Задачу удвоения физической инфраструктуры невозможно осуществить без масштабной реформы связи как инфраструктурной отрасли. Интернет – это протокол Что такое Digital Divide Угроза отставания в области информационных технологий усугубляет общее отставание страны от мировых лидеров (Саммит G8, 2000 год). Количество пользователей В России доступ к Интернет имеют около 10% населения, а в соседней Финляндии – более 50% Одна из целей программы «Электронная Россия» — удвоение количества пользователей Интернета в стране. 10
  67. 67. 1. Context: How many? Who are they? 2. Priorities: What’s most important? 3. Visual cues: Size, colours, etc 4. Animation (if necessary) MANAGING LOTS OF TEXT
  68. 68. One more EXAMPLEAND I’M DONE
  69. 69. INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY
  70. 70. INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY
  71. 71. INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY
  72. 72. INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY
  73. 73. Data & Research Analysis Library HR Finance Archive Procurement Investor support Investment Promotion Licensing RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION INVESTMENT Administrative 
 assistant Advisor CEO INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY
  74. 74. Data & Research Analysis Library HR Finance Archive Procurement Investor support Investment Promotion Licensing RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION INVESTMENT Administrative 
 assistant Advisor CEO INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY
  75. 75. RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION INVESTMENT CEO INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY
  76. 76. RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION INVESTMENT CEO INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY
  77. 77. RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION INVESTMENT Data & 
 Research Analysis Library HR Finance Archive Procurement Investor 
 support Investment Promotion Licensing INVESTMENT SUPPORT AGENCY CEOAdministrative 
 assistant Advisor
  78. 78. MAYBE TOO 
 MUCH MAYBE NOT 
 ENOUGH 

  79. 79. Large 
 audience Small audience THE OPTIMAL BALANCE MORE TEXT LITTLE TEXT
  80. 80. Do we
 
 slides? NEED
  81. 81. Yes
 S O M E T I M E S
  82. 82. A LOT OF TEXT? Can we have
  83. 83. CAN Yes we
  84. 84. CAN Yes we 
 SOMETIMES
  85. 85. Complex slides require DESIGNDESIGNDESIGN
  86. 86. FOOD & BEERFOOD & BEER W I L L for FOOD & BEER T O D A Y DESIGNDESIGNDESIGN
  87. 87. Thank you!W W W . K A P T E R E V . C O M

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