Criminal Justice 2011Class Name,Instructor NameDate, Semester
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedJUSTIFYING BELIEFS AND DE...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedCAPACITY TO REASONDefinin...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedCRITICAL THINKING• Critic...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedCRITICAL THINKINGThe Goal...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedACCOMPLISHING THESE GOALS...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedUNCRITICAL THINKING• Acce...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedLIVING THE EXAMINED LIFE•...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedAVOIDING ERRORS IN JUDGME...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedEVALUATING BELIEFS AND DE...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedWHAT TO AVOID• Assumption...
© 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedGUIDELINES FOR THE ETHICA...
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  • p. 212. Very important - The ethical life requires good decisions, and good decisions are justified decisions. • we must assess reasons for all possible alternatives, choosing the alternative that is supported by the best reasons. Moral Reasons Are Different from Personal Reasons Personal reasons for decisions appeal to our personal needs, desires, emotions, and interests. Personal Reasons Are Not Sufficient Reasons for Moral Decisions. P ersonal reasons are not sufficient to justify decisions with moral implications Good Reasons Are the Result of Careful, Rational, and Unbiased Consideration. Most can offer a variety of reasons for our beliefs and decisions, closer examination oftentimes reveals that our reasons are flawed. Ethical Frameworks Serve as Base. Moral reasons often stem from ethical frameworks. Moral reasons may appeal to the consequences of our actions for other people, to moral duties or principles.
  • pp. 213-214. Reasoning refers to any process whereby we apply available information such as evidence or principles (i.e., reasons) to a question, issue, or dilemma in the interest of reaching a conclusion. Theoretical or pure reasoning involves deciding what we should or ought to believe . When we reason theoretically, we are not figuring out what we should do in a given situation, but attempting to reach conclusions about morally responsible beliefs. Thus, theoretical reasoning is what guides our thinking . For example, s hould the value of life outweigh the value of choice? Should the virtue of loyalty be held in higher esteem than that of honesty? Are the consequences of our actions more important than our moral duties? Is the goal of our system of corrections to deter would-be criminals? To rehabilitate? Or, exact vengeance? Are nonviolent strategies of conflict resolution more desirable than violent ones? Practical reasoning involves deciding what we should or ought to do . We involve ourselves in practical reasoning anytime we deliberate an action. Thus, practical reasoning is what guides our actions. Assists us in applying values, beliefs, and principles to “practical” situations. If rehabilitation is determined to be a desirable end or goal for our system of corrections, practical reasoning is necessary to determine the best method to achieve this outcome. • Law enforcement officers are sometimes forced to choose between loyalty and telling the truth in a court. An ethical dilemma can materialize when concerns are raised about investigative techniques or respect for the rights of suspects. Reasoning helps to clarify and evaluate the options we possess, enabling us to make more informed (and “better”) decisions. • If nonviolent strategies of conflict resolution are more desirable than violent strategies, we need practical reasoning to tell us how to apply nonviolent strategies in a given situation or with regard to a given issue.
  • p. 215.
  • p. 215. GOALS understanding and evaluating reasoning , including existing and proposed laws, policies, and court decisions; (2) making well-reasoned choices and decisions, both in our personal lives and in professional contexts; and (3) being fair-minded, avoiding the traps or pitfalls of emotion, convention, and other problematic—though common—influences on moral judgments and decisions.
  • p. 215 Accomplishing These Goals Requires a Good Mind-Set Coupled with an Understanding of How Reasoning Works and Where It Can Go Wrong. recognize uncritical thinking in ourselves and others; (2) be willing to explore ways unseen; (3) recognize and seek to avoid common errors in reasoning and judgment, including assumptions , errors of relevance , and errors of evidence ; (4) be able, on at least a basic level, to evaluate our own reasoning and that of others; and (5) be able, on at least a basic level, to apply moral principles and ethical frameworks to issues, situations, and dilemmas of ethical relevance.
  • p. 216 It Is Easy to Become Imprisoned by Favored Ways of Seeing the World. We too easily slip into habits of thought, belief, opinion, preconception, prejudice, stereotype , and the like. We Think “Uncritically” When We Accept Ideas, Opinions, and Beliefs without Carefully Assessing Their Merit. Plato’s cave demonstrates the need to think rather than accept things as they appear or are given/taught/preached to us. This is the means to escape the state of being confined in a “cave” of ideas and opinions that we have accepted but left unexamined. Socialization and Experience Tend to Provide Us with a Limited and Incomplete Portrait of Ourselves, Others, and the World in Which We Exist. Beginning at a very young age, we unknowingly absorb the ideas and opinions that are presented to us. We are largely passive products of our socialization and environment, digesting almost everything our parents, teachers, religious leaders, and others tell us. The Ethical Life Requires That We Develop Our Own Reasons for Beliefs, Opinions, Decisions, and Actions. The value of socialization and experience is not all bad. Much of what we are taught and learn from personal experience has value. We should first recognize that we accept a good many ideas and opinions without deciding their merits ourselves. Ways of Seeing Can Become Ways of Not Seeing. When trapped in favored ways of seeing, people become unable or unwilling to consider other perspectives.
  • pp. 218-219
  • Conclusions and reasons are the basic units of the reasoning process. A conclusion is the “point” of the reasoning process. Conclusions can be beliefs or opinions that are upheld or adopted; they can be laws or policies that are implemented; they can be decisions that are reached or actions that are taken. In short, the conclusion is whatever it is that is the point, aim, or purpose of the reasoning process. Good Beliefs and Ethical Decisions Require That Two Conditions Be Met. Require that: (1) the reasons that lead us to have the belief or make the decision are true, or acceptable and (2) the conclusion follows from the reasons. When these two conditions are met, we can say that a belief, opinion, law, policy, decision is good and justified. Inference Is the Process of Connecting Reasons to Conclusions.
  • P. 222. Always be aware of assumptions that we or others may be making. Assumptions are not always a problem in critical thinking and ethical decision-making. They may be correct. AVOIDING ERRORS OF RELEVANCE. The Use and Abuse of Authority. Authorities are common sources of belief, and authority is a common justification for decisions and judgments. Appeals to authority typically rely on social institutions (e.g., laws, Constitutions), public opinion, social and cultural customs and conventions, religious teachers, and scientific and moral “experts.” The Use and Abuse of Tradition. Tradition refers to an established way of doing things. When we make an appeal to tradition, the reason that we offer in support of a belief or decision appeals to the longevity of the belief, law, practice, and the like.
  • pp. 228-229. In making decisions, make sure your decisions are justified (i.e., are backed by good reasons). • Avoid making decisions based on self-interest or the interests of a group to which you belong (e.g., race, gender, religion, political affiliation). • Avoid becoming trapped in favored ways of seeing the world. • Recognize that many of your existing beliefs, ideas, and opinions are likely limited and incomplete. • Seek to develop moral autonomy, developing your own reasons for beliefs and decisions. • Practice “taking a step back” to see what is in front of you. • Maintain a healthy, but selectively employed, amount of skepticism. • Keep an open mind, avoiding dogmatism and defensive posturing. • Avoid making assumptions. • Avoid relying on authority as the sole reason for ethical beliefs and decisions. • Avoid relying on tradition or convention as the sole source of ethical beliefs or reason for decisions. Avoid making too much of public opinion. • Avoid making decisions solely on the basis of emotions, passions, and desires. • Before making generalizations, make sure you have observed a sufficient number and variety of cases. • Follow, do not dismiss, good reasons and evidence. • Do not exclude important sources of information or evidence simply because they do not support preformed ideas. • Do not add harm or evil to already-existing harm or evil by responding to a wrong with another wrong. • Stay focused on relevant information. • Keep in mind that lack of proof does not disprove, and lack of disproof does not prove. • Avoid black-and-white thinking, thinking dichotomously, and seeing through categories and labels. • Finally, strive for consistency in moral beliefs and ethical decisions. • Making an effort to “know thyself” and live an “examined life” will go a long way toward ensuring that you adopt and maintain good moral beliefs and that you make good and consistent ethical decisions.
  • p305_pp11

    1. 1. Criminal Justice 2011Class Name,Instructor NameDate, Semester
    2. 2. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedJUSTIFYING BELIEFS AND DECISIONS• Moral Reasons vs. Personal Reasons• Personal Reasons - not sufficient for moraldecisions• Good Reasons - result of careful, rational, andunbiased consideration• Ethical frameworks serves as bases for thinkingabout reasons2
    3. 3. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedCAPACITY TO REASONDefining Reasoning•Two basic types of reasoning:- Theoretical or pure reasoning (thought)- Practical reasoning (applies to realsituations)•An ethical life requires both types•Effective reasoning requires skills and tools withwhich to work3
    4. 4. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedCRITICAL THINKING• Critical Thinking - the “Activity of Reason• Definition: “the process to use our innatecapacity for rational thought to make gooddecisions, and justify and assess beliefs,principles, laws, policies.”4
    5. 5. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedCRITICAL THINKINGThe Goals of Critical Thinking(1)understanding and evaluating reasoning(2)making well-reasoned choices and decisions(3)being fair-minded, avoiding the pitfalls ofemotion, convention, and other influences5
    6. 6. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedACCOMPLISHING THESE GOALSWe must be able to:1.Recognize uncritical thinking2.Explore ways unseen3.Avoid common errors in reasoning andjudgment4.Evaluate our own reasoning and that of others5.Apply moral principles and ethical frameworksto issues and dilemmas6
    7. 7. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedUNCRITICAL THINKING• Accepting ideas without assessing their merit• Socialization and experience – limits ourportrait of the world• The ethical life requires beliefs by self-reasoning• Seeing can become ways of not seeing• Critical thinking requires an open-mindedapproach to issues7
    8. 8. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedLIVING THE EXAMINED LIFE• Requires a regular step back to seewhat is ahead• Requires that we maintain a healthydegree of skepticism• Requires that we keep an open mind• Requires that we see beyondcategories and stereotypes, and waysof separating8
    9. 9. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedAVOIDING ERRORS IN JUDGMENT• Conclusions and Reasons• Good beliefs and ethical decisionsrequire two conditions be met• Inference9
    10. 10. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedEVALUATING BELIEFS AND DECISIONS• Identify the main conclusion• Identify the reasons offered in support of theconclusion• Identify any problematic assumptionsembedded in the reasoning• Determine whether reasons are true• Determine whether reasons support theconclusion10
    11. 11. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedWHAT TO AVOID• Assumptions• Errors of relevance• Errors of evidence• Hasty Induction• Forgetful Induction• Slothful Induction• ExclusionOther common errors• Two wrongs don’t make a right; be consistent• Stay focused; avoid black-and-white thinking11
    12. 12. © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, IncUpper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights ReservedGUIDELINES FOR THE ETHICAL LIFE• Go to pages 228 and 229 of your text• Make two columns: one column ofitems that you believe are easy tofollow and one column that may notbe so easy to follow12

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