SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 12
Download to read offline
1 
 
Government-sponsored Future Centres
as an alternative form of
democracy for good governance
Alan LUNG Ka‐lun, Path of Democracy 
 
Background and Introduction
Professor Tony Carty of the University of Hong  Kong pointed out at a speaker 
luncheon on 21 December 2009i
 that equal and universal suffrage on its own is an 
insufficient guarantee of true democracy. In the case of the UK and many other 
jurisdictions, low elector turnout often means that governments could be elected 
by as little as 25% of the registered voters. These governments do not have strong 
mandates. In the UK particularly, the commercial elite can succeed in subverting 
the main political parties (Labour and Conservatives) so that their agendas take 
precedence  over  that  of  the  people  in  general  and  "Functional  Constituencies" 
(FCs) are at work without formally enshrining FCs in UK's political systems.  
 
  Professor  Eliza  Lee  Wing‐yee  of  the  University  of  Hong  Kong  quoted  a 
survey  prepared  by  public  relations  agency  Edelman  in  February  2014:  "… 
Hongkonger's  trust  in  government  fell  18  points  to  45  per  cent  due  to  policy 
failure, legitimacy problems and scandal".ii
  In the case of Hong Kong, the "market 
imbalance" brought by the FCs in Hong Kong must be redressed, preferably by 
restoring  the  institutional  protections  against  malign  actions  enjoyed  by 
representative democracies: a free press, an autonomous civil service, powerful 
judiciaries and an alternative mechanism to link stakeholders in the community to 
the Government policy formulation process.  
 
 
On 7 January 2011, Mr. Lam Woon‐kwong, current Convener of the Non‐
executive  Members  of  the  Executive  Council,  shared  his  experience  on  civic 
engagement at a Hong Kong Democratic Foundation speaker luncheon where Mr. 
C.Y. Leung was present. As the speaker of the event, Mr. Lam shared a case study 
2 
 
where  he  commissioned  a  research  project  headed  by  Professor  Joseph  Chan 
Cho‐wai  of  the  University  of  Hong  Kong  on  prototyping  a  new  model  of  Civic 
Engagement  on  the  Kai  Tak  Planning  Study.iii   
All  the  requirements  of  the 
stakeholders  were  met  in  this  complex  and  difficult  urban  planning  exercise. 
However, the process had taken two and a half years to come up with the final 
"2006 Outline Zoning Plan for Kai Tak".  
 
  A  more  flexible  and  effective  method  is  needed  to  engage  the  general 
public in solving urgent and contentious social, economic and political issues such 
as: Copy Right Amendment, the Third Runway, Border Control of the Express Rail 
Link to Mainland China, and Land and Housing Development Policies. Other long‐
term but no less controversial issues include: Economic Development, Population 
Policy, Income Inequality and Retirement Protection. Of all the issues, the most 
difficult ones are taken up by Path of Democracy and the publisher of this book. 
These include: Mainland‐Hong Kong Relations under the Basic Law, One‐Country‐
Two‐Systems,  Preserving  Hong  Kong's  Rule  of  Law  and  How  to  Build  Political 
Consensus on Hong Kong's forthcoming Constitutional Reform. 
  
 
Some causes of policy failures in Hong Kong
  In 2003, research conducted by Prof.  Fernando Cheung Chiu‐hung of the 
Poly  University  of  Hong  Kong  iv
  found  that  the  mechanism  needed  to  forge 
consensus  and unity  amongst the  different sectors of the community is  largely 
missing. Hong Kong's "Advisory Committee System" which Hong Kong relies on is 
no  longer  performing  the  function  of  giving  useful  advice  to  the  HKSAR 
Government.  The  advisory  committees  are  often  captured  by  yes‐men  and 
inactive members who accept the Administration's view without questions. Many 
advisory committees, particularly the lower‐level ones, are unnecessary. There is 
a  widespread  culture  of  encouraging  members  to  agree  with  the  views  of 
administration.  Dissenting  opinions  and  difficult  questions  are  discouraged. 
Members  of  the  business  community  are  often  given  preference  in  the 
appointment  process.  Others,  particularly  the  activists  who  have  democratic 
affiliations, are excluded from the selection process.   
 
  In 2007, Professor Joseph Chan Cho‐wai of  The University of Hong Kong 
said  in  a  report  of  a  research  project  sponsored  by  the  Bauhinia  Foundation 
Research  Centre ‐‐ From Consultation to Civic Engagement: The Road to  Better 
Policy‐making and Governance in Hong Kong: “… the traditional mode of public 
3 
 
consultation has failed, but a new mode has yet to be established. The political 
and  social  ecology  of  Hong  Kong  has  changed  so  drastically  since  1997  that 
governing  through  an  advisory  system  and  conventional  public  consultation  no 
longer satisfies public expectations"v
.  
 
  In  2014,  Professor  Li  Pang‐kwong  commented  in  his  book  ‐‐  Governing 
Hong Kong: Insights from the British Declassified Files, "… Policy‐making in Hong 
Kong before 1997 was monopolized by ‘Home’ (U.K.) civil servants posted in Hong 
Kong. Local Chinese Administrative Officers were hired to execute policies, but not 
to formulate them. After the withdrawal of British rule after the handover, Hong 
Kong's entire governance system has failed to effectively adjust. This is why the 
HKSAR Government does not know how to make policies after 1997.” vi
   
 
  One may agree or disagree with Professor Li's observation, but it appears 
that Hong Kong has abandoned the Pre‐1997 practice of recruiting the more vocal 
activists into the political process to make them see the Government's viewpoint 
and, at the same time, make best use of their knowledge  and wisdom to  help 
solve difficult problems faced by the Government. Politics in Post‐1997 Hong Kong 
has certainly become complex and confrontational. Filibuster has been deployed 
more  and  more  often  in  the  Legislative  Council  to  delay  the  passage  of  some 
"undesired" legislation and budget approval. There is so far no perfect solution to 
end a destructive mood in politics, but irrational discussion can only be alleviated 
if governance and public trust in the HKSAR Government can be re‐established. 
 
The capacity to solve complex problems is missing
  Many deep rooted conflicts and problems in Hong Kong are waiting to be 
solved. Top of the list on the current HKSAR Government agenda are: exorbitant 
property prices,vii
 economic development, income inequality, poverty alleviation 
and how to care for an aging population. Such problems are universal and are not 
unique  to  Hong  Kong.  However,  the  capacity  to  solve  the  complex  problems 
facing Hong Kong seems to be missing.  
   
  Mr.  Lam  Woon‐kwong,  an  experienced  government  administrator  and 
Convener  of  the  Non‐official  Members  of  the  Executive  Council  of  the  HKSAR 
Government acknowledged that better policy making is demanded universally. He 
4 
 
also acknowledged that it is very difficult.viii
  In his view, most governments are 
conservative or they're at least staffed by conservative people ‐‐ the civil servants. 
The  result  is  that  this  breeds  a  "risk  averse"  culture,  particularly  when  civil 
servants are deeply involved in the policy formulation, decision making and the 
political  process.  According  to  Mr.  Lam,  while  civil  servants  often  position 
themselves as "politically neutral" and defender of public interests, all ideas from 
"outsiders" are unwelcomed intrusions which must be representative of special 
interest  groups  and  are  usually  resisted.  Mr.  Lam  went  on  to  explain  that  the 
typical way to handle policy making is to form a committee.  
 
  This  is  the  usual  risk‐averse  way  the  HKSAR  Government  uses  to  handle 
complex problem. Typically, decisions are based on the views of a very small circle 
that  may  not  have  reflected  their  opinions  in  the  advisory  committees.  These 
"Preconceived Answers" and final solutions implemented are often hidden in the 
small paragraphs of "Consultation Papers". 
 
  "Another problem with the civil service is that talents are almost entirely 
inbred:  the  "revolving  door"  being  very  difficult  to  implement.  With  a  fast‐
changing world, the Hong Kong civil service lacks specialist expertise, and even if 
some  officers  may  be  trained  to  handle  specialist  policy  areas,  they  lack  the 
capacity to handle the complex policy‐making process. So we end up lagging quite 
significantly  behind  in  areas  such  as  Information,  Innovation,  Technology  and 
Creative Industries," said Mr. Lam.  Soon after 1997, the permanent civil servants 
were  topped  with  a  layer  of  political  appointees.  Under  pressure,  the  HKSAR 
Government has no time for research and analysis. Policy makers often jump to 
ad hoc conclusions for "band‐aid" cure or short‐term solutions. It is easy for the 
media or the general public to point fingers at the Chief Executive and the Bureau 
Chiefs. The Asian Financial Crisis and uncooperative Legislative Council are often 
blamed.  Sadly,  the  truth  is  closer  to  the  fact  that  after  the  British  Hong  Kong 
Administration  left,  Hong  Kong  as  a  community  does  not  really  know  enough 
about policy making and the "Craft of Government" needed to run a "city" that 
has  the  GDP  of  a  medium  size  country  in  Europe.  The  experience,  the  subject 
5 
 
knowledge and the political acumen needed to lead the Hong Kong community 
forward seem to be sorely missing.      
 
Government-sponsored Future Centres in Europe 
 
  In a place as sophisticated, developed and liberal minded as Hong Kong, the 
Government must have the mediation skills and participate in the process to help 
opposing camps see the common goal. The Government must acquire the skills 
needed to lead the community to agree on a common set of objectives. Mr. Lam 
Woon  Kwong  pointed  out  that  "…  the  best  way  forward  is  to  leave  the 
engagement  process  open  and  empower  the  stakeholders  to  make  their  own 
rules  to  resolve  their  differences  through  organized  interaction,  guided  and 
arbitrated  hopefully  by  a  positive  and  trusted  player  at  the  helm".  But  if  the 
lesson has already been learned and the precedent for success is recorded, how 
did we end up in our present impasse? The problem is again complex but it boils 
down to the common syndrome: lack of genuine desire to be open, lack of will to 
engage the opposition and be seriously inclusive, lack of honesty to admit failures, 
and in the end lack of sincere commitment from the top. 
 
  Government‐sponsored  Future  Centre  is  a  proven  solution  in  many 
European  countries  to  gauge  public  views  and  develop  capacities  for  resolving 
complex issues in turbulent times. They facilitate better governance by providing 
a neutral platform for stakeholders to work together and co‐create solutions to 
emerging issues of significant importance.  
   
  The goal of the Government‐sponsored Future Centre is to find common 
ground through open discussions in a facilitated and supportive surrounding, so 
that the pre‐existing dichotomy mindset and adversary culture of opposing forces 
can  be  transformed  to  resolve  conflicts  of  interests.  To  help  reach  consensus, 
asymmetric expectation and access to information among stakeholders need to 
be  bridged.  This  will  lower the communication distortion.   A  more  neutral and 
non‐confrontational  environment  is  therefore  needed.  Stakeholders,  including 
activists  and  government  officials,  often  adjust  their  positions,  narrow  their 
difference  and  set  priority  on  action  items  over  more  factual  and  rational 
discussions.  Future  Centre  is  an  emerging  movement  which  has  been 
implemented in many world locations with success.ix
  
 
6 
 
  In Continental Europe,  Government‐sponsored  Future Centres  have  been 
delivering  results  through  an  alternative  form  of  participatory  democracy. 
Government‐sponsored Future Centres in the Netherland and Northern Europe 
have  resolved  enduring  problems  that  cannot  be  solved  with  the  same  old 
solutions. The same method can be used as an alternative to public consultation 
and conflict resolution tools to build better policy‐making capacity among public 
policy makers, the activists and the general public. Through a more neutral third 
party such as Future Centres, government units can proactively engage the public 
and  activities  in  complex  political,  economic  and  social  issue  discussions. 
Government‐sponsored Future Centres also can act as neutral platforms allowing 
public policy makers and local communities to interact, share ideas and discuss 
better policy making in an open and non‐pressurized manner. 
 
  Future Centre was first started in Sweden in the 1990s by Skandia, a private 
insurance company. They have since spread to many countries across the world 
particularly  in  Europe.  As  an  example,  there  are  five  government‐sponsored 
Future Centres for the Public Sector x
 in the Netherlands:  
o The Country House  ‐‐ a facility ‘for creative and innovative work in 
national  government’,  a  joint  venture  of  four  ministries:  Economic 
Affairs,  The  Interior,  Finance,  and  Housing,  Spatial  Planning  &  the 
Environment; 
o Mobilion ‐‐ a Future Center prototype at the Department of Public 
Works & Water Management; 
o Future Center ‘The Shipyard' ‐‐ at the Tax & Customs Administration; 
o Castle  Groeneveld  ‐‐  National  Center  for  Forests,  Nature  and 
Landscape, of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality; 
o Academy SZW  ‐‐ part of the Ministry of Social Affairs & Employment. 
 
  The  Dutch  Government‐sponsored  Future  Centres  are  good  examples 
where government departments serve as a convener or orchestrator that brings 
public  and  private  participants  together  to  solve  problems  and  pursue 
opportunities together.     
 
7 
 
Crowdsourcing for democracyxi
 
  The future centre movement in Finland took a slightly different turn. The 
initiative was sponsored by the Committee for the Future of the Parliament of 
Finland in 1993. In the same year, the Finnish Parliament started commissioning 
research on topics that are relevant or challenging to the future of Finland. The 
Committee gives systematic foresight to the government and parliament as well 
as to people in public administration. Finland has a system of several foresight 
units and processes. The Prime Minister's Office prepares a government foresight 
report  in  each  electorate  period.  This  government  foresight  report  is  then 
submitted to the Parliament. This facilitates the formulation of a national strategy 
on high‐interest topics that would guarantee the success of the nation. Previous 
topics  Finland  looked  into  includes:  sustainable  knowledge  society,  information 
society, smart city, clean technology, media and communications.xii
 
 
  People’s participation through crowdsourcing does not replace traditional 
democratic tools or experts, but complements and supports them. Participation 
can yield better decisions. A thousand pairs of eyes will spot potential problems 
easier and a thousand heads will come up with more new ideas than just a few. 
Instead of the highly confrontational public consultation process, crowdsourcing 
is  a  participatory  method  to  engage  citizens  in  political  processes.  Citizens  are 
invited  to  share  their  ideas,  perspectives  and  opinions  about  matters  that 
traditionally were beyond their access and influence. 
   
  Crowdsourcing  is  a  tool  to  gather  collective  intelligence.  It  help  steer 
thinking  away  from  the  "Not  Invented  Here"  syndrome.  The  tool  discovers 
knowledge, wisdom and insight from the "crowd".  Most of the services provided 
are on a voluntary basis. But some tasks, such as compiling reports and turning 
reports  into  useful  policy  inputs,  are  also  provided  as  paid  services.  In  some 
countries, crowdsourcing is used by international monitoring agencies as a tool to 
detect election fraud.  It also has product development and product innovation 
applications.  Large  pharmaceutical  companies  in  the  USA  often  ask  practicing 
doctors to suggest cancer drug cocktail solutions on cancer treatments. Proctor 
8 
 
and  Gamble  also  crowdsource  from  non‐experts  and  consumers  for  novelty 
solutions.  
 
  From  the  viewpoint  of  how  to  improve  governance  in  Hong  Kong, 
crowdsourcing in policy making is probably the most useful application. In Europe, 
it  is  often  used  in  listening  to  citizens’  opinions  and  gathering  information.  In 
2010,  crowdsourcing was  used  in  Iceland to facilitate the  constitutional  reform 
process.  The  process  brought  new  perspectives  and  implanted  knowledge  and 
information  to  the  "crowd"  in  an  unpressurized  environment.  It  also  raised 
awareness  amongst  citizens  in  the  democratic  and  policy‐making  process.    A 
similar method was also used in Chicago and in Calgary in the budget preparation 
process, in the "National Dialogue" initiated by President Obama of the United 
States,  in  Citizen  petition  sites  in  the  UK  and  in  Australia  and  in  the  "Open 
Ministry" in Finland.  
 
  Crowdsourcing  has  very  direct  impact  on  the  democratic  process  in 
democratic countries. It brings in a mixed bag of amateur and expert opinions. 
Information  and  expert  knowledge  also  flows  out  to  citizens  in  an  opened 
process. This process also allows citizens to have access in the policy‐formulation 
process  and  therefore  the  decision‐making  process.  At  the  same  time,  policy‐
makers  learn  citizens'  values, concerns  and  attitudes.   Opening up the  political 
process through crowdsourcing increases legitimacy in the political process.  
 
  However,  it  does  not  replace  the  normal  process  ‐‐  such  as  the  expert 
hearings  in  the  legislative  process  or  even  the  standard  advisory  committees 
practiced in Hong Kong. However, in the case of Hong Kong, it could be used as a 
more  effective  public  engagement,  policy‐making  and  even  conflict  resolution 
tool.         
   
Current public engagement capacity in Hong Kong
In 2011, Professor Joseph Chan Cho‐wai, Co‐Convenor (Research) of Path of 
Democracy was the founding director of the Centre for Civil Society and 
9 
 
Governance, HKU. He took on the task of spearheading a citizen engagement 
project titled: "From Consultation to Civic Engagement: The Road to Better Policy‐
making and Governance in Hong Kong".  
 
  The  Efficiency  Unit  (EU)  of  the  Chief  Secretary's  Office  of  HKSAR 
Government has been exploring the feasibility of a government‐sponsored Future 
Centre  since  2010.  The  EU  sees  Future  Centre  as  stimulations  to  cross‐
departmental  government  innovation  with  a  future  orientation.  The  Future 
Centre practice also integrates creative problem solving, organizational learning, 
knowledge creation, and organizational change and renewal by using the wisdom 
of crowds. The EU organized a "Future Centre in Public Service" workshop in April 
2011, and has also sent staff to attend Aalto Camp for Societal Innovation held at 
the Aalto University in Finland in August 2011. Mr. Kim Salkeld, current Head of 
The  Efficiency  Unit,  is  keen  to  implement  the  concept  but  he  also  said  he  is 
probably  the  only  one  who  is  talking  about  the  idea  within  the  HKSAR 
Government.  Learning  from  the  U.S.  and  other  countries'  experience,  OGCIO 
commented in Oct 2012 that open data could play a role in crowd sourcing ideas 
from the public to co‐create solutions to solve social problems.  
 
  Activities of the Future Centre would include community discussion, forums 
or other facilitated public engagement activities to gauge public views on specific 
legislation  and  on  government  projects.  Discussion  forums  are  facilitated  and 
moderated by skilled facilitators so that participants are encouraged to let go of 
assumptions and mistrust, not to accept easy answers and to maintain their drive 
to  co‐create  innovative  solutions  to  complex  social  and  economic  problems. 
Future Centres allow participants and facilitators to think out of the box and inject 
positive  energy  into  public  policy  making,  which  means  they  are  freed  from 
previous biases/prejudices and formalities.  Citizens can help to identify the 'blind 
spots'  or  'gaps'  which  have  been  overlooked  by  the  government  in  policy 
formulation. 
 
10 
 
Government-sponsored Future Centre as a conflict resolution toolxiii
 
  The way we describe our history is of key importance in determining what 
future possibilities are open to us.  A generation or two ago, Hong Kong would 
readily accept decisions made hierarchically as good decision. Leadership in Hong 
Kong was one‐sided ‐‐ those in positions of power know what is best for Hong 
Kong. These "old" leaders acted unilaterally and pushed through solutions which 
they truly believed were in the best interest of Hong Kong as a whole and often 
created strong conflict with the community in the process ‐‐ one‐sided, top‐down 
"managerial" decisions are rarely effective nowadays.  
 
  In  a  place  as  complex  as  Post‐1997  Hong  Kong,  a  new  leadership  style 
where  political  and  community  leaders  knows  how  to  mediate  and  to  lead 
through situations of conflict is needed. Practicing such a leadership style does 
not  mean  abandoning  his  or  her  conviction,  but  it  does  mean  having  a  broad 
shoulder  to  reach  out  and  to  accommodate  the  interests  of  others  and  the 
interests of the society as a whole.  As difficult and as challenging as it sounds, 
this "Third‐way" leadership style mediates differences and has potential to turn 
conflicts into opportunities. It is not enough to have the capacity to stand up for 
one's  own  interests,  but  it  is  also  important  for  Hong  Kong  to  develop  the 
capacities and the platforms to reach across different interest group and to listen 
to others.  
 
  In Post‐1997 Hong Kong ‐‐ particularly in the light of the latest 28 February 
2016 New Territory East by‐election results, the potential for destructive conflict 
is  real.    How  the  HKSAR  Government,  the  politicians  and  community  leaders 
choose  to  resolve  conflicts  is  an  act  of  leadership.  Introduction  of  the 
Government‐sponsored Future Centre concept into Hong Kong has potential to 
turn  conflicts  into  a  driving  force  to  reform  Hong  Kong's  future  rather  than  a 
liability and destructive force. Mark Gerzon, author of "Leading through Conflict" 
said:  "…  if  a  handyman  came  to  your  house  to  do  home  repair  with  a  toolbox 
containing nothing but hammers …  (your house) would be in a wreck!"  Someone 
11 
 
need enough conviction to believe in "cross boundaries" to fix things, otherwise 
Hong Kong could also be in a wreck! 
Future Centre as an alternative form of democracy to improve governance
 
  Against a complex political background and the eventual transition toward 
Universal Suffrage of the Chief Executive and Legislative Council, Hong Kong will 
eventually  have  to  come  to  an  agreement  on  a  policy  development  and 
constitutional  framework  that  connects  the  society  to  government.  Whether 
Hong Kong will be successful in its constitutional reform effort is still unclear and 
it  is  still  uncertain  whether  Hong  Kong  will  be  able  to  move  forward  on  the 
political development front. There is a glimpse of hope that might work in Hong 
Kong's favour ‐‐ since China is also going through rapid changes, it will have no 
choice but to look into a more representative form of government to solve many 
social  conflicts  and  governance  problem  in  its  economic  development.  Perhaps 
the Mainland is willing to borrow successful ideas ‐‐ such as from Hong Kong's 
experiment in practicing the Government‐sponsor Future Centre. Both Hong Kong 
and Mainland China will have much to gain if Hong Kong could position itself as a 
liberal and more advanced territory in China that is more ready than the Mainland 
to resolve differences in an open and democratic manner ‐‐ not a place that could 
subvert China.  
 
  This paper proposes that people of Hong Kong need to understand their 
past in order to find a pathway for the future. The first Government‐sponsored 
Future Centre could be set up in a historical building ‐‐ a setting that connects 
participants of the Government‐sponsored Future Centre to the collective social 
memory of Hong Kong's different communities across time. The old setting of a 
historical  building  would  naturally  lead  participants  to  imagine  what  had 
happened  in  the  past  and  thus  create new  meaning  from  past  history  through 
rational and innovative discussions.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
12 
 
                                                            
References: 
 
i
 From Functional Constituencies to Party Dictatorship, From a British Political Idea to British Political Practice, 
HKDF speaker luncheon by Professor Tony Carty, 21 December 2009  
(http://www.hkdf.org/newsarticles.asp?show=newsarticles&newsarticle=255) 
 
ii
  http://www.scmp.com/business/economy/article/1425676/public‐trust‐government‐andbusiness‐falling‐says‐
survey 
 
iii
  Speech by Mr. Lam Woon‐kwong, "Towards better policy‐making in Hong Kong" at speaker luncheon organized 
by the Hong Kong Democratic Foundation on 7 January 2011: 
(http://www.hkdf.org/newsarticles.asp?show=newsarticles&newsarticle=291) 
 
iv
  Lung, Alan Ka‐lun(2003). Review of the Role and Functions of Public Sector Advisory and Statutory Bodies (29 
May 2003, www.hkdf.org)  
 
v
  Chan, J. (2007). From Consultation to Civic Engagement: The Road to Better Policy‐making and Governance in 
Hong Kong. Prepared by Centre for Civil Society and Governance, the University of Hong Kong and commissioned 
by Bauhinia Foundation Research Centre. 
 
vi
Governing Hong Kong: Insights from the British Declassified Files, Oxford University Press, 2012; 李彭廣,
香港的管治團隊: 英治時期的運作與回歸後的更新,  
vii
  2016 Policy Address of the HKSAR Government.  
 
viii
  Lam Woon‐kwong's speech at the Hong Kong Democratic Foundation, 7 January 2011. 
 
ix
  The Future Centre Alliance (http://summit.futurecentres.com/history/) acts as a focus for future centres from 
around the world. 
 
x
  Kune, H. (2004).  Five Dutch Future Centers for the Public Sector. 
 
xi
 Crowdsourcing for Demcracy: A New Era in Policy‐making, published by the Committee for th Future of the 
Parliament of Finland.  
 
xii
  Ulla Rosenström and Nicolas Balcom Raleigh. (2015). Inclusive Foresight for Finland. 
 
xiii
 Mark Gerzon, Leading through Conflict ‐‐ How Successful Leaders Tranform Diffenceces into Opportunities, 
Harvard Business School Press (2006)  

More Related Content

What's hot

Selling Millenials on Political Participation
Selling Millenials on Political ParticipationSelling Millenials on Political Participation
Selling Millenials on Political Participation
Nadine Janzen
 
Religion, Politics, and Development Essays in Development Economics and Polit...
Religion, Politics, and Development Essays in Development Economics and Polit...Religion, Politics, and Development Essays in Development Economics and Polit...
Religion, Politics, and Development Essays in Development Economics and Polit...
Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics
 
Social_TheoryApplication_HongKong
Social_TheoryApplication_HongKongSocial_TheoryApplication_HongKong
Social_TheoryApplication_HongKong
Kurt Callaway
 
Governance and the economy in Asia and the United States institutions instrum...
Governance and the economy in Asia and the United States institutions instrum...Governance and the economy in Asia and the United States institutions instrum...
Governance and the economy in Asia and the United States institutions instrum...
Caroline Servat
 

What's hot (18)

Selling Millenials on Political Participation
Selling Millenials on Political ParticipationSelling Millenials on Political Participation
Selling Millenials on Political Participation
 
En egipto eng Relation Sandro Suzart SUZART GOOGLE INC United States o...
En egipto eng Relation Sandro Suzart  SUZART    GOOGLE INC    United States o...En egipto eng Relation Sandro Suzart  SUZART    GOOGLE INC    United States o...
En egipto eng Relation Sandro Suzart SUZART GOOGLE INC United States o...
 
New public management
New public managementNew public management
New public management
 
Religion, Politics, and Development Essays in Development Economics and Polit...
Religion, Politics, and Development Essays in Development Economics and Polit...Religion, Politics, and Development Essays in Development Economics and Polit...
Religion, Politics, and Development Essays in Development Economics and Polit...
 
Effects of globalization on public administration
Effects of globalization on public administrationEffects of globalization on public administration
Effects of globalization on public administration
 
Fight against corruption
Fight against corruptionFight against corruption
Fight against corruption
 
Final blue-print-365-policy-report
Final blue-print-365-policy-reportFinal blue-print-365-policy-report
Final blue-print-365-policy-report
 
Corruption in China
Corruption in ChinaCorruption in China
Corruption in China
 
Globalization, Organization, and Public Administration
Globalization, Organization, and Public AdministrationGlobalization, Organization, and Public Administration
Globalization, Organization, and Public Administration
 
Social Security as a Factor Contributing to the Evolution of the Political Sy...
Social Security as a Factor Contributing to the Evolution of the Political Sy...Social Security as a Factor Contributing to the Evolution of the Political Sy...
Social Security as a Factor Contributing to the Evolution of the Political Sy...
 
Globalization, Nationalism and Public Administration
Globalization, Nationalism and Public AdministrationGlobalization, Nationalism and Public Administration
Globalization, Nationalism and Public Administration
 
New Approaches in Public Service Delivery
New Approaches in Public Service DeliveryNew Approaches in Public Service Delivery
New Approaches in Public Service Delivery
 
Social_TheoryApplication_HongKong
Social_TheoryApplication_HongKongSocial_TheoryApplication_HongKong
Social_TheoryApplication_HongKong
 
Fight against corruption souvik bhaumik
Fight against corruption souvik bhaumikFight against corruption souvik bhaumik
Fight against corruption souvik bhaumik
 
New public management (npm) and public sector administration in nigeria
New public management (npm) and public sector administration in nigeriaNew public management (npm) and public sector administration in nigeria
New public management (npm) and public sector administration in nigeria
 
Blessing corruption: institutional reforms
Blessing corruption: institutional reformsBlessing corruption: institutional reforms
Blessing corruption: institutional reforms
 
Dr. omer farooq zain 6
Dr. omer farooq zain 6Dr. omer farooq zain 6
Dr. omer farooq zain 6
 
Governance and the economy in Asia and the United States institutions instrum...
Governance and the economy in Asia and the United States institutions instrum...Governance and the economy in Asia and the United States institutions instrum...
Governance and the economy in Asia and the United States institutions instrum...
 

Viewers also liked

Solomon Food and Beverage
Solomon Food and BeverageSolomon Food and Beverage
Solomon Food and Beverage
seoulfood
 

Viewers also liked (11)

CITIE Report 2015
CITIE Report 2015CITIE Report 2015
CITIE Report 2015
 
Pages from gii 2016 -- the age of innovation diplomacy
Pages from gii 2016 -- the age of innovation diplomacyPages from gii 2016 -- the age of innovation diplomacy
Pages from gii 2016 -- the age of innovation diplomacy
 
Human Freedom Index - 2015 by Cato Institute
Human Freedom Index - 2015 by Cato InstituteHuman Freedom Index - 2015 by Cato Institute
Human Freedom Index - 2015 by Cato Institute
 
Hk rating - The Most Innovation Cities in Asia Pacific
Hk rating  - The Most Innovation Cities in Asia PacificHk rating  - The Most Innovation Cities in Asia Pacific
Hk rating - The Most Innovation Cities in Asia Pacific
 
Our HK Foundation -- The Ecosystem of Innovation and Technology in HK (Dec 20...
Our HK Foundation -- The Ecosystem of Innovation and Technology in HK (Dec 20...Our HK Foundation -- The Ecosystem of Innovation and Technology in HK (Dec 20...
Our HK Foundation -- The Ecosystem of Innovation and Technology in HK (Dec 20...
 
HK Ranking - Global Innovation Index 2016 (full-report- 2016-v1)
HK Ranking  - Global Innovation Index 2016 (full-report- 2016-v1)HK Ranking  - Global Innovation Index 2016 (full-report- 2016-v1)
HK Ranking - Global Innovation Index 2016 (full-report- 2016-v1)
 
Healthcare Costing and Cost Management (CIMA Sept 2004)
Healthcare Costing and Cost Management (CIMA Sept 2004)Healthcare Costing and Cost Management (CIMA Sept 2004)
Healthcare Costing and Cost Management (CIMA Sept 2004)
 
From input accounting to output outcome management at OFTA (CIMA Mar 2004)
From input accounting to output outcome management at OFTA (CIMA Mar 2004)From input accounting to output outcome management at OFTA (CIMA Mar 2004)
From input accounting to output outcome management at OFTA (CIMA Mar 2004)
 
IP & Technology Transfer (7 Dec 2011)
IP & Technology Transfer (7 Dec 2011)IP & Technology Transfer (7 Dec 2011)
IP & Technology Transfer (7 Dec 2011)
 
政府參與的 未來中心
政府參與的 未來中心政府參與的 未來中心
政府參與的 未來中心
 
Solomon Food and Beverage
Solomon Food and BeverageSolomon Food and Beverage
Solomon Food and Beverage
 

Similar to Government-sponsor Future Centres (3 March 2016)

GROUP-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
GROUP-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...GROUP-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
GROUP-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
MarivicPenarubia1
 
Group-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
Group-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...Group-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
Group-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
MarivicPenarubia1
 
20910329 public opinion and the media in singapore
20910329   public opinion and the media in singapore20910329   public opinion and the media in singapore
20910329 public opinion and the media in singapore
Aisyah Bagarib
 
20910329 public opinion and the media in singapore
20910329   public opinion and the media in singapore20910329   public opinion and the media in singapore
20910329 public opinion and the media in singapore
Aisyah Bagarib
 
Public administration
Public administrationPublic administration
Public administration
Enes Bolfidan
 
Political Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1993 .docx
Political Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1993        .docxPolitical Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1993        .docx
Political Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1993 .docx
LacieKlineeb
 

Similar to Government-sponsor Future Centres (3 March 2016) (20)

GROUP-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
GROUP-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...GROUP-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
GROUP-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
 
Group-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
Group-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...Group-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
Group-2-EVOLUTION-OF-PUBLIC-ADMINISTRATION-THEORIES-AND-PRACTICES-TABLADELLO-...
 
The Role of Public Policy Research Institutions in Policymaking in Tunisia
The Role of Public Policy Research Institutions in Policymaking in TunisiaThe Role of Public Policy Research Institutions in Policymaking in Tunisia
The Role of Public Policy Research Institutions in Policymaking in Tunisia
 
Civic Engage in the policy process in Hong Kong
Civic Engage in the policy process in Hong KongCivic Engage in the policy process in Hong Kong
Civic Engage in the policy process in Hong Kong
 
NEW PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIOIN.pptx
NEW PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIOIN.pptxNEW PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIOIN.pptx
NEW PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIOIN.pptx
 
En egipto eng Relation between Sandro Suzart, SUZART, GOOGLE INC, Unite...
En egipto eng Relation between Sandro Suzart,  SUZART,    GOOGLE INC,   Unite...En egipto eng Relation between Sandro Suzart,  SUZART,    GOOGLE INC,   Unite...
En egipto eng Relation between Sandro Suzart, SUZART, GOOGLE INC, Unite...
 
H gov pmac 27.1
H gov pmac 27.1H gov pmac 27.1
H gov pmac 27.1
 
Introduction to Public Administration
Introduction to Public AdministrationIntroduction to Public Administration
Introduction to Public Administration
 
Theories and Practice of Public Admibistration
Theories and Practice of Public AdmibistrationTheories and Practice of Public Admibistration
Theories and Practice of Public Admibistration
 
20910329 public opinion and the media in singapore
20910329   public opinion and the media in singapore20910329   public opinion and the media in singapore
20910329 public opinion and the media in singapore
 
20910329 public opinion and the media in singapore
20910329   public opinion and the media in singapore20910329   public opinion and the media in singapore
20910329 public opinion and the media in singapore
 
Community planning 2010
Community planning 2010Community planning 2010
Community planning 2010
 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATIONPUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
 
Public administration
Public administrationPublic administration
Public administration
 
HKDF CE Election Proposal -- 16 april 2014 HKU CCPL (eng-final)
HKDF CE Election Proposal -- 16 april 2014 HKU CCPL (eng-final)HKDF CE Election Proposal -- 16 april 2014 HKU CCPL (eng-final)
HKDF CE Election Proposal -- 16 april 2014 HKU CCPL (eng-final)
 
The 2012 Chinese leadership change
The 2012 Chinese leadership changeThe 2012 Chinese leadership change
The 2012 Chinese leadership change
 
Political participation in Hong Kong / Politische Partizipation in Hongkong
Political participation in Hong Kong / Politische Partizipation in HongkongPolitical participation in Hong Kong / Politische Partizipation in Hongkong
Political participation in Hong Kong / Politische Partizipation in Hongkong
 
Political Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1993 .docx
Political Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1993        .docxPolitical Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1993        .docx
Political Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1993 .docx
 
The Evolution and Practices of Public Administration
The Evolution and Practices of Public  AdministrationThe Evolution and Practices of Public  Administration
The Evolution and Practices of Public Administration
 
Theories of bureaucratic politics ppt
Theories of bureaucratic politics pptTheories of bureaucratic politics ppt
Theories of bureaucratic politics ppt
 

More from Asia Pacific Intellectual Capital Centre Ltd

More from Asia Pacific Intellectual Capital Centre Ltd (20)

Does Hong Kong have an informal diplomatic role for China on the New Silk Roa...
Does Hong Kong have an informal diplomatic role for China on the New Silk Roa...Does Hong Kong have an informal diplomatic role for China on the New Silk Roa...
Does Hong Kong have an informal diplomatic role for China on the New Silk Roa...
 
HK Innovation and Technology Policy presentation by Nick Yang at HKGCC Member...
HK Innovation and Technology Policy presentation by Nick Yang at HKGCC Member...HK Innovation and Technology Policy presentation by Nick Yang at HKGCC Member...
HK Innovation and Technology Policy presentation by Nick Yang at HKGCC Member...
 
Crowdsourcing for democracy_f_www-libre
Crowdsourcing for democracy_f_www-libreCrowdsourcing for democracy_f_www-libre
Crowdsourcing for democracy_f_www-libre
 
ITB Connectivity
ITB ConnectivityITB Connectivity
ITB Connectivity
 
Future of manufacturing_driving_capabilities
Future of manufacturing_driving_capabilitiesFuture of manufacturing_driving_capabilities
Future of manufacturing_driving_capabilities
 
Wef gac ageing_white_paper
Wef gac ageing_white_paperWef gac ageing_white_paper
Wef gac ageing_white_paper
 
Top 10 emerging_urban_innovations_report_2010_20.10
Top 10 emerging_urban_innovations_report_2010_20.10Top 10 emerging_urban_innovations_report_2010_20.10
Top 10 emerging_urban_innovations_report_2010_20.10
 
Managing complex change
Managing complex changeManaging complex change
Managing complex change
 
Kicking Away the Ladder -- the “Real” History of Free Trade
Kicking Away the Ladder -- the  “Real” History of Free TradeKicking Away the Ladder -- the  “Real” History of Free Trade
Kicking Away the Ladder -- the “Real” History of Free Trade
 
Dutch Future Centres for Public Sector
Dutch Future Centres for Public SectorDutch Future Centres for Public Sector
Dutch Future Centres for Public Sector
 
IP Trading Final Report
IP Trading Final ReportIP Trading Final Report
IP Trading Final Report
 
Industry 4.0 -- Roland berger t2014-04-03
Industry 4.0 -- Roland berger t2014-04-03Industry 4.0 -- Roland berger t2014-04-03
Industry 4.0 -- Roland berger t2014-04-03
 
Industry 4.0 Final Report, National Academy of Science and Engineering of Ger...
Industry 4.0 Final Report, National Academy of Science and Engineering of Ger...Industry 4.0 Final Report, National Academy of Science and Engineering of Ger...
Industry 4.0 Final Report, National Academy of Science and Engineering of Ger...
 
"One Belt, One Road"
"One Belt, One Road""One Belt, One Road"
"One Belt, One Road"
 
2010 New York Academy of Science -- Russian Innovation Policy
2010 New York Academy of Science -- Russian Innovation Policy2010 New York Academy of Science -- Russian Innovation Policy
2010 New York Academy of Science -- Russian Innovation Policy
 
Digital Planet: Readying for the Rise of the e-Consumer
Digital Planet: Readying for the Rise of the e-ConsumerDigital Planet: Readying for the Rise of the e-Consumer
Digital Planet: Readying for the Rise of the e-Consumer
 
The Russian Federation's International Science and Technology Cooperation
The Russian Federation's International Science and Technology CooperationThe Russian Federation's International Science and Technology Cooperation
The Russian Federation's International Science and Technology Cooperation
 
Russia: Focus on Innovation
Russia: Focus on Innovation Russia: Focus on Innovation
Russia: Focus on Innovation
 
Russia's 2020 Strategic Economic Goals and the Roe of International Integration
Russia's 2020 Strategic Economic Goals and the Roe of International IntegrationRussia's 2020 Strategic Economic Goals and the Roe of International Integration
Russia's 2020 Strategic Economic Goals and the Roe of International Integration
 
High-tech Strategy 2020 for Germany
High-tech Strategy 2020 for GermanyHigh-tech Strategy 2020 for Germany
High-tech Strategy 2020 for Germany
 

Recently uploaded

Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Cabang Ilmu (2024) - Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Caba...
Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Cabang Ilmu (2024) - Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Caba...Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Cabang Ilmu (2024) - Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Caba...
Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Cabang Ilmu (2024) - Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Caba...
suryaaamsyah
 
一比一原版(Adelaide毕业证)阿德莱德大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(Adelaide毕业证)阿德莱德大学毕业证成绩单一比一原版(Adelaide毕业证)阿德莱德大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(Adelaide毕业证)阿德莱德大学毕业证成绩单
enbam
 
一比一原版(UWA毕业证)西澳大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(UWA毕业证)西澳大学毕业证成绩单一比一原版(UWA毕业证)西澳大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(UWA毕业证)西澳大学毕业证成绩单
enbam
 
一比一原版(MQU毕业证)麦考瑞大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(MQU毕业证)麦考瑞大学毕业证成绩单一比一原版(MQU毕业证)麦考瑞大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(MQU毕业证)麦考瑞大学毕业证成绩单
enbam
 
Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning is not a humane alternative to Carbon Dioxi...
Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning is not a humane alternative to Carbon Dioxi...Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning is not a humane alternative to Carbon Dioxi...
Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning is not a humane alternative to Carbon Dioxi...
Harm Kiezebrink
 
SK 10% nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
SK 10% nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnSK 10% nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
SK 10% nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
RyanAlejandro5
 

Recently uploaded (20)

EDI Executive Education Master Class- 15thMay 2024 (updated) (2)
EDI Executive Education Master Class- 15thMay 2024 (updated) (2)EDI Executive Education Master Class- 15thMay 2024 (updated) (2)
EDI Executive Education Master Class- 15thMay 2024 (updated) (2)
 
bee engaged with youth - World Bee Day 2024
bee engaged with youth - World Bee Day 2024bee engaged with youth - World Bee Day 2024
bee engaged with youth - World Bee Day 2024
 
How to Save a Place: How to Fund Your Preservation Project
How to Save a Place: How to Fund Your Preservation ProjectHow to Save a Place: How to Fund Your Preservation Project
How to Save a Place: How to Fund Your Preservation Project
 
Medieval Iraq Demographic Factors Yale Historical Review
Medieval Iraq Demographic Factors Yale Historical ReviewMedieval Iraq Demographic Factors Yale Historical Review
Medieval Iraq Demographic Factors Yale Historical Review
 
Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Cabang Ilmu (2024) - Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Caba...
Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Cabang Ilmu (2024) - Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Caba...Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Cabang Ilmu (2024) - Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Caba...
Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Cabang Ilmu (2024) - Daftar Rumpun, Pohon, dan Caba...
 
2024: The FAR - Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 35
2024: The FAR - Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 352024: The FAR - Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 35
2024: The FAR - Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 35
 
#Bepartoftheplan on International Day For Biological Diversity 2024
#Bepartoftheplan on International Day For Biological Diversity 2024#Bepartoftheplan on International Day For Biological Diversity 2024
#Bepartoftheplan on International Day For Biological Diversity 2024
 
一比一原版(Adelaide毕业证)阿德莱德大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(Adelaide毕业证)阿德莱德大学毕业证成绩单一比一原版(Adelaide毕业证)阿德莱德大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(Adelaide毕业证)阿德莱德大学毕业证成绩单
 
Building a better Britain: How cities like Bradford can help to end economic ...
Building a better Britain: How cities like Bradford can help to end economic ...Building a better Britain: How cities like Bradford can help to end economic ...
Building a better Britain: How cities like Bradford can help to end economic ...
 
一比一原版(UWA毕业证)西澳大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(UWA毕业证)西澳大学毕业证成绩单一比一原版(UWA毕业证)西澳大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(UWA毕业证)西澳大学毕业证成绩单
 
International Day of Families - 15 May 2024 - UNDESA.
International Day of Families - 15 May 2024 - UNDESA.International Day of Families - 15 May 2024 - UNDESA.
International Day of Families - 15 May 2024 - UNDESA.
 
07/03/2024 Publiekdomeindag - voormiddag
07/03/2024 Publiekdomeindag - voormiddag07/03/2024 Publiekdomeindag - voormiddag
07/03/2024 Publiekdomeindag - voormiddag
 
一比一原版(MQU毕业证)麦考瑞大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(MQU毕业证)麦考瑞大学毕业证成绩单一比一原版(MQU毕业证)麦考瑞大学毕业证成绩单
一比一原版(MQU毕业证)麦考瑞大学毕业证成绩单
 
Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning is not a humane alternative to Carbon Dioxi...
Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning is not a humane alternative to Carbon Dioxi...Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning is not a humane alternative to Carbon Dioxi...
Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning is not a humane alternative to Carbon Dioxi...
 
SK 10% nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
SK 10% nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnSK 10% nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
SK 10% nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
 
Lahore Resolution of 1940, Emergence of Bangladesh.pptx
Lahore Resolution of 1940, Emergence of Bangladesh.pptxLahore Resolution of 1940, Emergence of Bangladesh.pptx
Lahore Resolution of 1940, Emergence of Bangladesh.pptx
 
2024: The FAR - Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 34
2024: The FAR - Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 342024: The FAR - Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 34
2024: The FAR - Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 34
 
Sponsoring a Girl Child's Education in kurnool
Sponsoring a Girl Child's Education in kurnoolSponsoring a Girl Child's Education in kurnool
Sponsoring a Girl Child's Education in kurnool
 
Who are the Sherden Yale Historical Review
Who are the Sherden Yale Historical ReviewWho are the Sherden Yale Historical Review
Who are the Sherden Yale Historical Review
 
Mothers Without Children Yale Historical Review
Mothers Without Children Yale Historical ReviewMothers Without Children Yale Historical Review
Mothers Without Children Yale Historical Review
 

Government-sponsor Future Centres (3 March 2016)

  • 1. 1    Government-sponsored Future Centres as an alternative form of democracy for good governance Alan LUNG Ka‐lun, Path of Democracy    Background and Introduction Professor Tony Carty of the University of Hong  Kong pointed out at a speaker  luncheon on 21 December 2009i  that equal and universal suffrage on its own is an  insufficient guarantee of true democracy. In the case of the UK and many other  jurisdictions, low elector turnout often means that governments could be elected  by as little as 25% of the registered voters. These governments do not have strong  mandates. In the UK particularly, the commercial elite can succeed in subverting  the main political parties (Labour and Conservatives) so that their agendas take  precedence  over  that  of  the  people  in  general  and  "Functional  Constituencies"  (FCs) are at work without formally enshrining FCs in UK's political systems.       Professor  Eliza  Lee  Wing‐yee  of  the  University  of  Hong  Kong  quoted  a  survey  prepared  by  public  relations  agency  Edelman  in  February  2014:  "…  Hongkonger's  trust  in  government  fell  18  points  to  45  per  cent  due  to  policy  failure, legitimacy problems and scandal".ii   In the case of Hong Kong, the "market  imbalance" brought by the FCs in Hong Kong must be redressed, preferably by  restoring  the  institutional  protections  against  malign  actions  enjoyed  by  representative democracies: a free press, an autonomous civil service, powerful  judiciaries and an alternative mechanism to link stakeholders in the community to  the Government policy formulation process.       On 7 January 2011, Mr. Lam Woon‐kwong, current Convener of the Non‐ executive  Members  of  the  Executive  Council,  shared  his  experience  on  civic  engagement at a Hong Kong Democratic Foundation speaker luncheon where Mr.  C.Y. Leung was present. As the speaker of the event, Mr. Lam shared a case study 
  • 2. 2    where  he  commissioned  a  research  project  headed  by  Professor  Joseph  Chan  Cho‐wai  of  the  University  of  Hong  Kong  on  prototyping  a  new  model  of  Civic  Engagement  on  the  Kai  Tak  Planning  Study.iii    All  the  requirements  of  the  stakeholders  were  met  in  this  complex  and  difficult  urban  planning  exercise.  However, the process had taken two and a half years to come up with the final  "2006 Outline Zoning Plan for Kai Tak".       A  more  flexible  and  effective  method  is  needed  to  engage  the  general  public in solving urgent and contentious social, economic and political issues such  as: Copy Right Amendment, the Third Runway, Border Control of the Express Rail  Link to Mainland China, and Land and Housing Development Policies. Other long‐ term but no less controversial issues include: Economic Development, Population  Policy, Income Inequality and Retirement Protection. Of all the issues, the most  difficult ones are taken up by Path of Democracy and the publisher of this book.  These include: Mainland‐Hong Kong Relations under the Basic Law, One‐Country‐ Two‐Systems,  Preserving  Hong  Kong's  Rule  of  Law  and  How  to  Build  Political  Consensus on Hong Kong's forthcoming Constitutional Reform.       Some causes of policy failures in Hong Kong   In 2003, research conducted by Prof.  Fernando Cheung Chiu‐hung of the  Poly  University  of  Hong  Kong  iv   found  that  the  mechanism  needed  to  forge  consensus  and unity  amongst the  different sectors of the community is  largely  missing. Hong Kong's "Advisory Committee System" which Hong Kong relies on is  no  longer  performing  the  function  of  giving  useful  advice  to  the  HKSAR  Government.  The  advisory  committees  are  often  captured  by  yes‐men  and  inactive members who accept the Administration's view without questions. Many  advisory committees, particularly the lower‐level ones, are unnecessary. There is  a  widespread  culture  of  encouraging  members  to  agree  with  the  views  of  administration.  Dissenting  opinions  and  difficult  questions  are  discouraged.  Members  of  the  business  community  are  often  given  preference  in  the  appointment  process.  Others,  particularly  the  activists  who  have  democratic  affiliations, are excluded from the selection process.        In 2007, Professor Joseph Chan Cho‐wai of  The University of Hong Kong  said  in  a  report  of  a  research  project  sponsored  by  the  Bauhinia  Foundation  Research  Centre ‐‐ From Consultation to Civic Engagement: The Road to  Better  Policy‐making and Governance in Hong Kong: “… the traditional mode of public 
  • 3. 3    consultation has failed, but a new mode has yet to be established. The political  and  social  ecology  of  Hong  Kong  has  changed  so  drastically  since  1997  that  governing  through  an  advisory  system  and  conventional  public  consultation  no  longer satisfies public expectations"v .       In  2014,  Professor  Li  Pang‐kwong  commented  in  his  book  ‐‐  Governing  Hong Kong: Insights from the British Declassified Files, "… Policy‐making in Hong  Kong before 1997 was monopolized by ‘Home’ (U.K.) civil servants posted in Hong  Kong. Local Chinese Administrative Officers were hired to execute policies, but not  to formulate them. After the withdrawal of British rule after the handover, Hong  Kong's entire governance system has failed to effectively adjust. This is why the  HKSAR Government does not know how to make policies after 1997.” vi         One may agree or disagree with Professor Li's observation, but it appears  that Hong Kong has abandoned the Pre‐1997 practice of recruiting the more vocal  activists into the political process to make them see the Government's viewpoint  and, at the same time, make best use of their knowledge  and wisdom to  help  solve difficult problems faced by the Government. Politics in Post‐1997 Hong Kong  has certainly become complex and confrontational. Filibuster has been deployed  more  and  more  often  in  the  Legislative  Council  to  delay  the  passage  of  some  "undesired" legislation and budget approval. There is so far no perfect solution to  end a destructive mood in politics, but irrational discussion can only be alleviated  if governance and public trust in the HKSAR Government can be re‐established.    The capacity to solve complex problems is missing   Many deep rooted conflicts and problems in Hong Kong are waiting to be  solved. Top of the list on the current HKSAR Government agenda are: exorbitant  property prices,vii  economic development, income inequality, poverty alleviation  and how to care for an aging population. Such problems are universal and are not  unique  to  Hong  Kong.  However,  the  capacity  to  solve  the  complex  problems  facing Hong Kong seems to be missing.         Mr.  Lam  Woon‐kwong,  an  experienced  government  administrator  and  Convener  of  the  Non‐official  Members  of  the  Executive  Council  of  the  HKSAR  Government acknowledged that better policy making is demanded universally. He 
  • 4. 4    also acknowledged that it is very difficult.viii   In his view, most governments are  conservative or they're at least staffed by conservative people ‐‐ the civil servants.  The  result  is  that  this  breeds  a  "risk  averse"  culture,  particularly  when  civil  servants are deeply involved in the policy formulation, decision making and the  political  process.  According  to  Mr.  Lam,  while  civil  servants  often  position  themselves as "politically neutral" and defender of public interests, all ideas from  "outsiders" are unwelcomed intrusions which must be representative of special  interest  groups  and  are  usually  resisted.  Mr.  Lam  went  on  to  explain  that  the  typical way to handle policy making is to form a committee.       This  is  the  usual  risk‐averse  way  the  HKSAR  Government  uses  to  handle  complex problem. Typically, decisions are based on the views of a very small circle  that  may  not  have  reflected  their  opinions  in  the  advisory  committees.  These  "Preconceived Answers" and final solutions implemented are often hidden in the  small paragraphs of "Consultation Papers".      "Another problem with the civil service is that talents are almost entirely  inbred:  the  "revolving  door"  being  very  difficult  to  implement.  With  a  fast‐ changing world, the Hong Kong civil service lacks specialist expertise, and even if  some  officers  may  be  trained  to  handle  specialist  policy  areas,  they  lack  the  capacity to handle the complex policy‐making process. So we end up lagging quite  significantly  behind  in  areas  such  as  Information,  Innovation,  Technology  and  Creative Industries," said Mr. Lam.  Soon after 1997, the permanent civil servants  were  topped  with  a  layer  of  political  appointees.  Under  pressure,  the  HKSAR  Government has no time for research and analysis. Policy makers often jump to  ad hoc conclusions for "band‐aid" cure or short‐term solutions. It is easy for the  media or the general public to point fingers at the Chief Executive and the Bureau  Chiefs. The Asian Financial Crisis and uncooperative Legislative Council are often  blamed.  Sadly,  the  truth  is  closer  to  the  fact  that  after  the  British  Hong  Kong  Administration  left,  Hong  Kong  as  a  community  does  not  really  know  enough  about policy making and the "Craft of Government" needed to run a "city" that  has  the  GDP  of  a  medium  size  country  in  Europe.  The  experience,  the  subject 
  • 5. 5    knowledge and the political acumen needed to lead the Hong Kong community  forward seem to be sorely missing.         Government-sponsored Future Centres in Europe      In a place as sophisticated, developed and liberal minded as Hong Kong, the  Government must have the mediation skills and participate in the process to help  opposing camps see the common goal. The Government must acquire the skills  needed to lead the community to agree on a common set of objectives. Mr. Lam  Woon  Kwong  pointed  out  that  "…  the  best  way  forward  is  to  leave  the  engagement  process  open  and  empower  the  stakeholders  to  make  their  own  rules  to  resolve  their  differences  through  organized  interaction,  guided  and  arbitrated  hopefully  by  a  positive  and  trusted  player  at  the  helm".  But  if  the  lesson has already been learned and the precedent for success is recorded, how  did we end up in our present impasse? The problem is again complex but it boils  down to the common syndrome: lack of genuine desire to be open, lack of will to  engage the opposition and be seriously inclusive, lack of honesty to admit failures,  and in the end lack of sincere commitment from the top.      Government‐sponsored  Future  Centre  is  a  proven  solution  in  many  European  countries  to  gauge  public  views  and  develop  capacities  for  resolving  complex issues in turbulent times. They facilitate better governance by providing  a neutral platform for stakeholders to work together and co‐create solutions to  emerging issues of significant importance.         The goal of the Government‐sponsored Future Centre is to find common  ground through open discussions in a facilitated and supportive surrounding, so  that the pre‐existing dichotomy mindset and adversary culture of opposing forces  can  be  transformed  to  resolve  conflicts  of  interests.  To  help  reach  consensus,  asymmetric expectation and access to information among stakeholders need to  be  bridged.  This  will  lower the communication distortion.   A  more  neutral and  non‐confrontational  environment  is  therefore  needed.  Stakeholders,  including  activists  and  government  officials,  often  adjust  their  positions,  narrow  their  difference  and  set  priority  on  action  items  over  more  factual  and  rational  discussions.  Future  Centre  is  an  emerging  movement  which  has  been  implemented in many world locations with success.ix     
  • 6. 6      In Continental Europe,  Government‐sponsored  Future Centres  have  been  delivering  results  through  an  alternative  form  of  participatory  democracy.  Government‐sponsored Future Centres in the Netherland and Northern Europe  have  resolved  enduring  problems  that  cannot  be  solved  with  the  same  old  solutions. The same method can be used as an alternative to public consultation  and conflict resolution tools to build better policy‐making capacity among public  policy makers, the activists and the general public. Through a more neutral third  party such as Future Centres, government units can proactively engage the public  and  activities  in  complex  political,  economic  and  social  issue  discussions.  Government‐sponsored Future Centres also can act as neutral platforms allowing  public policy makers and local communities to interact, share ideas and discuss  better policy making in an open and non‐pressurized manner.      Future Centre was first started in Sweden in the 1990s by Skandia, a private  insurance company. They have since spread to many countries across the world  particularly  in  Europe.  As  an  example,  there  are  five  government‐sponsored  Future Centres for the Public Sector x  in the Netherlands:   o The Country House  ‐‐ a facility ‘for creative and innovative work in  national  government’,  a  joint  venture  of  four  ministries:  Economic  Affairs,  The  Interior,  Finance,  and  Housing,  Spatial  Planning  &  the  Environment;  o Mobilion ‐‐ a Future Center prototype at the Department of Public  Works & Water Management;  o Future Center ‘The Shipyard' ‐‐ at the Tax & Customs Administration;  o Castle  Groeneveld  ‐‐  National  Center  for  Forests,  Nature  and  Landscape, of the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality;  o Academy SZW  ‐‐ part of the Ministry of Social Affairs & Employment.      The  Dutch  Government‐sponsored  Future  Centres  are  good  examples  where government departments serve as a convener or orchestrator that brings  public  and  private  participants  together  to  solve  problems  and  pursue  opportunities together.       
  • 7. 7    Crowdsourcing for democracyxi     The future centre movement in Finland took a slightly different turn. The  initiative was sponsored by the Committee for the Future of the Parliament of  Finland in 1993. In the same year, the Finnish Parliament started commissioning  research on topics that are relevant or challenging to the future of Finland. The  Committee gives systematic foresight to the government and parliament as well  as to people in public administration. Finland has a system of several foresight  units and processes. The Prime Minister's Office prepares a government foresight  report  in  each  electorate  period.  This  government  foresight  report  is  then  submitted to the Parliament. This facilitates the formulation of a national strategy  on high‐interest topics that would guarantee the success of the nation. Previous  topics  Finland  looked  into  includes:  sustainable  knowledge  society,  information  society, smart city, clean technology, media and communications.xii       People’s participation through crowdsourcing does not replace traditional  democratic tools or experts, but complements and supports them. Participation  can yield better decisions. A thousand pairs of eyes will spot potential problems  easier and a thousand heads will come up with more new ideas than just a few.  Instead of the highly confrontational public consultation process, crowdsourcing  is  a  participatory  method  to  engage  citizens  in  political  processes.  Citizens  are  invited  to  share  their  ideas,  perspectives  and  opinions  about  matters  that  traditionally were beyond their access and influence.        Crowdsourcing  is  a  tool  to  gather  collective  intelligence.  It  help  steer  thinking  away  from  the  "Not  Invented  Here"  syndrome.  The  tool  discovers  knowledge, wisdom and insight from the "crowd".  Most of the services provided  are on a voluntary basis. But some tasks, such as compiling reports and turning  reports  into  useful  policy  inputs,  are  also  provided  as  paid  services.  In  some  countries, crowdsourcing is used by international monitoring agencies as a tool to  detect election fraud.  It also has product development and product innovation  applications.  Large  pharmaceutical  companies  in  the  USA  often  ask  practicing  doctors to suggest cancer drug cocktail solutions on cancer treatments. Proctor 
  • 8. 8    and  Gamble  also  crowdsource  from  non‐experts  and  consumers  for  novelty  solutions.       From  the  viewpoint  of  how  to  improve  governance  in  Hong  Kong,  crowdsourcing in policy making is probably the most useful application. In Europe,  it  is  often  used  in  listening  to  citizens’  opinions  and  gathering  information.  In  2010,  crowdsourcing was  used  in  Iceland to facilitate the  constitutional  reform  process.  The  process  brought  new  perspectives  and  implanted  knowledge  and  information  to  the  "crowd"  in  an  unpressurized  environment.  It  also  raised  awareness  amongst  citizens  in  the  democratic  and  policy‐making  process.    A  similar method was also used in Chicago and in Calgary in the budget preparation  process, in the "National Dialogue" initiated by President Obama of the United  States,  in  Citizen  petition  sites  in  the  UK  and  in  Australia  and  in  the  "Open  Ministry" in Finland.       Crowdsourcing  has  very  direct  impact  on  the  democratic  process  in  democratic countries. It brings in a mixed bag of amateur and expert opinions.  Information  and  expert  knowledge  also  flows  out  to  citizens  in  an  opened  process. This process also allows citizens to have access in the policy‐formulation  process  and  therefore  the  decision‐making  process.  At  the  same  time,  policy‐ makers  learn  citizens'  values, concerns  and  attitudes.   Opening up the  political  process through crowdsourcing increases legitimacy in the political process.       However,  it  does  not  replace  the  normal  process  ‐‐  such  as  the  expert  hearings  in  the  legislative  process  or  even  the  standard  advisory  committees  practiced in Hong Kong. However, in the case of Hong Kong, it could be used as a  more  effective  public  engagement,  policy‐making  and  even  conflict  resolution  tool.              Current public engagement capacity in Hong Kong In 2011, Professor Joseph Chan Cho‐wai, Co‐Convenor (Research) of Path of  Democracy was the founding director of the Centre for Civil Society and 
  • 9. 9    Governance, HKU. He took on the task of spearheading a citizen engagement  project titled: "From Consultation to Civic Engagement: The Road to Better Policy‐ making and Governance in Hong Kong".       The  Efficiency  Unit  (EU)  of  the  Chief  Secretary's  Office  of  HKSAR  Government has been exploring the feasibility of a government‐sponsored Future  Centre  since  2010.  The  EU  sees  Future  Centre  as  stimulations  to  cross‐ departmental  government  innovation  with  a  future  orientation.  The  Future  Centre practice also integrates creative problem solving, organizational learning,  knowledge creation, and organizational change and renewal by using the wisdom  of crowds. The EU organized a "Future Centre in Public Service" workshop in April  2011, and has also sent staff to attend Aalto Camp for Societal Innovation held at  the Aalto University in Finland in August 2011. Mr. Kim Salkeld, current Head of  The  Efficiency  Unit,  is  keen  to  implement  the  concept  but  he  also  said  he  is  probably  the  only  one  who  is  talking  about  the  idea  within  the  HKSAR  Government.  Learning  from  the  U.S.  and  other  countries'  experience,  OGCIO  commented in Oct 2012 that open data could play a role in crowd sourcing ideas  from the public to co‐create solutions to solve social problems.       Activities of the Future Centre would include community discussion, forums  or other facilitated public engagement activities to gauge public views on specific  legislation  and  on  government  projects.  Discussion  forums  are  facilitated  and  moderated by skilled facilitators so that participants are encouraged to let go of  assumptions and mistrust, not to accept easy answers and to maintain their drive  to  co‐create  innovative  solutions  to  complex  social  and  economic  problems.  Future Centres allow participants and facilitators to think out of the box and inject  positive  energy  into  public  policy  making,  which  means  they  are  freed  from  previous biases/prejudices and formalities.  Citizens can help to identify the 'blind  spots'  or  'gaps'  which  have  been  overlooked  by  the  government  in  policy  formulation.   
  • 10. 10    Government-sponsored Future Centre as a conflict resolution toolxiii     The way we describe our history is of key importance in determining what  future possibilities are open to us.  A generation or two ago, Hong Kong would  readily accept decisions made hierarchically as good decision. Leadership in Hong  Kong was one‐sided ‐‐ those in positions of power know what is best for Hong  Kong. These "old" leaders acted unilaterally and pushed through solutions which  they truly believed were in the best interest of Hong Kong as a whole and often  created strong conflict with the community in the process ‐‐ one‐sided, top‐down  "managerial" decisions are rarely effective nowadays.       In  a  place  as  complex  as  Post‐1997  Hong  Kong,  a  new  leadership  style  where  political  and  community  leaders  knows  how  to  mediate  and  to  lead  through situations of conflict is needed. Practicing such a leadership style does  not  mean  abandoning  his  or  her  conviction,  but  it  does  mean  having  a  broad  shoulder  to  reach  out  and  to  accommodate  the  interests  of  others  and  the  interests of the society as a whole.  As difficult and as challenging as it sounds,  this "Third‐way" leadership style mediates differences and has potential to turn  conflicts into opportunities. It is not enough to have the capacity to stand up for  one's  own  interests,  but  it  is  also  important  for  Hong  Kong  to  develop  the  capacities and the platforms to reach across different interest group and to listen  to others.       In Post‐1997 Hong Kong ‐‐ particularly in the light of the latest 28 February  2016 New Territory East by‐election results, the potential for destructive conflict  is  real.    How  the  HKSAR  Government,  the  politicians  and  community  leaders  choose  to  resolve  conflicts  is  an  act  of  leadership.  Introduction  of  the  Government‐sponsored Future Centre concept into Hong Kong has potential to  turn  conflicts  into  a  driving  force  to  reform  Hong  Kong's  future  rather  than  a  liability and destructive force. Mark Gerzon, author of "Leading through Conflict"  said:  "…  if  a  handyman  came  to  your  house  to  do  home  repair  with  a  toolbox  containing nothing but hammers …  (your house) would be in a wreck!"  Someone 
  • 11. 11    need enough conviction to believe in "cross boundaries" to fix things, otherwise  Hong Kong could also be in a wreck!  Future Centre as an alternative form of democracy to improve governance     Against a complex political background and the eventual transition toward  Universal Suffrage of the Chief Executive and Legislative Council, Hong Kong will  eventually  have  to  come  to  an  agreement  on  a  policy  development  and  constitutional  framework  that  connects  the  society  to  government.  Whether  Hong Kong will be successful in its constitutional reform effort is still unclear and  it  is  still  uncertain  whether  Hong  Kong  will  be  able  to  move  forward  on  the  political development front. There is a glimpse of hope that might work in Hong  Kong's favour ‐‐ since China is also going through rapid changes, it will have no  choice but to look into a more representative form of government to solve many  social  conflicts  and  governance  problem  in  its  economic  development.  Perhaps  the Mainland is willing to borrow successful ideas ‐‐ such as from Hong Kong's  experiment in practicing the Government‐sponsor Future Centre. Both Hong Kong  and Mainland China will have much to gain if Hong Kong could position itself as a  liberal and more advanced territory in China that is more ready than the Mainland  to resolve differences in an open and democratic manner ‐‐ not a place that could  subvert China.       This paper proposes that people of Hong Kong need to understand their  past in order to find a pathway for the future. The first Government‐sponsored  Future Centre could be set up in a historical building ‐‐ a setting that connects  participants of the Government‐sponsored Future Centre to the collective social  memory of Hong Kong's different communities across time. The old setting of a  historical  building  would  naturally  lead  participants  to  imagine  what  had  happened  in  the  past  and  thus  create new  meaning  from  past  history  through  rational and innovative discussions.              
  • 12. 12                                                                 References:    i  From Functional Constituencies to Party Dictatorship, From a British Political Idea to British Political Practice,  HKDF speaker luncheon by Professor Tony Carty, 21 December 2009   (http://www.hkdf.org/newsarticles.asp?show=newsarticles&newsarticle=255)    ii   http://www.scmp.com/business/economy/article/1425676/public‐trust‐government‐andbusiness‐falling‐says‐ survey    iii   Speech by Mr. Lam Woon‐kwong, "Towards better policy‐making in Hong Kong" at speaker luncheon organized  by the Hong Kong Democratic Foundation on 7 January 2011:  (http://www.hkdf.org/newsarticles.asp?show=newsarticles&newsarticle=291)    iv   Lung, Alan Ka‐lun(2003). Review of the Role and Functions of Public Sector Advisory and Statutory Bodies (29  May 2003, www.hkdf.org)     v   Chan, J. (2007). From Consultation to Civic Engagement: The Road to Better Policy‐making and Governance in  Hong Kong. Prepared by Centre for Civil Society and Governance, the University of Hong Kong and commissioned  by Bauhinia Foundation Research Centre.    vi Governing Hong Kong: Insights from the British Declassified Files, Oxford University Press, 2012; 李彭廣, 香港的管治團隊: 英治時期的運作與回歸後的更新,   vii   2016 Policy Address of the HKSAR Government.     viii   Lam Woon‐kwong's speech at the Hong Kong Democratic Foundation, 7 January 2011.    ix   The Future Centre Alliance (http://summit.futurecentres.com/history/) acts as a focus for future centres from  around the world.    x   Kune, H. (2004).  Five Dutch Future Centers for the Public Sector.    xi  Crowdsourcing for Demcracy: A New Era in Policy‐making, published by the Committee for th Future of the  Parliament of Finland.     xii   Ulla Rosenström and Nicolas Balcom Raleigh. (2015). Inclusive Foresight for Finland.    xiii  Mark Gerzon, Leading through Conflict ‐‐ How Successful Leaders Tranform Diffenceces into Opportunities,  Harvard Business School Press (2006)