Networking & Elevator
Speeches
Networking 101
Expanding your circle of contacts for the purpose of
achieving more than you could on your own
Examples
Rules of Engagement
 Determine what you hope to achieve and whom






you’d like to meet
Dress appropriately for th...
Rules of Engagement Continued
 Talk less, listen more
 Focus on your goals and what you can do for others
 Be brief; ma...
Business Card
Social Networking
Rules of Engagement
 Display an appropriate
photo
 Fill your “specialties”
section under your
summary ...
Elevator Speech – What is it?
A thirty second speech
 Who you are/What you do
 What do you offer/Why you are a great can...
When?
Be prepared at any time
 Career & internship fairs
 Networking events
 In line at the grocery store, at church, a...
Elevator Speech
 Case
 Creativity
 Delivery
Samples (courtesy of Optimal Resume)
My name is Mary Anderson, and I’m seeking a fulltime position in IT support. For the ...
Samples
Hi, I am Jane Smith, and will be graduating in May
from Rock Valley College with a degree in nursing. My
goal sinc...
Creating Your Speech
 Who you are/What you do
 What do you offer/Why you are a great candidate
 How do you do it
 Call...
Writing Tips
Step 1: Write down your ideas

Step 2: Eliminate unnecessary words, making short,
strong, powerful sentences
...
Questions
 K.cooper@rockvalleycollege.edu

 815-921-4092
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Elevator speeches

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  • An elevator pitch is an overview of an idea, product, service, project, person, or other Solution and is designed to just get a conversation started. Overview - is to make sure the audience understands what you are talking about and what’s in it for them.
  • 1.Case—They have built solid persuasive cases, employing clean, logical arguments and evidence to support their messages.2.Creativity—Their illustrations of the talking points are really creative. They have blended thoughtful analysis and storyboarding to craft intriguing and interesting messages.3.Delivery—They present their messages in their own authentic voices. There’s no boring professional mode; they aren’t canned Stepford people. Their presentation style is genuine, and people sense the truth in their delivery. (It’s not just what you say but how you say it)
  • When initiating the conversation, open with a statement or question that grabs attention. Utilize a hook that prompts your listener to ask questions where you can then begin your elevator speech.
  • Elevator speeches

    1. 1. Networking & Elevator Speeches
    2. 2. Networking 101 Expanding your circle of contacts for the purpose of achieving more than you could on your own Examples
    3. 3. Rules of Engagement  Determine what you hope to achieve and whom      you’d like to meet Dress appropriately for the function Turn off your cell phone ringer & keep in pocket Wear your name tag on your right shoulder Make eye contact, smile, introduce yourself and give a firm handshake Ask questions, show interest, and be positive, friendly, and don’t criticize
    4. 4. Rules of Engagement Continued  Talk less, listen more  Focus on your goals and what you can do for others  Be brief; make your elevator speech specific and     interesting Devoting 8 to 10 minutes per person is acceptable so you can mingle Carry professional-looking business cards to exchange with others - Bump Be genuine, sincere, and respectful Follow up immediately on leads and new acquaintances
    5. 5. Business Card
    6. 6. Social Networking Rules of Engagement  Display an appropriate photo  Fill your “specialties” section under your summary with keywords  Show off your education  Have your profile filled out 100%  When connecting…
    7. 7. Elevator Speech – What is it? A thirty second speech  Who you are/What you do  What do you offer/Why you are a great candidate  How do you do it  Call for action
    8. 8. When? Be prepared at any time  Career & internship fairs  Networking events  In line at the grocery store, at church, at a sporting event, etc.
    9. 9. Elevator Speech  Case  Creativity  Delivery
    10. 10. Samples (courtesy of Optimal Resume) My name is Mary Anderson, and I’m seeking a fulltime position in IT support. For the past year I have worked part time in a technical support center, and have encountered just about every type of person or problem imaginable. I’ve realized that working with people and helping to solve their problems is what I’m best at and what I crave the most. I’m pursuing a certificate in Microsoft Server Administration at RVC at night to give me a broader technical skill set and to help improve my employer’s service levels.
    11. 11. Samples Hi, I am Jane Smith, and will be graduating in May from Rock Valley College with a degree in nursing. My goal since childhood has been to be a nurse. I often find myself caring for others in one way or another and empathizing with whatever they are going through. I’m currently working as a part-time lab assistant at Rockford Memorial, and I volunteer in their oncology unit as well. My eventual career goal is to work in pediatrics, preferably with cancer patients, but I’m open to other assignments as well, especially just beginning.
    12. 12. Creating Your Speech  Who you are/What you do  What do you offer/Why you are a great candidate  How do you do it  Call for action
    13. 13. Writing Tips Step 1: Write down your ideas Step 2: Eliminate unnecessary words, making short, strong, powerful sentences Step 3: Connect phrases to ensure a natural flow Step 4: Practice Step 5: Did you address what is in it for the listener? Step 6: Create unique versions for different situations
    14. 14. Questions  K.cooper@rockvalleycollege.edu  815-921-4092

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