Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Phonics lessons

48,564 views

Published on

Phonics Lessons is a complete 61 lessons course for teaching beginning readers to read and spell.

Published in: Education
  • Update on Ace - I have gotten him involved in playing some of the games and I can see a difference in his confidence already! My other dog played along and he became intrigued - now its a daily part of our routine - about 3 times a day we do the shell game and the muffin tin game. I am so grateful for coming upon your training techniques! ●●● http://ishbv.com/brainydogs/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Go here now to unlock your dog's natural intelligence today. ▲▲▲ http://t.cn/Aie4mTQb
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • DOWNLOAD THIS BOOKS INTO AVAILABLE FORMAT (2019 Update) ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... Download Full PDF EBOOK here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download Full EPUB Ebook here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download Full doc Ebook here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download PDF EBOOK here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download EPUB Ebook here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download doc Ebook here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................... eBook is an electronic version of a traditional print book THIS can be read by using a personal computer or by using an eBook reader. (An eBook reader can be a software application for use on a computer such as Microsoft's free Reader application, or a book-sized computer THIS is used solely as a reading device such as Nuvomedia's Rocket eBook.) Users can purchase an eBook on diskette or CD, but the most popular method of getting an eBook is to purchase a downloadable file of the eBook (or other reading material) from a Web site (such as Barnes and Noble) to be read from the user's computer or reading device. Generally, an eBook can be downloaded in five minutes or less ......................................................................................................................... .............. Browse by Genre Available eBooks .............................................................................................................................. Art, Biography, Business, Chick Lit, Children's, Christian, Classics, Comics, Contemporary, Cookbooks, Manga, Memoir, Music, Mystery, Non Fiction, Paranormal, Philosophy, Poetry, Psychology, Religion, Romance, Science, Science Fiction, Self Help, Suspense, Spirituality, Sports, Thriller, Travel, Young Adult, Crime, Ebooks, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Historical Fiction, History, Horror, Humor And Comedy, ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... .....BEST SELLER FOR EBOOK RECOMMEND............................................................. ......................................................................................................................... Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth,-- The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company,-- Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead,-- StrengthsFinder 2.0,-- Stillness Is the Key,-- She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story THIS Helped Ignite a Movement,-- Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones,-- Everything Is Figureoutable,-- What It Takes: Lessons in the Pursuit of Excellence,-- Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money THIS the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!,-- The Total Money Makeover: Classic Edition: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness,-- Shut Up and Listen!: Hard Business Truths THIS Will Help You Succeed, ......................................................................................................................... .........................................................................................................................
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • DOWNLOAD THIS BOOKS INTO AVAILABLE FORMAT (2019 Update) ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... Download Full PDF EBOOK here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download Full EPUB Ebook here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download Full doc Ebook here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download PDF EBOOK here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download EPUB Ebook here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... Download doc Ebook here { https://soo.gd/irt2 } ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................... eBook is an electronic version of a traditional print book THIS can be read by using a personal computer or by using an eBook reader. (An eBook reader can be a software application for use on a computer such as Microsoft's free Reader application, or a book-sized computer THIS is used solely as a reading device such as Nuvomedia's Rocket eBook.) Users can purchase an eBook on diskette or CD, but the most popular method of getting an eBook is to purchase a downloadable file of the eBook (or other reading material) from a Web site (such as Barnes and Noble) to be read from the user's computer or reading device. Generally, an eBook can be downloaded in five minutes or less ......................................................................................................................... .............. Browse by Genre Available eBooks .............................................................................................................................. Art, Biography, Business, Chick Lit, Children's, Christian, Classics, Comics, Contemporary, Cookbooks, Manga, Memoir, Music, Mystery, Non Fiction, Paranormal, Philosophy, Poetry, Psychology, Religion, Romance, Science, Science Fiction, Self Help, Suspense, Spirituality, Sports, Thriller, Travel, Young Adult, Crime, Ebooks, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Historical Fiction, History, Horror, Humor And Comedy, ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... .....BEST SELLER FOR EBOOK RECOMMEND............................................................. ......................................................................................................................... Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth,-- The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company,-- Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead,-- StrengthsFinder 2.0,-- Stillness Is the Key,-- She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story THIS Helped Ignite a Movement,-- Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones,-- Everything Is Figureoutable,-- What It Takes: Lessons in the Pursuit of Excellence,-- Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money THIS the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!,-- The Total Money Makeover: Classic Edition: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness,-- Shut Up and Listen!: Hard Business Truths THIS Will Help You Succeed, ......................................................................................................................... .........................................................................................................................
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • A 7 Time Lotto Winner Stepped Up to Share His Secrets With YOU ■■■ http://t.cn/Airfq84N
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Phonics lessons

  1. 1. PPPPhhhhoooonnnniiiiccccssss LLLLeeeessssssssoooonnnnssss LLLLeeeessssssssoooonnnnssss Phonics Lessons course for teaching beginning readers is a coplete lesson to read and spell spell. freephonicslessons.com com. .
  2. 2. To minimize errors, Please use a current browser and the latest Flash Player! Introduction Welcome to my website! It is my desire to “lend a helping hand” to those involved in the art of teaching basic reading skills. I hope you’ll find these “hands-on” phonics lessons useful in the process of helping your students develop and strengthen basic reading skills. The lessons are presented in a progressive order. Originally, I created these lessons as a homework follow-up to classroom instruction. After retirement, I copied the complete set of lessons and used them for tutoring. They proved to be very effective in helping my students strengthen and further develop their basic reading and spelling skills. The common spelling patterns are listed on the long vowel chart. The lessons should not be used as an independent activity. Assisted guidance and interaction with the student is essential in following through each portion of the lessons. It is important to lend support and inspire the student as he/she pursues the task in each lesson and gains strength in the development of reading and spelling. Knowledge of sound-symbol association is a first step in learning how to read. Throughout my teaching career, I used the Phonovisual Consonant and Phonovisual Vowel wall charts to teach and firmly establish letter-sound association by means of daily drill. Our language is 85% phonetic and definitely worth learning the phonetic rules and exceptions. Students need to have the opportunity to apply their knowledge of basic phonics skills to reading texts that are phonetically based and experience success in the early stages of reading. I used the five levels of Primary Phonics, Educators Publishing Service, Inc. They are decodable and progressive. This series was an excellent supplement to our district adopted reading program and books in our classroom. Introduce new books and stories to your students in a manner that sparks interest and curiosity. Check comprehension by asking “who”, “what”, “when”, “why”, and “where” questions. (Note NEA article) I
  3. 3. Lots of reading practice strengthens fluency. Re-reading is important; it helps in the development of word recognition and fluency. I retired after 40 years of teaching, 35 years in my last district in southern California. I loved teaching 1st grade students. Please contact me if you have any questions or comments. My e-mail address is ddittus@cox.net Retired teacher, Darlene Dittus p.s. Check out the dominoes! The domino patterns are an excellent visual tool and extremely helpful in the process of learning and memorizing basic number combinations. Also, another good site for beginning readers is starfall. I would like to share this article published in NEA Today by Catherine Snow, Professor at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education Three basic elements that build good readers: 1. Children need to understand the alphabetic writing system — that words have letters and that letters relate to sounds. 2. They need opportunities to use reading to obtain meaning from print. 3. They need frequent chances to practice their skills to achieve fluency. Children should be encouraged to sound out unfamiliar words. They should use context and pictures as tools for monitoring word recognition. To promote comprehension, curriculums should include instruction in summarizing the main idea, predicting events, and drawing inferences. Children need time to write every day. Invented and traditional spelling can co-exist–with the former helping children understand the sounds created by different letter combinations. I received this cartoon from a friend in Denver, CO. (clipping from a local Denver newspaper). In conclusion, Reading = Education II
  4. 4. Using these Lessons I recommend teaching these lessons in the same order as listed in the index. On occasion, you may need to modify it and break it into mini-bites if the lessons become overwhelming for a hesitant, beginning reader. You need to keep the motivation and interest intact and adjust the pace. I suggest the following steps: Mini-reading lesson steps for the student 1. Master the sounds on the Consonant and Digraph Picture Charts 2. Understand the process of blending two consonant sounds as you pursue the Consonant Blend Chart. Ex: (bl). The sound of b slides into the sound of l. (Another way is to put the sound of b in one hand, the sound of “l” in the other hand, and bring your two hands together, blending the sound of bl). 3. Short Vowels (picture chart) Learn the sound of short “a”, and then go to Lesson #1 Short (a). Continue with the blending process. Ex: cat. The sound of c slides into the sound of short a, resulting in the sound of ca... cat. In pursuing the easy list of rhyming words, the left column is slightly easier than the right side. Work on reading a few of the easy columns. Once the student understands the process of decoding, you're bound to see an excited student who has just discovered the key to learning how to read and is ready to expand that process. 4. Go back to the Short Vowels picture chart and learn the remaining short vowel sounds and pursue the remaining lessons as you need to. I assume the student's level of maturity, temperament, and attitude may influence the pace of learning. Sight Words and Text Simple Sight Words are listed in the reference portion of the index. Sight words are not phonetic and appear with high frequency in basic reading texts. Learning the sight words tends to be an automatic process that depends largely on the number of times the reader is exposed to the words. The text in these lessons is green if it is a sight word. After the student has been exposed to a particular sight word for about twenty times, the words are no longer printed in green. In addition to the green sight words, the text may also be green if the word has not yet been introduced in the lesson sequence. III
  5. 5. About the site The lessons can be used online, but really they are designed to be printed out on standard letter-size paper from the menu bar. The only way I could control the font, format, page breaks and such was to create a separate file of pdf documents for the different lessons. On the screen the pdf's look strange but they print out OK. The site looks OK on Safari, Chrome, Firefox, Opera, and IE8. If you're using an older version of Internet Explorer, get another browser. This site is a work in progress and I welcome any corrections or suggestions to improve the content. IV
  6. 6. Free Phonics Lessons Interactive Picture Charts Consonants (breath sounds) Variant Vowels Digraphs (breath voice sounds) Vowel Chant Consonants (voice sounds) (2 pp) Consonant Blends (2 pp) Short Vowels Additional Blends Long Vowels Final Blends References DictationSpelling Practice Simple Sight Words Lessons #1 Short (a) #32 Vowel Pattern (old, ost) #2 Short (i) #33 Variant Vowel Pattern (or) #3 Short (u) #34 Review (o-e, oe, oa, -o, ow, old, ost) #4 Short (o) #35 Vowel Pattern (u-e, ue) #5 Short (e) #36 Vowel Pattern (ew, ui) #6 (ea) Combination #37 Review (u-e, ue, ui, ew) #7 Digraph (th) #38 Review Long Vowel Patterns #8 Digraph (wh) #39 Suffix (bye-bye e) #9 Digraph (sh) #40 Contractions #10 Digraph (ch) #41 Spelling Pattern (are) #11 Bossy r (ar) #42 Variant Vowel Bossy r (ur) #12 Vowel Pattern (a-e, ay) #43 Variant Vowel Bossy r (er) #13 Vowel Pattern (ai, eigh) #44 Variant Vowel Bossy r (ir) #14 Review (a-e, ai, ay, eigh) #45 Variant Vowel Bossy r (or) #15 Singular, Plural (ant, ants) #46 Variant Vowel Pattern (long oo) #16 Singular, Plural (branch, branches) #47 Variant Vowel Pattern (short oo) #17 Suffixes (ed, ing) #48 Variant Vowel Pattern (ow, ou) #18 Ending (le) as in apple #49 Variant Vowel Pattern (aw, au, al, all) #19 Vowel Pattern (ee, -e) #50 (wa) as in water #20 Vowel Pattern (ea) #51 Variant Vowel Pattern (oy, oi) #21 Vowel Pattern (-y) #52 Soft c (ce, ci, cy) #22 Vowel Pattern (ey, ie) #53 Soft g (ge, gi, gy) #23 Review (ee, ea, -e, -y, ey, ie) #54 Soft g (dge) V
  7. 7. #24 Vowel Pattern (i-e, ie) #55 (ch) as in chimney, chef... #25 Vowel Pattern (igh, -y) #56 Initial Blends #26 Vowel Pattern (ind, ild) #57 Final Blends #27 Review (i-e, ie, igh, -y, ind, ild) #58 Silent Letters (ph, gh) #28 Spelling Rule (plural) #59 Digraph (ng) #29 Vowel Pattern (o-e, oe) #60 Ending (tion, sion) #30 Vowel Pattern (oa, -o) #61 Silent Letters (wr, kn, mn, mb) #31 Vowel Pattern (ow) Spelling Dolch Words These lessons are designed to teach new learners to read by building a phonetic foundation. The beginning reader can use the consonant charts and the vowel charts to learn the basic sounds and spelling of letter combinations. The lessons are arranged in a format that can be easily used by parents and teachers as instructional materials for the purpose of developing basic reading and spelling skills. Phonics skills are key elements to the successful development of basic reading and spelling skills. Learning basic math facts using dominoes is included as well as timed addition and subtraction drills. The lessons are also available at theschoolhouse.us. VI
  8. 8. Learn these beginning consonant sounds. Say the picture word and listen to the sound you hear at the beginning. Repeat this sound until you've learned it well. You need to know these sounds in order to decode (sound out) words. Breath Sounds Click on the letter, name, and picture 1
  9. 9. Learn these digraph sounds. Say the picture word and listen to the sound you hear. Repeat this sound until you've learned it well. You need to know these sounds in order to decode (sound out) words. Breath Sounds Click on the letter, name, and picture Breath Sound Voice Sound 2
  10. 10. Learn these beginning consonant sounds. Say the picture word and listen to the sound you hear at the beginning. Repeat this sound until you've learned it well. You need to know these sounds in order to decode (sound out) words. Voice Sounds 3
  11. 11. Yy is a special letter; sometimes it is a consonant and sometimes it is a vowel. The y in the word yak is a consonant. (It is a voice consonant; its sound is audible.) The vowels are a-e-i-o-u and sometimes y. y functions as a vowel when it: a) concludes a word which has no other vowel (my) b) concludes words of more than one syllable (happy) c) immediately follows another vowel (may). In the combination ay, y serves as a vowel. When two vowels are together - the first has its long sound, the second is silent. Hence, our vowel rule: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking, (it says its name). The second one does the walking, (it is silent). 4
  12. 12. Pictures begin with the short vowel sound 5
  13. 13. Long vowel reading/spelling patterns Long vowels say their name (as in the alphabet) 6
  14. 14. Reading and Spelling Patterns 7
  15. 15. 8
  16. 16. Learn these beginning consonant sounds. Say the picture word and listen to the sound you hear at the beginning. Repeat this sound until you've learned it well. You need to know these sounds in order to decode (sound out) words. 9
  17. 17. 10
  18. 18. Say the name of the picture and listen to the two/three sounds you hear at the beginning of each picture. Repeat this sound until you've learned it well. Knowing these sounds will enable you to read words fluently since you can eliminate the process of sounding out the letters each time you come across them. Consonants and Digraphs (shr, thr) 11
  19. 19. 12
  20. 20. Directions Dictation is an excellent means of providing spelling practice and a great follow up activity after the student can phonetically decode and read the words listed in each lesson. Each lesson focuses on a specific spelling pattern. 1. Dictation requires a teaching assistant to help the student. This person selects a word listed in the lesson and dictates the word clearly, ex: (cat); then repeats the word, but this time says the word slowly while “sounding out” each letter. (Slide the sounds to some extent.) 2. Simultaneously, the student listens, discriminates, then writes the letters representing these specific sounds - (cat). Basically, the student writes the word to the best of his/her ability. 3. The teaching assistant checks the spelling immediately. If the student has spelled the word correctly, extend a word of praise. If there is an error, point out the word listed in the lesson, have him/her read it and “sound it out” then rewrite the word correctly. It may be necessary to let the student look at the word to enable him/her to write it correctly. If the process of dictation is too difficult for the student, go back and review all the consonant and vowel sounds presented at the beginning (picture charts). Concentrate especially on developing a solid understanding of the consonants and short vowel sounds before moving onto the long and variant vowel sounds. 13
  21. 21. Lots of drill may be necessary in order to learn letter names and sounds. Work on blending letter sounds of simple words, ex: (cat), to help the student understand the process of decoding. It may be helpful to read the easy rhyming words (left column) in lessons 1 - 5 before attempting those listed in the right hand column. Rereading strengthens and develops reading fluency. Readiness (maturity) is a factor that affects the pace or rate of learning 14
  22. 22. Frequently used sight words. Sight Words are numerous and one cannot “sound them out” according to their phonetic spelling pattern. From the standpoint of spoken language, all words are phonetic. However, the spelling (visual patterns) in sight words, are such that the common phonic generalizations cannot be applied in decoding. These words appear frequently and must be memorized. a from oh sure above give once the again gives one their any goes only there are gone or they away have other to been here over today before I own too both into pretty two buy knew push upon children know put very color laugh ready want come live really was could love said wash do many says were does mother school what don't Mr. shall where done Mrs. should who door none some work father of someone would four off something you friend often sometime your 15
  23. 23. Frequently used sight words - Part 2 across dove language soldier air dozen laughed son against dye leather soul aisle early library special already earn lion spread answer enough lived square anxious every machine steak around eye measure taught bear eyes million though beautiful field minute thought beauty folks mischief through because garage move together believe ghost neither ton calf gloves ocean tongue carry great office toward coming grew onion usual cough guard open vein couple guess ought view course guide patient warm cousin head piece weather cruel heart please whom curve heaven quiet whose dead heavy ranger wolf deaf hour rough woman debt idea science won desire Indian scissors write double instead sew wrong doubt isle sign young 16
  24. 24. Read these short (a) words in each of the columns. If you need to decode (sound out) these words, remember to “slide” the beginning (consonant, consonant blend, digraph) sound into the vowel sound, then “hook on” the ending (consonant, consonant blend, or digraph) sound at brat bad brad bag brag bat chat cad clad gag crag cat flat dad glad hag drag fat scat fad shad jag flag hat slat had lag snag mat spat lad nag stag pat that mad rag swag rat pad sag sat sad tag tat wag vat am clam an bran cap chap cam cram ban clan gap clap dam dram can flan lap flap ham gram Dan plan map scrap jam pram fan scan nap slap Pam scam man span rap snap ram scram pan Stan sap strap Sam sham ran than tap trap tam slam tan yap yam swam van zap tram 17
  25. 25. cab crab ax flax and bland gab grab lax band brand jab slab sax hand grand lab stab tax land stand tab wax sand strand bass brass cast blast back black lass class fast hack clack mass crass last Jack crack pass glass mast lack flack sass grass past pack quack vast rack shack sack slack Al tack smack gal snack Hal stack pal track Val whack camp champ ash brash bank blank damp cramp bash clash dank clank lamp scamp cash crash hank drank ramp stamp dash flash lank flank tamp tramp gash slash rank frank vamp hash smash sank plank lash splash tank prank mash stash yank shrank rash trash spank sash thrash stank swank thank 18
  26. 26. ask flask daft craft asp clasp bask haft draft gasp grasp cask raft graft hasp mask shaft rasp task bath bang clang can't chant lath gang slang pant grant math hang sprang rant plant path rang twang scant rath sang slant ranch blanch dance chance catch klatch branch lance France hatch scratch stanch glance latch snatch prance match thatch stance patch trance advance cancan grandstand ransack backhand capstan handcraft rattrap backlash catnap handstand sandbank backpack claptrap hangman sandblast backtrack crabgrass hatband sandman bandstand crankshaft hatrack scratchpad Batman fastback madcap snapback blackjack fatback madman taxman blackstrap flapjack ragtag transplant cabstand gangplank 19
  27. 27. Read these short (i) words in each of the columns. If you need to decode (sound out) these words, remember to “slide” the beginning sound into the vowel sound, then “hook on” the ending sound. dip blip bit chit dim brim hip clip fit flit him grim lip drip hit grit Kim prim nip flip it quit rim shim rip grip kit skit Tim skim sip quip lit slit slim tip ship nit spit swim zip skip pit split trim slip sit whim snip wit strip zit bib crib trip fib glib whip jib squib rib bid grid big brig din chin did quid dig prig fin grin hid skid fig sprig in shin kid slid gig swig kin skin lid squid jig trig pin spin mid pig twig sin thin rid rig Whig tin twin Sid wig win 20
  28. 28. his quiz hiss fix is whiz kiss mix miss six sis this Dick brick ding bring fink blink hick chick king cling ink brink kick click ping fling link chink lick crick ring sling mink clink nick flick sing spring pink drink pick quick wing sting rink shrink rick slick string sink slink sick stick swing wink stink tick thick thing think wick trick gilt quilt dint flint imp blimp hilt spilt hint glint limp chimp kilt stilt lint print wimp crimp lilt mint splint primp silt sprint shrimp tilt squint skimp wilt stint gift drift disk brisk fist grist lift grift risk frisk list twist rift shift whisk mist sift shrift swift dish squish bilk thrift fish swish milk wish silk 21
  29. 29. ditch glitch midge bridge finch clinch hitch snitch ridge fridge inch flinch Mitch stitch smidge pinch grinch pitch switch winch witch twitch pith smith with admit dismiss lavish rabbit ambit famish limit rabid avid finish limpid radish axis flagship lipid rapid backlit frigid lipstick rigid backspin gambit liquid sandpit bandit gaslit livid satin Baptist gravid matchstick shindig bigwig habit matin skinflint blacklist hamstring maxim slapstick cabin handspring misfit timid candid hatpin misprint transit catfish impish napkin valid catnip imprint nitpick vapid chitlin insist nitwit victim digit kidskin picnic visit diminish kingpin pigskin vivid dimwit kingship pinprick wingtip dipstick kinship pippin within 22
  30. 30. Read these short (u) words in each of the columns. If you need to decode (sound out) these words, remember to “slide” the beginning sound into the vowel sound, then “hook on” the ending sound. bug chug but glut bum chum dug drug cut shut gum drum hug plug gut smut hum glum jug shrug hut strut mum plum lug slug jut rum scum mug smug nut sum slum pug snug rut strum tug thug swum thrum bun shun cub chub bud crud dun spun hub club cud spud fun stun nub flub dud stud gun pub stub mud thud nun rub scrub pun sub shrub run tub sun bus plus cup cuff bluff Gus thus pup guff fluff pus up huff gruff us muff scuff puff stuff 23
  31. 31. bump chump gush blush buck chuck dump clump hush brush duck cluck hump grump lush crush luck pluck jump plump mush flush muck shuck lump slump rush plush suck stuck pump stump slush tuck struck rump thump thrush yuck truck sump trump bunk chunk dung flung much dunk clunk hung slung such funk drunk lung sprung gunk flunk rung strung dusk hunk plunk sung stung husk junk shrunk swung musk lunk skunk tusk punk slunk sunk spunk dumb crumb stunk numb plumb trunk thumb cull skull bunt blunt bust crust dull hunt brunt dust thrust hull punt grunt gust trust gull runt shunt just lull stunt lust mull must null rust 24
  32. 32. bunch brunch Dutch clutch budge drudge hunch crunch hutch crutch fudge grudge lunch scrunch judge sludge munch nudge smudge punch trudge album discus hubbub pickup animus disgust humbug pumpkin backup distrust humdrum rabbitbrush buckskin dumbstruck hummus ruckus bumpkin dumdum litmus sacrum bunkum dumpling magnum sanctum buskin flashgun manhunt shantung cactus fungus maximum status campus gamut midgut stinkbug catgut grampus minimum stratus chipmunk gunsmith mugwump sunlamp cult halibut nimbus sunup cusp handcuff numbskull tantrum dandruff handgun pablum unjust dictum hiccup 25
  33. 33. Read these short (o) words in each of the columns. If you need to decode (sound out) these words, remember to “slide” the beginning sound into the vowel sound, then “hook on” the ending sound. bob blob bot blot cop chop cob glob cot clot fop clop gob slob dot plot hop crop hob snob got Scot lop drop job stob hot shot mop flop lob throb jot slot pop plop mob lot spot sop prop nob not stot top shop rob pot trot slop sob rot stop strop dock block dog blog hock chock fog frog bog clog jock clock hog smog cog flog lock crock log jog grog mock flock slog pock frock cod clod rock shock hod plod sock smock nod scrod box tock stock pod shod cox rod trod fox loft sod lox soft Tod pox 26
  34. 34. boss cross bong prong bond blond loss dross dong strong fond frond moss floss gong thong pond toss gloss long throng song romp chomp clomp stomp abscond crampon hotbox sandbox ascot crisscross hotshot shamrock backstop flattop jackpot sitcom birdsong foxtrot lapdog slingshot bobbin goblin lockbox stockpot bobcat gridlock nimrod stopcock bonbon gumdrop nonstop sunblock Boston hobbit obstruct sunspot bottom hobgoblin pompom tomcod cannot hobnob pompon unlock concoct hockshop potshot upshot construct hodgepodge robin wonton crackpot 27
  35. 35. Read these short (e) words in each of the columns. If you need to decode (sound out) these words, remember to “slide” the beginning sound into the vowel sound, then “hook on” the ending sound. bet Bret bed bled den Glen get Chet fed bred fen then jet fret led fled hen when let whet Ned Fred men met red pled pen net Ted shed ten pet wed shred set sled pep prep wet sped rep step beg Greg hem stem bend blend keg them end spend leg fend trend peg bent Brent lend cent scent mend bell dwell dent spent rend dell quell Kent Trent send fell shell lent tend jell smell rent wend sell spell sent tell swell tent kept crept well vent wept slept yell went swept 28
  36. 36. best blest deck check belt smelt jest chest neck fleck felt spelt nest crest peck speck gelt pest quest melt rest pelt test left cleft welt vest deft theft west heft Bess bless zest less chess elf shelf mess dress pelf press self stress edge dredge mesh flesh help whelp hedge fledge fresh kelp ledge pledge sedge sledge bench clench length strength wedge wench drench French fetch fletch fence thence quench ketch sketch hence whence stench retch stretch pence trench vetch dead bread death breath head dread lead spread sweat stead threat thread health tread wealth 29
  37. 37. absent compel fragment patent address competent freshmen pellet advent confess hamlet quicken ascendent conquest happen reckless asset content helmet redneck banquet contest henchmen rotten basinet convent henpeck selfish basket dentist impel shipment basset dispel impress spectrum beckon distinct inject splendid bellhop docket inkwell subject Benjamin dragnet insect sudden billet eggshell intellect sunbelt bonnet enchantment intent sundeck bracket enrich kitchen suspect brisket entrap lapel suspend bucket evident ligament talent buffet exit liniment tenement cabinet expect magnet thicket casket expend neckband unclench castanet extend nutmeg unrented checklist filament nutshell uptrend chestnut flatten object velvet 30
  38. 38. Spelling Pattern (ea) short vowel sound Most often the spelling pattern (ea) has the long vowel sound as in teacher. However, there are quite a few words that have the short “e” sound (as in jet) but have the (ea) spelling pattern instead. Usually you will find these words listed among the sight words. Read these short vowel words. (short “e” as in jet). bedspread dread realm bread head spread breakfast health steadfast breast heaven stealth breath instead sweat dead lead thread deadlock leapt threat deadpan leaven tread deaf meant wealth death read weapon Dictation/Spelling Practice for (ea) combination ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 31
  39. 39. Read these sentences. How is your health? Do bread, head, and red rhyme? Which bread is best for your health? If you are rich, do you have wealth? Does your dog have bad breath? I put a Santa hat on my cat's head. Do you sweat when you are hot? I put my sweater on the bedstead. A bunch of dead ants were on my bedspread. Did you put the bedspread on the bed? What did you have for breakfast? I want the drumstick, Dad wants the breast. The deaf kid had a wealth of lead pencils. Please write a sentence that includes at least one (ea) word (short sound) in your sentence. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your sentence in the space below. 32
  40. 40. Skill: digraph th (breath voice sound) A digraph has two letters, but one completely new sound. Put your fingers in front of your mouth and say “thank”. Can you feel the air as it is expelled from your mouth? Can you guess why it is called a “breath” sound? Read these words. ............................................................................................................................ (th breath sound) thank thing thrust thick think thud thicket thrift thug thickness thrill thump thin throb thwack ............................................................................................................................ (th voice sound) (audible) than them this that then thus Can you think of two more words that have either the breath or voice (th) sound? ______________________________ ______________________________ Dictation/Spelling Practice for (th) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 33
  41. 41. Read the sentences listed below. I must thank Ben and Sam. This box has less stuff than that box. I think I will fill the bathtub. Beth’s dog had a bath. I think I can toss this big thing. This cloth is soft and thick. I think I will run on this path. Is the cat thin or fat? I think I will have some broth. The thrush sang in the thicket. Thad can thwack the big thug. The rabbit in the path can thump his foot. Beth is ill, and thus absent. Write one or two sentences and include one or more (th) words in each sentence. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ 34
  42. 42. Skill: digraph wh (breath sound) A digraph has two letters, but one completely new sound. Read these words beginning with (wh). whack which whip whelp whim whippet when whir whit whet whirl whiz Can you think of two more words that have this digraph? ______________________________ ______________________________ Dictation/Spelling Practice for (wh) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read the sentences listed below. I must get a whiff of fresh air. Sam can whirl the top and it will spin. Can I whack that rock with this stick? When will we have lunch? Which whip do you want? What shall I do when I finish this? A whippet can run fast. 35
  43. 43. Write two sentences. You must include at least one or more words that begin with the digraph (wh) in each sentence. Your writing should reflect good penmanship, proper spacing, and correct usage of upper and lowercase letters. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate one of the (wh) sentences. 36
  44. 44. Skill: digraph sh (breath sound) A digraph has two letters, but only one sound. Read these words. shed shell shin shelf shift ship brush fish splash dish fresh trash finish rush wish Dictation/Spelling Practice for (sh) words ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ Read these sentences I wish I did not have to wash the dishes. Why did Trish put this dish in the trash? I wish I had a shirt with a fish on it. Is dad selfish with his cash? Mom put the shell on the top shelf. Did the cat finish the dish of fish? I will run to the shed and get my dog's brush. I wish the ship would not splash so much water. 37
  45. 45. Write one or two sentences. Include one or more (sh) words in each sentence. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate one of your sentences. 38
  46. 46. Skill: digraph ch (breath sound) A digraph has two letters, but only one sound. Read these words. chaff chat chicken chip champ check chili chipmunk chant chess chill chock chap chest chin chop chaps chick chink chuck attach fetch latch scratch bench finch lunch sketch bunch French match stitch catch glitch much stretch cinch hitch patch such clench hunch pitch twitch clutch inch ranch which crutch itch rich witch Dictation/Spelling Practice for (ch) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 39
  47. 47. Read these sentences. Can you chitchat with a chick? Can you catch a black witch? Which witch has the black cat? The pitch-black witch fell in the ditch. Can he scratch the itch on his back? Chad has the chicken pox. I can catch if you will pitch. Can the ranch hand attach his chaps? Chuck's job is to fix the computer glitch. She is sketching a chipmunk on the bench. Chadwick has a bunch of cash and is rich. Please make a simple illustration of one the sentences above. If you wish to make a more elaborate illustration, use the back of your paper. 40
  48. 48. Skill: spelling/reading pattern (ar) This letter pattern is known as “bossy r” “Bossy r” is bossy but polite. It lets the vowel go first, (ar) but it doesn’t let it say its sound. Read the words listed below. arch bark chart hard spark ark barn dark march star arm car dart Mark start art card disarm park tar artist Carl far shark target bar carpet farm sharp tart barbell cart garden smart yard Can you think of some more words that have the “Bossy” (ar) sound? Write them. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Dictation/Spelling Practice for (ar) words ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ 41
  49. 49. Read these sentences. Mark is smart and does not jab the shark. My car is dark blue. Mom has a jar of jam. There are lots of stars in the dark sky. Does the shark have a scar? The farm has a big yard. How far did you march? I hit my arm on a hard rock. Clark is an artist. Mark’s dad is smart. Did Carl's dart hit the target? We have a garden on our farmyard. Is it hard to pick up a barbell? Is it smart to disarm a cop? Carl sat on the carpet and read the card. The dog in the barn barks and barks in the dark. Carl put the tart in the pushcart. The artist hung the star on the ark. Write two sentences. You must include at least one or more “bossy r” words in each sentence. Remember “bossy r” words in this lesson have the spelling pattern (ar). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ __________________________________4_2_________________________________
  50. 50. Please illustrate and label a word that has the bossy (ar) pattern. These words have the (ar) spelling pattern, but do not have the usual (ar) sound. afterward caterpillar hazard backward collar lizard beggar dollar upward blizzard forward wizard 43
  51. 51. Skill: long (a) spelling pattern: (a-e) and (-ay) Read the words listed below. The “e” at the end of the word cake is silent. It is a signal that sits at the end of a word. It tells the first vowel to say its name. This rule is known as the magic e rule. ape game place snake cake grade race take came late same trade chase made skate whale The vowels are a e i o u and sometimes y. In the combination ay, y serves as a vowel. When two vowels are adjacent, the first usually has its long sound while the second is silent. There's an easy rule for the combination of two vowels next to each other: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking, the second does the walking. The first vowel says its name, the second vowel is silent. day hay pay say stray clay lay play spray tray gray may pray stay way What are the two long (a) vowel patterns in the words listed above? ______________________________ ______________________________ 44
  52. 52. Can you think of some more words that use the (a-e) or (-ay) pattern? Write them. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Dictation/Spelling Practice for (a-e, -ay) words ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ Read these sentences. I came to the game late. Did you see the ape chase the snake? May the stray dog stay and play? Is Jake in the same grade as Kate? May I play on the bale of hay? Did Kate make a cake? I will trade this fake snake for a spade. Ray, Kate, and Jake like to sway. Kate put the clay on the gray tray. Dale will have an x-ray today. Is it okay to play in a skatepark? 45
  53. 53. Write two sentences. Use words that have the spelling patterns (a-e), (-ay) in each sentence ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate one of your sentences. 46
  54. 54. Skill: long (a) spelling pattern: (ai) and (eigh) Remember this long vowel rule: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking, the second does the walking. Ex: In the word train, “ai” are adjacent (walking side by side). The first vowel “a” is talking (says it’s name – as in the alphabet), the i is walking (is silent). Read the words listed below. aim mail raid tail brain paid rail trail chain pail rain train drain pain sail trait fail paint snail vain gain plain sprain wail jail quail stain wait (eigh) says a eight sleigh neighbor weight (Height and sleight are exceptions to the rule.) What are the two long (a) patterns used in the words listed above? Write them. ______________________________ ______________________________ Can you think of some other words that use the (ai) or (eigh) pattern? Write them. ______________________________ ______________________________ 47
  55. 55. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (ai, eigh) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. I mailed eighteen boxes. The snail made an eight-inch trail. I had to wait in the rain for the train. Jake ate eight plain pancakes in jail Did the maid paint the rail? I am afraid I gained too much weight. Does the word tail rhyme with jail? My neighbor’s horse says, “neigh.” It was raining when I sprained my hand on a rail. I see a snail in the rain under the sleigh. He failed to paint the plain wood chair. The train whistle sings and sings in my brain. I laid my dog's chain on my neighbor's steps. I saw eight quail on a trail at Torrey Pines. I had to wait until the waitress brought the main dish. The train has lots of freight cars. I got my neighbor’s mail today. The mail train sails along the rails. She waits in vain to see the sails. The rain in Spain falls on the plain. A trail of theft will land you in jail. 48
  56. 56. Create your own sentence, include one or more words that have the long a spelling pattern (ai) or (eigh). Your writing should reflect good penmanship, proper spacing, and correct usage of upper and lowercase letters. Do not mix upper and lowercase letters. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your sentence. 49
  57. 57. The letter a in the English language can have several distinct pronunciations. Lesson 11 dealt with the ar pattern as in arm. Long a as in bake is treated in the previous and current lesson, and Lesson 41 covers a as in care. The remaining a sounds are basically of the short a variety such as ask, bad, can (as in Lesson 1) or sofa, about. For the most part when a is the first or last letter of a word, it is pronounced as a short u. Such words in these lessons are treated as sight words. Sight words do not follow general phonetic rules and must be learned by repeated exposure to different examples in reading text. Student exposure and awareness is sufficient at this time. about alike apology attention above Amanda around awake alarm apiece assume away Amanda cola mozzarella pizza ballerina koala panda salsa banana magenta papaya tapioca cafeteria mama piñata tarantula Chihuahua Maria pita yoga I have listed a few of the common words that begin or end with “a”, sounding like short “u”. Have the student listen for the sound of short “u” at the beginning or end of the listed words as you read them to the student. 50
  58. 58. Review long (a) spelling/reading patterns: a-e, ai, ay, eigh Can you write eight words using the above long (a) patterns? Try to write two words using each of the patterns. 1.(a-e) _______________ 2._______________ 3.(ai) _______________ 4._______________ 5.(ay) _______________ 6._______________ 7.(eigh) _______________ 8._______________ Read these sentences consisting of words that include the four long (a) patterns, namely a-e, ai, ay, eigh. The maid came to my neighbor’s house on Sunday. The quail ate nuts and snails in my neighbor’s pathway. We played by the gate and found eight nails. I paid Santa today to take a ride in his sleigh. 51
  59. 59. Can you write a sentence that includes all the long (a) patterns (a-e, ai, ay, eigh)? Give it your best try. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Check your sentence. Did you begin your sentence with a capital letter? Did you end your sentence with a (.), (?), or (!)? Is your penmanship neat? Did you allow a little space between each word? Were you able to include all the long (a) patterns (a-e, ai, ay, eigh) in your sentence? 52
  60. 60. Skill: Spelling rule regarding singular (one) and plural nouns (more than one) A noun is a word that names a person, place or thing. When a word stands for two or more things, it usually has a plural ending, which most often is “s”. Read the words and sentences listed. ant ants bug bugs cab cabs cat cats dog dogs drum drums gift gifts kid kids ship ships van vans I see lots of ants on the anthill. My dog can run with his pals. Jack and his friends are having fun with the drums. I have a gift for the girls. I see ten crabs on the rocks. I see six bugs on the kitchen rugs. I lost two big red buttons. I have six cats and ten rabbits. I will set the nuts next to the napkins. 53
  61. 61. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (s) Plurals ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Make up two sentences and include one or more of the words listed in this lesson. Your writing should reflect good penmanship, proper spacing, and correct usage of upper and lower case letters. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Illustrate one of your sentences on the back of your paper. 54
  62. 62. Skill: Spelling rule - plural endings When the base word ends with ch, sh, s, ss, x, z, add (es) to make it plural. Plural means more than one Read this list of words box boxes branch branches brush brushes bus buses buzz buzzes dish dishes dress dresses fetch fetches fox foxes gas gases glass glasses kiss kisses lunch lunches march marches rush rushes sandwich sandwiches stitch stitches tax taxes wish wishes 55
  63. 63. Read these sentences. I had six stitches on my lip. Two foxes are on a rabbit hunt. I put my dresses in the box. That bee buzzes a lot. I got six candy kisses. How many kisses did you get? How many boxes do you want? The buses are here! My mom pushes me when I swing. I have two witches on my lunch bag. Put the brushes in the sink. My dog fetches the things I toss. My dog rushes to the bus. I lost my glasses! I have two addresses. I will add the taxes to the bill. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (es) Plurals Review rule: When a base words ends with (ch, sh, s, ss, x, z), add “es” to make it plural (more than one). ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 56
  64. 64. Write one or two original sentences. Use some of the singular and plural words listed in this lesson. Your writing should reflect good penmanship, proper spacing, and correct usage of upper and lowercase letters. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your sentence in the space below. 57
  65. 65. Suffixes: word endings (ed, ing) Prefixes and suffixes are structural changes added to root words. Common endings that begin with a vowel (-er, -est, -ing, -ed, able) are usually sounded as syllables. A syllable is a vowel or a group of letters containing a vowel sound which together form a pronounceable unit. All words include at least one vowel. Spelling Rule: (Applies to words that have one syllable). When a short vowel is followed by one consonant at the end of the root word, double the last consonant and add (ed) or (ing). To state this rule simply; “short vowel, one consonant, double” (It needs a friend) Example: The letter “u” is a short vowel in the word run. It is followed by one consonant (n), therefore the last letter (n) is doubled - running. If the short vowel is followed by two consonants (mp), as in the word jump, the last consonant is not doubled - jumping. Read these words (verbs) “Verbs are action words or words that show movement beg begged begging box boxed* boxing* clip clipped clipping dim dimmed dimming drag dragged dragging drop dropped dropping fax faxed* faxing* fix fixed* fixing* flap flapped flapping grab grabbed grabbing grin grinned grinning 58
  66. 66. grip gripped gripping hop hopped hopping hug hugged hugging jog jogged jogging mix mixed* mixing* pat patted patting plan planned planning plug plugged plugging shop shopped shopping stop stopped stopping tag tagged tagging run running sit sitting *Words (verbs) ending with the letter “x” are not doubled because the letter “x” is a blend of two consonants “ks” If the short vowel is followed by two or more consonants (mp), as in the word jump, the last consonant is not doubled - jumping. back backed backing bang banged banging end ended ending hand handed handing help helped helping itch itched itching jump jumped jumping kick kicked kicking kill killed killing rest rested resting sing singing wish wished wishing 59
  67. 67. Dictation/Spelling Practice for Suffixes Do you recall the spelling rule regarding the root word + ending? “short vowel, one consonant, double” (the last consonant) “short vowel, two or more consonants, do not double (the last consonant) ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. His dog begged for my snack. Did the glass crack when you dropped it? The rabbit hopped into the bushes. I hugged my mom and dad when they left the park. I like to go shopping with my mom. We stopped and petted the dogs. I was running very fast when I got tagged. I helped my dad do a trick. We kicked a tin can and then rested on the grass. The man milked a big black yak. My back itched so much I had to scratch it. I asked my mom to come and help me. 60
  68. 68. Create a sentence that includes at least one base word + (ed), (ing). Your writing should reflect good penmanship, proper spacing, and correct usage of upper and lowercase letters. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ This portion of the lesson is meant for exposure. The student should revisit this page after he/she has completed lesson (#22, long “e”). Mastery in regard to reading should easily be achieved after the student has completed all the lessons. The suffixes (–ly) added to a base/root word changes its meaning. Sometimes it changes the way the word is used. Words ending in “–ly” normally tell how or how often something is done. Words ending with the suffix –ly (sounds like long e) amply dimly gladly openly shortly badly distinctly grimly partly simply barely doubtfully hardly plainly slowly bluntly entirely hotly possibly softly briefly exactly justly practically swiftly calmly faintly kindly probably tenderly clearly firmly lately promptly terribly closely flatly loudly purely thinly costly finally lowly quickly totally critically fondly mainly quietly truly deadly frankly mostly rarely unlikely dearly freely nearly really usually deeply gently oddly sadly warmly 61
  69. 69. Skill: (le) at the end of a word At the end of a word, le sounds like (l); the e does not affect the vowel sound. It is not “magic e” apple gobble middle scribble bubble handle nibble sniffle dribble jungle pickle tickle freckle little puddle uncle Can you think of some other words that end with “le”? Please write them. ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences The apple fell in the middle of the puddle. Be gentle when you handle the little bottle. Do tinkle, sprinkle, and twinkle rhyme? Will you wiggle and giggle if I tickle you? I have a little dimple in the middle of my chin. I see a little beetle scuttle up my uncle's neck. I jiggle and wiggle when I scribble. The big truck has two axles. I like to cuddle my stuffed rabbit. Ron’s uncle has lots of freckles. His uncle handles jungle frogs. My little cat nibbles pickles. 62
  70. 70. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (le) words ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ Make up a sentence that includes one or two words ending with (le). Check your sentence. Does it begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!) ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Illustrate your favorite sentence. 63
  71. 71. Skill: long (e) spelling patterns (ee) and (-e) Long vowel rule: When two vowels go walking the first one does the talking, (it says its name) the second vowel does the walking, (it is silent). Read the words listed below. bee feel peel sheep beef feet peep sheet beep fleet peewee sleep beet free queen steel beetle glee reed street bleed green reef sweep cheek heed reel sweet creek heel see teen creep jeep seed teeth deed keep seek thee deep meet seem three feed need seen week fee peek seep wheel When a one syllable short word ends with a vowel, it has a long vowel sound. (me) be he me she we Write the two long spelling patterns used in the words above. ______________________________ ______________________________ 64
  72. 72. Can you think of some more words that use the (ee) or (-e) spelling patterns. Write them. ______________________________ ______________________________ Dictation/Spelling Practice for (ee, -e) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. He fell into a deep sleep. Will the queen feed her three sheep? The queen seeks sweet beeswax. I will meet you next to the tree. She lost three teeth in the creek. Maybe we will see you at the reef. We may need to sweep the street. I feel sick and want to go to sleep. I like to keep my feet under the sheet. The heels of my feet itch a lot. The bee is chasing me up the tree. The jeep crossed the creek on steel wheels. The queen peeled back her green sheets to go to sleep. 65
  73. 73. Write two sentences. You must include words that have the long (e) spelling pattern,(ee) or (-e). Your writing should reflect good penmanship, proper spacing, and correct usage of upper and lowercase letters. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your favorite sentence. 66
  74. 74. Skill: Long (e) spelling pattern (ea) Long vowel rule: When two vowels go walking the first (vowel) does the talking,the second (vowel) does the walking. In the word teach –– “e” (says its name), “a” (is silent). Read these words. beach feast meat sea beagle flea neat seal cheat heal peach seat clean jeans peanut speak cream leaf reach teach dream lean read teapot each least reap treat eat mean scream weak What is the long (e) spelling pattern in the words listed above? _________________ Can you think of any more words that have this (ea) spelling pattern? List them. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 67
  75. 75. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (ea) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. My neighbor teaches at the beach. I like to be clean and neat. Peanuts are a good treat. The seal screeched a mean scream. I feel weak and must sneak a peach. Will the beetle eat the leaf? My teacher is on sick leave. I will eat meat at the feast. I can see a seal swimming in the sea. Can you heal the eagle and set him free? The cat had to flee from the mean flea. Jean cleaned and bleached her jeans. The least bit of cream on the seat must be cleaned. The teacher reached each student by speaking to them. When will the teacher wear the beads I gave her? Does a beaver eat a heap of beans. Our speaker at the assembly was Least Heat Moon. I have read all the stories the teacher is reading to us. 68
  76. 76. Create two sentences. Please include words that have the long (e) spelling pattern (ea). Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). Be attentive to penmanship. Do not mix upper and lowercase letters. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Make a simple illustration of your favorite sentence. 69
  77. 77. Skill: -y (long e spelling pattern) The vowels are: a-e-i-o-u- and sometimes y. When y functions as a vowel it: a) concludes a word which has no other vowel (my) b) concludes words of more than one syllable (happy) c) immediately follows another vowel (may, monkey). Read the words listed below. Note spelling pattern (-y) at the end of each word. When (-y) appears at the end of a word that has at least two syllables, it usually has the long (e) sound. Read the words listed below. baby envy jolly puppy belly filly Kelly rusty bunny foggy lady silly candy funny lilly skinny Carly golly lucky study creepy happy mommy tally daddy hungry party ugly easy jelly penny windy Can you think of some additional two syllable words that end with the letter “-y” that have the long “e” sound. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 70
  78. 78. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (-y) words with a long (e) sound ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. The lady washed the sticky baby. My dog, Lucky, is funny and lazy. My silly puppy wants a meaty treat. My baggy jeans are really messy. Mommy and daddy went to a party. My crazy kitty eats smelly tuna. Did you get a lucky penny at the party? Is that puny, skinny cat hungry? The fussy baby wants my sticky candy. I have a rusty, dusty, musty penny. I have a silly bunny named Polly. A filly, Happy-Go-Lucky, will race in the Kentucky Derby. Sally can count to 15 using tally marks. Sally and I met a jolly crowd at the rally. Don’t sully my friend’s name by calling him an ugly bully. Kelly has a pretty lilly in her hand. Bobby and his puppy went to the party at the pet shop. The jockey and the filly had to run on a muddy track. My study of creepy, crawly insects was fun and easy. The lady was lucky to get to the party on such a foggy day. 71
  79. 79. Create some sentences of your own. Write two sentences; please include words that have the (-y) long (e) spelling pattern. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). Do not mix upper and lowercase letters. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate one of your sentences. 72
  80. 80. Skill: long (e) spelling patterns (-ey) (ie) The vowels are: a-e-i-o-u- and sometimes y. When y functions as a vowel it: a) concludes a word which has no other vowel (my) b) concludes words of more than one syllable (happy) c) immediately follows another vowel (turkey) Vowel rule: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking. In the word monkey—“e” says its name, as in the alphabet. The second one does the walking; the “y” is silent. Read these words. alley galley key monkey chimney hockey kidney parsley chutney honey Mickey valley donkey jockey money volley The pattern (ie) is an irregular long (e) spelling pattern. It is often used in names, ex. Katie. This pattern does not follow the long vowel rule, (When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking.) We sometimes refer to these (ie) pattern words as “jail” words because they don’t follow the rule! It may be best to remember the old spelling rule: i before e, except after c. Read these words. Angie believe chief frieze piece baggie Bonnie cookie genie shield beanie brie field grief siege belief brief fiend niece thief 73
  81. 81. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (-ey, ie) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Please read these sentences. Remember the spelling patterns (-ey) and (ie) have a long (e) sound. Did the thief take the key? Do you want a piece of bread and honey? Did you see the jockey on the donkey? The chief sees the thief in the valley. I need some money to go on the trolley. The monkey ran across the hockey field. Did Natalie eat lunch with Katie? The alley cat left prints on my windshield. Charlie and Leslie are playing volleyball. I have a black alley cat named Sadie. I believe the siege of the valley will end soon. I bought a cookie and a piece of brie in the galley. Eating parsley on chutney gave my stomach grief. Mickey took off his beanie and put it in the baggie. The fiend siezed the fiefdom from the king. The thief got three years in the pokey for stealing money. A piece of the frieze fell off and hit my niece. 74
  82. 82. Write a sentence. Please use one or more words that have the (-ey) (ie) spelling patterns. Do not mix upper and lowercase letters. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), (?), or (!). Please be attentive to good penmanship. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your sentence or one of the sentences in this lesson. 75
  83. 83. Review long (e) spelling/reading patterns: ee, ea, -e, -y, -ey, ie Can you write twelve words using the above long (e) patterns? Write two words using each of these patterns. 1.(ee) ___________________ 2.___________________ 3.(ea) ___________________ 4.___________________ 5.(-e) ___________________ 6.___________________ 7.(-y) ___________________ 8.___________________ 9.(-ey) ___________________ 10.__________________ 11.(ie) ___________________ 12.__________________ Read these three sentences consisting of words that include the six long (e) patterns. He saw three silly thieves stealing money. She saw her sweet baby eat a piece of parsley. We saw a chief chase a busy honey bee to the beach. 76
  84. 84. Can you write a sentence that includes all the long e patterns (ea, ee, -e, ie,-y)? Give it your best try. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your sentence. 77
  85. 85. Skill: long (i) spelling patterns (i-e) and (ie) The “e” at the end of hike is silent; it is a signal that sits at the end of a word. It tells the first vowel to say its name. It is known as the magic e rule. Read these words. bike glide line rife thrive bite gripe mile ripe time bribe hide mine size tribe crime hive pike slime vine dike jibe pile smile while dive jive pipe spike whine drive kite pride spine white file life prize strife wide fine like quite strike wife five lime ride stripe wipe Recall long vowel rule: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking (it says its name), the second one does the walking (it is a silent listener). die died lie pie tie tied Write the two long (i) patterns used in the words above. ______________________________ ______________________________ 78
  86. 86. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (i-e, ie) words. ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ Read these sentences. I can hike five miles uphill to the pine trees. Did you tie the kite to your bike? Do you want a bite of this fine pie? I got the prize consisting of nine dimes. The deer did not die in the forest fire. I have five white tires stacked in a pile. Can you hide a pile of limes in a hive? I can bide my time until the fish bite. My cats like to lie in the sunshine. Mike can not ride his bike for a while. The bribe cost him a fine for his crime. My wife drives nine miles to dine on tripe. Mom said, “Rise and shine, waste no time.” She was quite white from fright when she saw the crime. Can you dive in the Nile at its widest part? They dined on ripe limes and white wine from the vine. If you strike the swine, they might bite. Mike could not wipe the grime off his striped tie. We could hear the chimes from the shrine's spire. 79
  87. 87. Create your own sentences. You must include words that have the long (i) spelling patterns (i-e) (ie). Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). Please be attentive to good penmanship. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Illustrate your favorite sentences. 80
  88. 88. Skill: long (i) spelling patterns (igh), (-y) Both of these patterns have the sound of long (i). The vowel (i) followed by (gh), usually has a long (i) sound. Read these words. blight fight insight right bright flight light sigh candlelight flighty lightning sight copyright frighten midnight slight daylight high might thigh delight highjack night tight enlighten highness plight tonight As you recall (-y) at the end of 2 syllable words, has a long (e) sound as in (any); (-y) at the end of 1 syllable words, has a long (i) sound as in (try). by fly my sly cry fry shy try dry guy sky why Write the two long (i) vowel spelling patterns used in this lesson. ______________________________ ______________________________ Can you think of any more words that have the long (i) spelling pattern (igh) (-y). Write them. ______________________________ 8 1______________________________
  89. 89. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (igh, -y) words with the long (i) sound ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. The flight was a bit frightening. It is not right to fight, I saw a bright light in the sky last night. Why did you cry last night? Why did the sly spy try to hide? Why is this lid so tight? Did the fish fly into the frying pan? Will my kite fly high at night? Why is Skylar so shy? He stopped by my shop to buy gum. I might see the fight tonight. I keep a flashlight inside my car. The guy was delighted to win the fight. My mouth went dry at sight of the bullfight. He read the copyright in the candlelight. The headlights on the road frightened the deer. He fell off the tightrope and broke his thighbone. The tightwad will count his money tonight. 82
  90. 90. Write one or two sentences, include words that have the (igh) or (-y) spelling pattern. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). Do not mix upper and lowercase letters. Please be attentive to good penmanship. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Illustrate your favorite sentence. 83
  91. 91. Skill:long (i) patterns (-ind) and (-ild) These patterns (-ind) (-ild) are irregular long vowel patterns. Usually words with just one vowel have a short vowel sound. However, these two spelling patterns are exceptions. Both (-ind, -ild) have a long (i) vowel sound. Read these words. behind hind mastermind spellbind bind hindsight mind unbind blind humankind mindset unkind find kind remind wind grind mankind rind windup child semiwild wildcat grandchild stepchild wildfire mild wild wildlife Dictation/Spelling Practice for (-ind) and (-ild) words. ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ 84
  92. 92. Read these sentences The child will hide behind the tree. Keep in mind to be kind to the blind. Do you mind if I get mild salsa? I must find the wild winding path. Did the blind child grind the nuts? What did you find behind the door? Find the book with the bad binding. A wild blind cat scraped her hind leg. Do you mind if I grind the coffee? My child likes lemon rind in his tea. Be kind when you play Blind Man’s Bluff. Can the blind man set the time and wind the clock? How can I find the red sock when I'm colorblind? Who was the mastermind behind this plot? The schoolchild had to rebind his book. Let me remind you to rewind the clock. The teacher was so spellbinding I won't forget her words. We can relax and unwind after we are finished. Will the wild animals survive the unkind oil spill? Write a sentence. Please include one or more words that have the (ind) (ild) spelling patterns. You may want to add a suffix to the base word. Ex: I am the kindest child. Please be mindful of correct punctuation and penmanship skills. Please illustrate your sentence on the back of your paper. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ 85
  93. 93. Review long (i) spelling/reading patterns: i-e, ie, igh, –y, ind, ild Write two words using each of the long (i) patterns. 1. (i-e) __________________ 2. ____________________ 3. (ie) ___________________ 4. ____________________ 5. (igh) __________________ 6. ____________________ 7. (-y) ___________________ 8._____________________ 9. (ind)__________________ 10.____________________ 11. (ild) __________________ 12.____________________ Read these sentences consisting of words that include the six long (i) patterns Mike can not find the frightened wild fly that sat on his pie. I like to bake a pie, fly a kite, and find wild mushrooms in the moonlight. My kind child hides ties and sighs. 86
  94. 94. Can you write a sentence that includes all the long i patterns (i-e, ie, igh, -y, ind, ild)? Give it your best try. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your sentence. 87
  95. 95. Skill: Spelling rule regarding plural endings When you change the form of a word to make it plural (more than one) follow this rule: Words ending with a consonant + y, change y to i and add es. Ex: Look at the word “puppy”, it ends with consonant “p” + y, apply the spelling rule (change y to i and add es) = puppies Read the words listed below. army armies baby babies body bodies bunny bunnies candy candies daddy daddies family families fly flies kitty kitties lady ladies lilly lillies mommy mommies party parties puppy puppies sky skies spy spies supply supplies 88
  96. 96. Plural endings: If the word ends in a vowel + y, add s to the word. Example: key keys bay bays day days key keys kidney kidneys tray trays way ways Dictation/Spelling Practice for Plurals (-y). Review the spelling rule regarding “y”. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. The ladies gave us jerseys for our game. We have two puppies and three cats. Did the babies play with the keys? Did you see the bunnies in the valley? The puppies chased the kittens. I lost my keys in the card shop. I gave a tray of kidneys to my cat. Do alley cats live in alleys? I wish there were no armies. The lady prays at dinner time. Wesley studies every night. Make a simple illustration of one of these sentences. If you have time for more elaborate art, use the back of this paper. 89
  97. 97. Skill: long (o) spelling patterns (o-e) and (oe) The “e” at the end of home is silent; it is a signal that sits at the end of the word. It tells the first vowel to say its name. It is known as the magic e rule. Read these words. bone hole robe stone choke home rode stove close hope rope those cone nose rose tone globe note slope vote grove pole smoke zone Recall the long vowel rule: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking (it says its name), the second one does the walking (it is silent). doe Joe roe toe foe hoe tiptoe woe Write the two long (o) spelling patterns in the words above. ______________________________ ______________________________ Can you think of some additional words with the spelling patterns (o-e, oe)? ______________________________ ______________________________ 90
  98. 98. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (o-e, oe) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. Did you hoe those roses? Did Moe poke a hole in the note? I do not like to be at home alone. Will the doe go home if we leave it alone? I rode my bike and fell in a hole. I fell and poked my nose on a stone. My dad drove home from his work. Mom tiptoed to the stove to check the smoked ham. The stovepipe helped the smoke go up the chimney. I have an aloe plant at my home. Can you play those notes on an oboe? Joe broke a bone in his big toe. I will taste the roe and drink pekoe tea. I played tic-tac-toe with Joe. Woe is me. The smoke chokes me. I stepped in a hole and broke a bone. He tied his robe with a rose rope. I hope my home will not slide down the slope. Oh woe! Poor Moe hacked his toe with a hoe. 91
  99. 99. Create two or more sentences. Include some words that have the spelling pattern (o-e, oe). Illustrate one of your sentences on the back of the paper. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Check your sentences. Did you begin each sentence with a capital letter? Did you add a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!) at the end of each sentence? Is your penmanship neat? A number of frequently used words do not follow the general vowel rules, particularly o–e (o consonant e words). I’m listing a few of these. These words are known as Sight Words. come done dove glove gone love none some One cannot “sound out” sight words according to their visual pattern. The word “come” appears to be a “magic e” word, therefore the “o” would have a long vowel sound. If pronounced according to the rule, it would sound like “comb” The common phonic generalizations (rules) learned in beginning reading cannot be applied to the pronunciation of sight words. 92
  100. 100. Skill: long (o) spelling pattern (oa) and (-o) Review long vowel rule: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking (it says its name), the second one does the walking (it is silent). Read the words listed below. boat float loam roast cloak foam loan soak coach goal oak soap coal goat oat throat coast load oath toad coat loaf road toast If a one syllable word ends with a vowel, the vowel is usually long. Ex: no go no so Cover the three words listed above. Can you spell them? Write them on the lines below. ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ 93
  101. 101. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (oa) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. Is Joe taking a nap in his boat? Did you go home after lunch? Did the goat eat the soap? I had a sore throat so I stayed home. Did you see the toad on the road? Will this boat float to the kelp beds? No, I did not reach the goal. I will slice this loaf and make toast. I left my coat on the boat. Can you hear the toad croak? The coach likes oatmeal and toast. An armload of charcoal fell on my toe. The coach gave us pot roast on toast. I hope to see an oak tree when I go up the coast. Did the oil soaked dolphins float to the coast? The freeloading cockroach ate all of the oatmeal. They were unloading the load of coal on the railroad. The toad on the road puffed its throat at the goat. The pot roast on toast made my stomach bloat. 94
  102. 102. Create two or more sentences. Please include words with the spelling pattern (oa, -o). Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). Do not mix upper and lower case letters. Please be attentive to good penmanship. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your favorite sentence. 95
  103. 103. Spelling Pattern (ow) The combination (ow) has two sounds. This lesson concentrates on (ow) as in row. (The variant vowel pattern (ow) as in cow will be introduced in lesson #48.) Read these long (o) words. bellow bowler glow owe slow billow bungalow grow own snow blow crow low pillow sow borrow elbow meadow row throw bow fellow mellow shadow tow bowl flow mow show yellow Can you think of any more long (o) words that have the (ow) spelling pattern? Please write them or you may choose to add a suffix (ending) ing, ed to a base word that shows action, as in “growing.” ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 96
  104. 104. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (ow) long (o)words. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. Do you bend your elbow when you throw things? You owe me a dime if you want to see the show. Why did you throw the pillow? I will put the snow in a bowl. How low can a crow fly? Can you follow the shadow of the crow? I see a yellow bow on the snowman. I sat in the shadow of a willow tree. The tow truck towed my car home. Can a blowfish blow bubbles? It is freezing in the blowing snow. Do you see the glow in the window? The stowaway on the ship was a mellow fellow. I laid my pillow in the shadow of the yellow bungalow. I will sow these seeds in a row and hope they grow. That bowler was a show-off until he hurt his elbow. A crow walked slowly in the shadow of my snowman. 97
  105. 105. Create two or more sentences; include words that have the long (o) spelling pattern (ow) as in “row”. Be attentive to neat penmanship and proper spacing. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), (?), or (!). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate one of your sentences. 98
  106. 106. Skill: long (o) spelling patterns (-old) and (-ost) Read the words listed below. (old): This pattern has a single vowel, though a long (o) sound. bold fold mold scold billfold gold old told cold hold sold (ost): The letter combination (ost) may have either a long (o) or short (o) sound. long o (ost) words ghost* most poster host post postman hostess postcard postmark *The “h” is silent in the word ghost. (ost): short o (ost) words cost frost lost nostril What are the two spelling patterns in the words listed above? ______________________________ ______________________________ 99
  107. 107. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (-old, -ost) long (o) words ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences I will fold this gold poster. I see mold on this old apple. The bold hostess scolded the child. I told the host I was cold. I will tie the old goat to the post. Please hold my cold hand. I sold the frame on my old gold poster. Most of the ghosts are invisible. Most of the cheese has mold on it. Dad sold the old gold candle. Did the postman fold the postcard? I sold the gold for more than it cost. I lost most of my toast when the hostess dropped the plate. 100
  108. 108. Create one or two sentences. Please include words that have the long (o) spelling pattern (-old, -ost) in each sentence. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter, end with a period (.), question mark (?) or exclamation point (!). Your penmanship should be neat and you should leave a little space between the words you write. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your favorite sentence. 101
  109. 109. Skill: Spelling Pattern (or) A vowel or (vowels) followed by the letter “r” results in a blended sound which is neither the short nor long sound of the vowel. Read these (or) words listed below. absorb corncob escort normal abnormal corpse extort north accord corset firestorm or bighorn deform for order born discord fork scorch conform distort form short contort dorm formal stork cord dormant horn storm cork dorsal horse thorn corn endorse mortal torch What spelling pattern do you see in each of the words listed above?_____________ Dictation/Spelling Practice for (or) words as in stork ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 102
  110. 110. Read these sentences. The leghorn wants corn, not a corncob. You did not order a morsel of food! The resort is north of the border. The normal mortal conforms to the rules. I saw storm clouds forming in the sky. The storks flew north to escape the storm. The horn and organ played a forlorn song. I experienced some discord with my landlord. Can you order a cord of wood for the stove? My pig snorts in the morning when he wants an acorn. The bighorn sheep went around the thorns. The hornets orbited their scorched nest. The orphans were escorted into the dorm. The foghorn and the torches in the storm saved the ship. She made an ornate cork border for the artist's frame. The porcupine made a nest for her newborn. His retort about my short shorts was in bad form. Create one or more sentences, include at least one word in each sentence that has the spelling pattern (or) as in stork. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate one of your sentences on the back of the paper. 103
  111. 111. Review long (o) spelling/reading patterns: o-e, oe, oa, ow, –o, old, ost Write two words using each of the long (o) patterns. 1. (o-e)__________________ 2. ____________________ 3. (oe)___________________ 4. ____________________ 5. (oa)___________________ 6. ____________________ 7. (ow) __________________ 8. ____________________ 9. (-o)___________________ 10. ___________________ 11. (old) _________________ 12. ___________________ 13. (ost)__________________13. ___________________ 104
  112. 112. Read the three sample sentence using all the long (o) patterns. The old ghost broke his toe and floats so slow. Joe told the host there was no soap in the stone bowl. The doe was so lame and old she almost stepped on a toad on her way home below the hill. Can you write a sentence that includes all the long (o) patterns (o-e, oe, oa, ow, –o, old, ost)? Give it your best try. If you can’t include all the long (o) patterns in a single sentence, write two related (same topic) sentences. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your sentence. 105
  113. 113. Skill: long (u) spelling patterns (u-e,ue) Recall the magic e rule. The e” at the end of the word mule is a signal that means the previous vowel (usually the first vowel) is long. The (u) in the word mule, has a long sound because it ends with the magic “e” signal. Long (u) has two sounds; long (u) as in mule and (oo) as rude Read the words listed below. brute cute mute rule chute duke perfume tube cube flute prune tune cure mule rude use Recall the long vowel rule: When two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking (it says its name). The second one does the walking (it’s silent). argue cue rescue tissue blue due statue true clue glue Sue Tuesday What are the two long (u) spelling patterns in the words listed above? ______________________________ ______________________________ 106
  114. 114. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (u-e, ue) words. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. Is your blue book due on Tuesday? Give me a clue regarding the rules. Will Sue hide inside a hollow tube? Follow the rules and do not be rude. We rescued the mule on the cliff. Do not argue about the rules. May Duke use your glue stick? Do you like to use perfume? Please nuke the barbecue and serve it hot. Duke is upset. Will a happy tune cure him? Luke plays a cute tune on a steel tube. Do you pursue your work with a good attitude? If you are mute, are you speechless? Can June mute her flute? June is cute and follows the rules. It is rude to pass crude notes. The mule was a big brute but needed to be rescued. 107
  115. 115. Create two or more sentences. Please include words that have the long (u) spelling patterns (u-e, ue). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Make a simple illustration your favorite sentence. Feel free to use the back of your paper. 108
  116. 116. Skill: long (u) spelling pattern: (ew) and (ui) Remember: Long (u) has two sounds (u) and (oo) Long (u) has four spelling patterns: u-e, ue, ew, ui. Long (u) has two sounds, u as in mule and long double sound oo as in moon. Read the words listed below. blew dew grew screw brew drew knew stew chew few new threw crew flew pew view The vowel pattern (ui) is used infrequently as long (u), in this case it is mostly limited to the oo sound as in fruit. bruise fluid juice suit cruise fruit ruin suitcase What are the two long (u) spelling patterns in the words listed above? ______________________________ ______________________________ 109
  117. 117. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (-ew, ui) words. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. The crew made stew. The stew is hard to chew. The skunk sat on the new pew in church. Duke said Phew, I smell a skunk! Just a few of our seeds grew. Dad laid his new suit in the suitcase. The wind blew our cruise ship. I threw some fruit to the sea gull. I have a good view of the cruiser. I drew a picture of a few crewmen. The fruit is covered with dewdrops. I need a suitable suit for the cruise. Lewis wants a few pieces of fruit. I grew two inches on the cruise. I will brew a few cups of coffee and bring some fresh fruit for the crew. I want a few pieces of fruit and some stew in my new bowl. 110
  118. 118. Create two original sentences. Please be attentive to good handwriting. Include words that have the long (u) spelling patterns (ew, ui) in each sentence. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please check your sentences. Do they begin with a capital letter? Do they end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). Is your handwriting legible and neat? Did you leave a little space between each word? Please illustrate one of your sentences in the space below or on the back of the paper. 111
  119. 119. Review long (u) spelling/reading patterns: u-e, ue, ui, ew Can you write eight words using the above long (u) patterns? Try to write two words using each of the patterns. 1.(u-e) _________________ 2._________________ 3.(ue) _________________ 4._________________ 5.(ui) _________________ 6._________________ 7.(ew) _________________ 8._________________ Read these two sentences, each consisting of words that include the four long (u) patterns. The cute fruit fly flew into the glue. The new blue mule likes to drink juice. The cruel guard ate a few prunes and a grapefruit. Can you create a sentence that includes all the long (u) spelling patterns (u-e, ue, ui,ew)? Give it your best try. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ 112
  120. 120. Check your sentence. Did you begin your sentence with a capital letter? Did you end your sentence with a (.), (?), or (!)? Is your penmanship neat? Did you allow a little space between each word? Were you able to include all the long (u) patterns (u-e, ue, ui, ew) in your sentence? Please illustrate your sentence. 113
  121. 121. Review Long Vowel Patterns Read each sentence and note the long vowel patterns. Create a sentence for long a, e, i, o, and u. Try to use all the vowel patterns as in the sample sentences. Long (a) spelling patterns: a-e, ai, ay, eigh We played by the gate and found eight nails. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Long (e) spelling patterns: ee, ea, -e, -y, -ey, ie We saw three silly thieves stealing money. She saw a monkey named Katie in a leafy tree. The chief likes turkey and gravy, but he likes green beans best. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ 114
  122. 122. Long (i) spelling patterns: i-e, ie, igh, -y, ind, ild Mike was kind of frightened by the wild fly on his pie. My kind child hides ties and sighs. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Long (o) spelling patterns: o-e, oe, oa, ow, -o, old, ost The old ghost broke his toe and floats so slow. Joe told the host there was no soap in the stone bowl. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ 115
  123. 123. Long (u) spelling patterns: u-e, ue, ui, ew I saw a funny mule wearing a new blue suit. The cute fruit fly flew into the glue. ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or an exclamation point. Please illustrate one of your sentences. 116
  124. 124. Bye-bye - e”: Suffix (-ed) and (-ing) Bye-bye - e” Rule: Drop the “e” (at the end of a base word) before adding a suffix that begins with a vowel. Suffixes are endings (-ing, -ed) added to base/root words that show action. Ex: race ends with the vowel e; therefore drop it when adding -ed—because the suffix -ed begins with a vowel. race - raced Ex: The base word “ride” ends with “e”; this (e) is dropped (bye-bye) when adding a suffix (ending) that begins with a vowel – (-ing) begins with the vowel “i”. ride - riding A double vowel would be incorrect (rideing). These base words show action; sometimes we call an action word a “doing” word or verb. Read the words listed below. bake baked baking chase chased chasing dine dined dining hike hiked hiking hope hoped hoping judge judged judging live lived living love loved loving race raced racing trade traded trading use used using wave waved waving 117
  125. 125. Dictation/Spelling Practice for (bye-bye “e”) words. Review—Bye-bye - e” spelling rule: Drop final “e” before adding a suffix that begins with a vowel, (-ing) (-ed) example: take – taking. Remember to drop the e (at the end of the base word) when adding a suffix that begins with a vowel. ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Read these sentences. I baked a cake and hoped for the best. I chased my friend and raced away. Jack hoped to go hiking today. I hope I get a prize after the judging. I traded my skates for a used bike. I asked Deb if I could use her eraser. I waved to the dragon that lived in a cave. Mom smiled and gave me a loving hug. I placed the gift and smiled at the child. As Dad was leaving he closed the door behind him. I closed the box and moved it away. I waved at Jon when we passed him. I used to live in Del Mar and loved living by the beach. My cat died. She used to hunt mice. 118
  126. 126. Create two original sentences. Include one or more base words + (-ed) or (-ing) in each sentence. Remember these base words show “action”. Your writing should reflect correct spelling, good penmanship, proper spacing, and correct usage of upper and lower case letters. Remember all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period (.), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!). ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Please illustrate your favorite sentence. 119
  127. 127. Skill: Contractions A contraction is a short way of writing two words as a single word. It is formed by combining two words but omitting one or more letters. Always write an apostrophe (’) to show where one or more letters are left out. Read these contractions. are not aren't We aren't going today. can not can't We can't go today. do not don't We don't eat candy. does not doesn't John doesn't eat candy. did not didn't The dog didn't eat candy. have not haven't I haven't seen the show. has not hasn't Sue hasn't seen the show. is not isn't Jack isn't going to the game. could not couldn't We couldn't go to the game. should not shouldn't We shouldn't go to the game. would not wouldn't We wouldn't go to the game. ought not oughtn't We oughtn't go to the game. must not mustn't We mustn't go to the game. was not wasn't Tom wasn't at home. were not weren't We weren't at home. how did how'd How'd it happen? who did who'd Who'd believe it? why did why'd Why'd it happen?. 120
  128. 128. I will I'll I'll come home. you will you'll You'll come home. he will he'll He'll come home. she will she'll She'll come home. we will we'll We'll come home. they will they'll They'll come home. who will who'll Who'll come home. it will it'll It'll be lots of fun. that will that'll That'll be lots of fun. I would I'd I'd like a peach tart. you would you'd You'd like a peach tart. he would he'd He'd like a peach tart. she would she'd She'd like a peach tart. they would they'd They'd like a peach tart. here is here's Here's the morning meal. how is how's How's the morning meal? it is it's It's the morning meal. that is that's That's the morning meal. there is there's There's the morning meal. what is what's What's the morning meal? when is when's When's the morning meal? where is where's Where's the morning meal? why is why's Why's the President here? who is who's Who's the President? 121
  129. 129. I have I've I've seen the play. you have you've You've seen the play. we have we've We've seen the play. they have they've They've seen the play. could have could've He could've seen the play. should have should've He should've seen the play. would have would've She would've seen the play. might have might've Jack might've seen the play. must have must've Jill must've seen the play. I am I'm I'm a responsible student. you are you're You're a responsible student. he is he's He's a responsible student. she is she's She's a responsible student. we are we're We're responsible students. they are they're They're responsible students. let us let's Let's have a party. madam ma'am Is this your dog, ma'am? of the clock o'clock I can be there at one o'clock. will not won't We won't fail today. 122

×