Delegation

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Delegation

  1. 1. DELEGATION Fundamental aspect of manager’s job; Transferring a task or procedure to someone else!
  2. 2. Delegation: “Transferring responsibility for the performance of an activity from one individual to another while retaining the accountability for the outcome”
  3. 3. Supervision: “ Providing guidance for the accomplishment of a task or activity with direction, periodic inspection of accomplishment”…“function of qualification”
  4. 4. WHAT DELEGATION IS NOT <ul><li>“dumping” work indiscriminately </li></ul><ul><li>giving orders </li></ul><ul><li>abdicating control or responsibility </li></ul>
  5. 5. Delegation implies that the subordinate is given the authority to do the job, can make independent decisions, and has the responsibility for seeing that the job is done well.
  6. 6. Delegation involves: <ul><li>Determination of the task to be accomplished </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment of each person’s competency </li></ul><ul><li>Amount of decision making needed </li></ul><ul><li>Level of supervision available </li></ul>
  7. 7. SIX PRINCIPLES OF DELEGATION <ul><li>1. Know yourself and team members </li></ul><ul><li>2. Assess strengths, weaknesses, job, situation and skills </li></ul><ul><li>3. Understand the state practice act, limitations, and job descriptions </li></ul><ul><li>4. Know the job requirements </li></ul><ul><li>5. Keep communication clear, complete and constant </li></ul><ul><li>6. Evaluate-review what happened/measure results </li></ul>
  8. 8. FOUR BASIC STEPS: <ul><li>1. Select a capable person </li></ul><ul><li>2. Explain the task and outcomes to occur </li></ul><ul><li>3. Give the necessary authority and means for doing the job </li></ul><ul><li>4. Arrange to keep in contact and give feedback. </li></ul>
  9. 9. VERBAL AND WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS AND/OR DETAILS
  10. 10. MAKING THE DECISION TO DELEGATE: <ul><li>the potential for harm </li></ul><ul><li>the complexity of the nursing activity </li></ul><ul><li>the required problem solving and innovation </li></ul><ul><li>the predictability of the outcome </li></ul><ul><li>the extent of client interaction </li></ul>
  11. 11. RIGHTS! <ul><li>Right task </li></ul><ul><li>Right person </li></ul><ul><li>Right communication </li></ul><ul><li>Right feedback </li></ul>CRUCIAL LEGAL ISSUE REMAINS NURSING JUDGMENT
  12. 12. PITFALLS OF DELEGATION <ul><li>Manager’s reluctance to “give away” </li></ul><ul><li>Feeling that need to do it yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of confidence in subordinate </li></ul><ul><li>Fear of losing authority </li></ul><ul><li>Name others! </li></ul>
  13. 13. Legal Aspects of Delegation <ul><li>Age old fear of what a nurse can be sued for! </li></ul><ul><li>Delegation is part of the nurse’s role </li></ul><ul><li>Nurse assumes responsibility for supervision, whether physically present or not </li></ul><ul><li>Liability if found negligent in the process of delegating and supervisiong </li></ul><ul><li>Nursing judgment should not be delegated </li></ul>
  14. 14. ACCOUNTABILITY “Being obligated to answer for one’s acts, including the act of supervision.”
  15. 15. “ ...DUTY AND OBLIGATION TO ACT IN THE EVENT OF A BREAKDOWN IN CLIENT CARE WHEREVER IN THE CHAIN THAT BREAKDOWN OCCURS.”
  16. 16. LEADERS/MANAGERS SHOULD NEVER ATTEMPT TO DELEGATE: <ul><li>Personal accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Discipline of employees </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition and praise/actions associated with morale and related motivation </li></ul>

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