1 a class 6

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1 a class 6

  1. 1. CLASS 6EWRT 1A
  2. 2. AGENDA• Grammar: When to use “Me” and when to use “Myself.”• The Hunger Games: What is your take on the game so far?• Writing Discussion: “Exploring your present perspective” and “The Thesis Statement” • In-Class Writing: Finding your present perspective Formulating a Thesis• Group Work/Discussion: Bragg: “Analyzing Writing Strategies #1 p 36: Comparing• In-Class Writing: Similes and Metaphors• Preparing the complete draft: SMG 52-53
  3. 3. Me versus Myself Me Myself• Me is an object pronoun, which • Myself is a reflexive or stressed means that it refers to the pronoun, which means that, person that the action of a verb generally speaking, it should be is being done to, or to which a used in conjunction with the preposition refers. subject pronoun I, not instead of the object pronoun me.• They want me to study more.• Tell me a story. • I bought myself a car.• Between you and me, hes right.• Carol wants to meet with John • I myself started the company. and me tomorrow. • I did the laundry by myself.• The book was written entirely by • I feel like myself again. me. • Tired of waiting, I just did it• Please call Hillary or me with myself. any questions.
  4. 4. The Strategy Continued: Explore Your Present Perspective • Looking back, how do you feel about this event? If you understand it differently now than you did then, what is the difference? • What do your actions at the time of the event say about the kind of person you were then? How would you respond to the same event if it occurred today? • Can looking at the event historically or culturally help explain what happened? For example, did you upset racial, gender, or religious expectations? Did you feel torn between identities or cultures? Did you feel out of place? • Do you see now that there was a conflict underlying the event? For example, were you struggling with contradictory desires? Did you feel pressured by others? Were you desires and rights in conflict with someone else’s? Was the event about power or responsibility. • Pause to reflect on what you have written about your present perspective. Then write another sentence or two, commenting on the event’s significance as you look back on it
  5. 5. Goal: Formulating a Tentative Thesis• Readers do not expect you to begin your narrative essay with the kind of explicit thesis statement typical of argumentative or explanatory writing. If you do decide to tell readers explicitly why the event was meaningful or significant, you will most likely do so as you tell the story, by commenting on or evaluating what happened, instead of announcing the significance at the beginning. Keep in mind that you are not obliged to tell readers the significance, but you must show it through the way you tell the story.
  6. 6. The Strategy• Review what you wrote for Reflecting on the Event’s Significance, and add another two or three sentences, not necessarily summarizing what you already have written but extending your insights into the significance of the event, what it meant to you at the time, and what it means to you now. These sentences must necessarily be speculative and tentative because you may not fully understand the event’s significance in your life
  7. 7. Bragg: “Analyzing Writing Strategies #1 p 36• Read “Analyzing Writing Strategies” #1 aloud.• Get into groups of three or four, and locate the comparisons in paragraphs 1, 3, 7, 9, 13, and 16.• As a group, pick the one you think works well and make notes about why.• What impression do these comparisons give you of the young Bragg and the event he is writing about?
  8. 8. METAPHOR: A LITERARY FIGURE OF SPEECH THAT DESCRIBES ASUBJECT BY ASSERTING THAT IT IS, ON SOME POINT OFCOMPARISON, THE SAME AS ANOTHER OTHERWISE UNRELATEDOBJECT. ALL THE WORLD’S A STAGESIMILE: A FIGURE OF SPEECH THAT DIRECTLY COMPARES TWODIFFERENT THINGS, USUALLY BY EMPLOYING THE WORDS “LIKE”OR “AS.” I’VE BEEN WORKING LIKE A DOGFormulate 5-7 metaphors or similes appropriate to youressay.
  9. 9. SMG 52-53Preparingthecompletedraft
  10. 10. HOMEWORK• Read: Catch up on HG (You should be through chapter 12.• Write: Complete Draft of Essay #2• Blog Prompt #5: Journal• Study: Vocabulary Review (1-12)• Bring: Three clean, complete copies of your draft; SMG

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