Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Mapping digital competence

284 views

Published on

In 2018, Deloitte Centre for the Edge & Geelong Grammar School published "From coding to competence", developing the idea of digital competence that was first outlined in "To code or not to code, is that the question?" While it's important to know how to use the technology, digital literacy, it's more important to understand when and why to use the technology, digital competence.

The essay proposed a framework for understanding and teaching digital competence. The framework remains incomplete though, and needs to be populated with examples of digital competence before it is useful.

This project, "Mapping digital competence", attempts to populate the framework by asking the following question:

How might teaching digital competence manifest across the educational strata (K-12, post-secondary, vocational, industry…)?

or, put another way:

What are the attributes of a graduate (from each of the educational strata) that represent digital competence, and how might they be taught?

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Mapping digital competence

  1. 1. Mapping digital competence To code or not to code? Peter Evans-Greenwood, Deloitte Consulting Pty Ltd, 2018-10-01
  2. 2. 2 In 2018, Deloitte Centre for the Edge & Geelong Grammar School published From coding to competence, developing the idea of digital competence that was first outlined in To code or not to code, is that the question?* The essay proposed a framework for understanding and teaching digital competence. The framework remains incomplete though, and needs to be populated with examples of digital competence before it is useful. * Evans-Greenwood, P & Patstson, T 2018, To code or not to code: From coding to competence, Deloitte Australia.
  3. 3. 3 This project, Mapping digital competence, attempts to populate the framework by asking the following question: How might teaching digital competence manifest across the educational strata (K-12, post-secondary, vocational, industry…)? or, put another way: What are the attributes of a graduate (from each of the educational strata) that represent digital competence, and how might they be taught?
  4. 4. 4 • digital literacy*: possessing the language to interact with digital platforms (understanding the symbols, metaphors and affordances of digital devices and interfaces) • digital capability*: knowing how to use particular digital tools (the ability to apply a digital tool to a task) • digital competency*: knowing when and why to use / interact with digital tools (the attitudes and behaviours required to have an effective relationship with particular tool) The attributes of digital competence * one aim of this project is refining the terminology
  5. 5. 5 … where competency is multidimensional … works for … … works with … … works on … Direction A human is under the direction of a machine, the machine assigning work & assessing quality. Ride-sharing driver, pick-n- pack in a distribution centre, welfare recipient. Machine augmentation A human monitors a machine’s work, stepping in when the machine is out of its depth. A safety driver monitoring an autonomous vehicle. Instruction A human teaches an old dog new tricks. A ‘truck driver’ teaches autonomous trucks to park in the loading bays at a new distribution centre. Shared agency Human & machine with inter-dependant work. A district nurse managing their time with a work management system assigning new work. Synthesis Human & machine collaborate to identify, delineate, define, explore and solve a problem. Freestyle chess is the exemplar. Bricolage Human & machine behaviours are integrated to create a new solution. Overcoming ‘learned helplessness’ to combine existing tools and create new solutions. Shepherding A team of machines work for a human, where the human assigns the work, monitors progress, and assesses the result. A ForEx trader managing a team of trading ‘bots. Human augmentation A machine supports a humans work, identifying options, highlighting bias, etc. An oncologist using a machine to identify potential tumours. A judge and a sentence recommendation tool. Guidance A machine helps an old dog learn new tricks. A self- paced learning solution manages a student’s progression through a MOOC. Human…machineHuman&machineMachine…human
  6. 6. Small-DC 6 A developmental trajectory Little-DC The accidental competence of ‘digital natives’ The collaborative digital competence required to navigate a community The deliberative digital competence of the professional The considered digital competence of the exceptional individual An informal understanding of popular digital tools Able to negotiate the use of common digital tools with acquaintances Capable of applying known digital tools to new tasks in the pursuit of their work Mastery, combining tools from different domains to discover new ways of working Limited knowledge of particular digital platforms Some knowledge of common platforms Knowledge of relevant platforms Extensive knowledge of a broad range of platforms Applying particular tools to particular tasks (‘learned helplessness’) Apply similar tools to similar tasks and an understanding of their implications (privacy etc.) Applying known tools to new tasks, discovering new tools and the ability to discern their intentions (algorithms) Combining existing tools to create new solutions to new problems, moving tools between domains Only uses digital tools when and as directed Recognises when tools could be used, using tools in their proscribed manner Recognises when a tool should be used, and has purposeful interactions with the tool Realises when new tools are required, and shaped works habits / practices to suit Pro-DC Big-DC LiteracyCapabilityCompetency
  7. 7. 7 digital native | ˈdɪdʒɪt(ə)l ˈneɪtɪv | noun a person with accidental knowledge of digital platforms, who can apply particular tools to known tasks, only using digital tools when, as and how they are directed: the digital native suffers from learned helplessness as they can only apply digital tools that they already know to tasks they already understand
  8. 8. Educational Intervention Common digital competence attributes Educational Intervention Common digital competence attributes Educational Intervention Common digital competence attributes 8 Our approach Map what digital competence might look like at key points in a selection of careers, identify commonalities in digital competence at each career stage, and sketch how digital competence might be taught at each level of existing curricula Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies Name Description Digital literacies Digital capabilities Digital competencies
  9. 9. 9 A workshop Groups take one persona and enumerate it, creating a new persona at each waypoint in the individual’s career, such as completion of a period of formal education, industry certification, or even a change in career. Groups develop personas for the individuals in a scenario. A persona describes the individual’s goals and the work context, along with their digital literacies, capabilities and competencies. Activity Scenarios → Personas Persona → Career path Groups take one period of formal education, collect the enumerated persona corresponding to that period, and create a consolidated view of what attributes an individual might be expected to acquire in that layer. Career stage → Digital competence Group take the set of attributes and draft a lesson plan, showing existing subjects might be ‘reframed’* to instil digital competence in the students. Digital competence → Intervention * Refer to page 23 of Evans-Greenwood, P & Patstson, T 2018, To code or not to code: From coding to competence, Deloitte Australia.
  10. 10. Prior to workshops 10 The project During workshops After the workshops A suitably diverse set of scenarios are developed, where each scenario describes the roles, relationships, responsibilities and activities – an ethnographic drama – of a work situation in the near future. A national series of workshops, each with 24-36 participants. Each workshop is provided with four scenarios to investigate. The scenarios may or may not be related to each other. The domains the scenarios represent will be used to guide selection of participants for the workshop. Each workshop will generate set of enumerated persona and lesson plans. The persona – master, journeyman, graduate… – developed in each workshop are integrated to create a single picture of digital competence across a range of careers and domains, a mudmap of digital competence.
  11. 11. This publication contains general information only, and none of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, its member firms, or their related entities (collectively the “Deloitte Network”) is, by means of this publication, rendering professional advice or services. Before making any decision or taking any action that may affect your finances or your business, you should consult a qualified professional adviser. No entity in the Deloitte Network shall be responsible for any loss whatsoever sustained by any person who relies on this publication. © 2018 Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

×