Introduction to wine presentation

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State of the art Wine presentation of wine service

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  • TALKING POINTS:
  • Introduction to wine presentation

    1. 1. Introduction to Wine Wine
    2. 2. Wine
    3. 3. Wine
    4. 4. Wine
    5. 5. Wine
    6. 6. Wine
    7. 7. Wine
    8. 8. Wine
    9. 9. Wine
    10. 10. Wine Service:
    11. 11. Tasting TemperaturesWine should be tasted at the same temperature at which they would be served for a meal •Some prefer high-acid reds (Beaujolais, Barbera, Chianti) to be chilled as well
    12. 12. Wine Temperatures
    13. 13. Service Protocol
    14. 14. Service Protocol
    15. 15. Service Protocol
    16. 16. Service Protocol
    17. 17. Service Protocol
    18. 18. Service Protocol
    19. 19. Service Protocol
    20. 20. Service Protocol
    21. 21. Service Protocol
    22. 22. Service Protocol
    23. 23. Service Protocol
    24. 24. Service Protocol
    25. 25. Breathing and Decanting
    26. 26. Breathing and Decanting
    27. 27. Breathing and Decanting
    28. 28. Breathing and Decanting
    29. 29. Breathing and Decanting
    30. 30. Breathing and Decanting
    31. 31. Storage
    32. 32. Introduction to Wine
    33. 33. FERMENTATIONSUGAR + YEAST = ALCOHOL + CO2
    34. 34. Wine Tasting
    35. 35. Sommelier/Wine Steward
    36. 36. Wine-serving Temperatures
    37. 37. Wine Service
    38. 38. Wine Service
    39. 39. Wine Training & Tasting Benefits
    40. 40. Wine List
    41. 41. White Grapes There are 50 major white grapes grown in the world today, 24 in California alone. The three most important grapes are listed here, ranked by texture from lightest to most full-bodied. European wines will usually be identified by their appellation; elsewhere wines will be identified by varietal. Grapes Where they grow best Riesling Germany; Alsace, France; New York State Sauvignon Blanc Loire Valley, France; Bordeaux, France; New Zealand; California (Fumé Blanc) Chardonnay Burgundy, France; California; Australia; Champagne, France Other significant white wine grapes, listed alphabetically: Grapes Where they grow best Albariño Spain Chenin Blanc Loire Valley, France; California; Gewürztraminer Alsace, France Pinot Grigio/Gris Italy, Alsace, France Sémillon Bordeaux (Sauternes), France; Australia Viognier Rhone, France; California
    42. 42. Champagne & Sparkling Styles
    43. 43. Sparkling Wines & Champagne
    44. 44. Rosé Wines
    45. 45. Dessert, Fortified & Fruit Wines
    46. 46. Dessert, Fortified & Fruit Wines
    47. 47. Sherry
    48. 48. Sherry
    49. 49. Fruit Infused
    50. 50. Fruit Infused
    51. 51. Port
    52. 52. Port
    53. 53. Dessert Wines
    54. 54. Wine Tasting
    55. 55. Defining Taste
    56. 56. Defining Taste
    57. 57. So why learn to taste effectively using sensory evaluation techniques?
    58. 58. Remember that a quality wine comes from the following:
    59. 59. Wines with superior quality
    60. 60. Sensory Evaluation
    61. 61. Sensory Evaluation
    62. 62. The Natural Tasting Sequence
    63. 63. Hearing
    64. 64. Sight
    65. 65. Sight
    66. 66. Sight
    67. 67. Sight
    68. 68. Smell
    69. 69. Smell
    70. 70. Smell
    71. 71. Smell
    72. 72. Wine has three facets
    73. 73. 2) Aroma
    74. 74. 3) Bouquet
    75. 75. Touch (Tactile Response)
    76. 76. 2) Astringency or Acid Content
    77. 77. 2) Astringency or Acid Content
    78. 78. Astringenc y Wheel
    79. 79. Common Wine AcidsAcid Source CharacteristicsTartaric Grape Hard, tart, aftertaste in throat, coats teethMalic Grape Green appleCitric Grape Citrus touch, rare in wineAcetic Fermentation Vinegary tasteLactic Fermentation and Soft, buttery, malo/lactic fermentation cheese aromaSuccinic Fermentation Stable, winey acid
    80. 80. Taste
    81. 81. Sugar Levels
    82. 82. Sugar Levels Description Residual Sugar after Fermentation Dry 0.1-6.0 g/lMedium Dry 7-15 g/lMedium Sweet 18-30 g/l Sweet 30-50 g/l Very Sweet 60 + g/l Sweetness Levels (10 g/l = 1% sugar)
    83. 83. White Wine Balance
    84. 84. White Wine Balance
    85. 85. Red WineBalanc e
    86. 86. Red WineBalance
    87. 87. Red WineBalance
    88. 88. RedWineBalance

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