p305_pp01

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p305_pp01

  1. 1. Criminal Justice 2011Class Name,Instructor NameDate, SemesterChapter 1:Criminal Justice andthe Study of Morality
  2. 2. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedHEADLINES OF INTRIGUE• Genarlow Wilson• Armin Meiwes• Kathryn Johnston2
  3. 3. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedETHICS AND MORALITY• What is morally “right,” “wrong,” “good,” “bad,”“obligatory,” and “permissible;• Effort to understand and justify moral concepts,principles, and theories;• Effort to establish principles of moral behavior that canserve as guides;• Investigating important values and virtues for leadingand living the “good” life.3
  4. 4. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedTHE MORAL PROBLEM OF PUNISHMENT• How can we justify intentionally inflicting evilupon other human beings?• What justifications can you think of forpunishing criminals?• What justifications might exist for dealing withcriminal offenders in ways other thanpunishment?4
  5. 5. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedNEVER KILL AN INNOCENTHUMAN BEING• Is this a worthwhile principle?• Are there legitimate exceptions and why?• Does the concept conflict with other importantprinciples?• Do some “trump” others when there is a conflict?• Who decides this and by what process?• What if killing an innocent human being can save thelives of ten other innocent human beings?• What is a “human being”?• What constitutes innocence?5
  6. 6. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedWHY ETHICS WHEN WE HAVE LAWS?• Laws Can Be Immoral• Laws Are Not Infallible• Right Does Not Always Make Good• Law Is Not Inclusive of All Moral Concerns• It Is Not Enough to Do the Right Thing• Jury Nullification6
  7. 7. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedMORALITY, ETHICAL INQUIRY,& CRIMINAL JUSTICE• Criminal Justice Practice• Laws and Lawmaking• Social Justice7
  8. 8. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedMORAL REQUIREMENTS OFCRIMINAL JUSTICE• Authority• Power• Discretion8
  9. 9. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedMORAL REQUIREMENTS INCRIMINAL JUSTICE• Criminal Justice Agents as PublicServants• Individual Behavior Reflects InstitutionalMorality9
  10. 10. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedPROFESSIONAL CODE OF CONDUCT1. Enforcement2. Minimalism3. Codes Are External4. Ethics Are Internal5. Moral Dilemmas6. Discretion7. Limited practical utility8. Situational factors10
  11. 11. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedMORALITY and ETHICAL INQUIRY• What is “justice” and a “just” society?• What is the “good” life?• How does morality function to promote justice (or failto do so)?• How does morality further our interest in living a goodlife?• How does morality further our interest in living a goodlife?11

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