Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Class 2 online

131 views

Published on

ewrt 1a class 2

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Class 2 online

  1. 1. Ewrt 1A Class 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFMhbxAv-Hk
  2. 2. Types of Sentences 1. Simple 2. Compound 3. Complex
  3. 3. #1: Simple Sentence  A simple sentence has one subject and one verb  I like to study grammar.  A simple sentence is also called an independent clause.  An independent clause ends with a period or semicolon.
  4. 4. Simple Sentences  Examples:  Carol’s sweater is red.  You and Alex need to be quiet.  Ms. Bennett did a cartwheel and a backflip.
  5. 5. #2: Compound Sentence  A compound sentence is made up of two or more simple sentences joined by one of the following:  A comma and a coordinating conjunction  I like to study grammar, and I love this class.  A semicolon  I like to study grammar; I love this class.  A semicolon and an adverbial conjunction  I like to study grammar; therefore, I love this class.
  6. 6. Coordinating Conjunctions  Coordinating Conjunctions are used to join together two independent clauses.  Examples:  For  And  Nor  But  Or  Yet  So
  7. 7. Two independent clauses joined together I love you, and you love me. Independent clause Independent clause
  8. 8. Semicolons  “If the relation between the ideas expressed in the main clauses is very close and obvious without a conjunction, you can separate the clauses with a semicolon” (Little, Brown Handbook, 9th Edition, p. 361).
  9. 9. COMPOUND SENTENCE: SEMICOLON Kelsey has benefited from her writing exercises; she has good grammar and punctuation. Tiffany works in San Francisco; she runs The Duck. Elaine pays attention in class; she takes copious notes
  10. 10. COMPOUND SENTENCE: adverbial conjunctions MOREOVER HOWEVER NEVERTHELESS OTHERWISE THEREFORE
  11. 11. COMPOUND SENTENCE: CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS Thomas is cool; moreover, he is fashionable . Luke’s grandmother buys him sweaters; however, he does not wear them. Clause 1 Clause 2 Independent Independent
  12. 12. #3: Complex Sentence#3: Complex Sentence  A complex sentence is a simple sentence (independent clause) to which a part of a sentence (dependent clause) has been added.  Because I like to study grammar, I love this class.  I love this class because I like to study grammar.
  13. 13. A dependent clause joined to an independent clause. (The dependent clause needs the rest of the sentence for support.) Because you love me, I love you. Dependent clause Independent clause
  14. 14. A dependent clause contains a subject and verb. It begins with a subordinating conjunction, and thus it does not express a completed thought. A dependent clause is also called a subordinate clause. Dependent clauses, like babies, cannot stand alone. Because you love me. Fragment!
  15. 15. A Tip on Punctuation  Since dependent clauses are only part of a sentence, you can never connect them to another sentence with a semicolon. Semicolons are only used between two independent clauses.  I have loved you for years ; although I never admitted it.  I have loved you for years, although I never admitted it. OK No!
  16. 16. Common Subordinating (Dependent) Conjunctions after even if now that that where although even though once though whereas as if rather than unless wherever as if whenever since until whether because in order that so that when which before than in case while
  17. 17. Complex Sentences  Examples:  When Trey was little, he played with blocks.  After class, good students study.  If I pass 1A, I will take 1B.  Use the stairs in case of fire.  Ava stands at the bottom of the cliff while the climber moves up the rock.
  18. 18. Watch the video on the next page for more explanation!  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98OcAe5O0Ws
  19. 19. A Fourth Type of Sentence: Let’s get serious! 1. Simple 2. Compound 3. Complex 4. Compound-complex
  20. 20. #4: Compound/Complex Sentence #4: Compound/Complex Sentence  A compound/complex sentence is the last and most complicated type of sentence. It is composed by combining a compound sentences with a complex sentence.  It contains at least one dependent clause and at least two independent clauses.
  21. 21. A dependent clause added to two or more independent clauses Because we are a family, I love you, and you love me. 2 independent clauses Dependent clause
  22. 22. Compound Complex Sentences Example:  Laura forgot her friend’s birthday, so she sent her a card when she finally remembered.
  23. 23. Simple Compound Complex Compound/ complex Every sentence in English fits into one of these four categories,
  24. 24. Think You’ve Got It?  1 independent clause = simple sentence  Don’t’ forget: These can have compound subjects and predicates!  2 independent clauses = compound sentence  1 or more dependent clause + 1 independent clause = complex sentence  2 or more independent clauses + 1 or more dep. clause = compound complex sentence
  25. 25. Let’s Review…
  26. 26. Simple, Compound, or Complex?  The teacher walked into the classroom, greeted the students, and took attendance.
  27. 27. Simple, Compound, or Complex?  The teacher walked into the classroom, greeted the students, and took attendance.  SIMPLE:  Subject: “the teacher”  Compound Predicate “walked into the classroom, greeted the students, and took attendance.”
  28. 28. Simple, Compound, or Complex?  Juan played football while Juanita went shopping.
  29. 29. Simple, Compound, or Complex?  Juan played football while Juanita went shopping.  COMPLEX  Independent Clause: Juan played football  Subordinate Clause: while (subordinating conjunction) Juanita went shopping.
  30. 30. Simple, Compound, or Complex?  Juan played football, yet Juanita went shopping.
  31. 31. Simple, Compound, or Complex?  Juan played football, yet Juanita went shopping.  COMPOUND  Juan played football, yet (coordinating conjunction)  Juanita went shopping.
  32. 32. Simple, Compound, or Complex?  After Reggie passed the test, he went to the bar to celebrate!
  33. 33. Simple, Compound, or Complex?  After Reggie passed the test, he went to the bar to celebrate!  COMPLEX  After (subordinating conjunction) Reggie passed the test,  he went to the bar to celebrate!
  34. 34. CONGRATULATIONS! YOU NOW KNOW EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW • To write anything you want to write • Any way you want to write it • And still get the punctuation right each time!
  35. 35. Writing Sentences Write two of each kind of sentence and post them for homework. Make the sentences relevant to your essay #1 outline. 1.Simple 2.Compound 3.Complex 4.Compound-complex
  36. 36. Example of Sentence Homework 1. Simple 1. I love to travel. 2. The plane twisted and stalled. 2. Compound 1. I crawled out of the wreckage, and I saw a man and a woman who appeared to be dead. 2. I stumbled toward them to check; neither one was breathing. 3. Complex 1. Wherever I looked, I saw more motionless people. 2. After recovering from my shock, I headed toward the back of the plane. 4. Compound Complex 1. Because I didn’t know what kind of danger I might face, I had difficulty choosing a weapon from among the many I found, but I settled on a small knife. 2. Rather than wear my tennis shoes, I grabbed a pair of waterproof hiking boots from an open suitcase; however, I did not grab the socks that lay next to them.
  37. 37. REVIEW: How to Answer The In-Class Essay Question  Write an essay arguing for the supplies you have chosen to take with you into the wild. Present the issue to readers, and develop an argument for the purpose of confirming, challenging, or changing your readers’ views on which supplies are the most important for survival.  Your final essay should be around 500 words. This will be around four pages, hand written. This, of course, is an estimate. Handwriting varies greatly. Between three and six pages will likely be the norm for this essay.  Good Luck! May the odds be ever in your favor
  38. 38. Introduction and Thesis  Focus your presentation of the issue: Your introduction should explain to the reader both the situation you face and why you have limited resources.  Thesis: Compose a thesis that makes your position unambiguous, appropriately qualified, and clearly arguable. (Your thesis will likely be near the end of your introduction).
  39. 39. Body Paragraphs  Paragraph one: topic sentence supporting your first item.  Give reasons for your choice and support them with examples, scenarios, or anecdotes.   Paragraph two: topic sentence supporting your second item.  Give reasons for your choice and support them with examples, scenarios, or anecdotes.  Additional Paragraphs: Repeat using the same or similar strategies
  40. 40. Counterargument:  Write a counterargument that addresses why you wouldn’t take the items the other people in your group think are very important. You should address specific tools others in your group chose to take. You may do this in each body paragraph as you argue for your choice, or you may do it as a separate paragraph after you finish arguing for your tools.  For example, you might start by writing, “while some people might prefer a sleeping bag, I found it to be a poor choice compared to the blanket.” Then you can explain why.
  41. 41. Conclusion:  If your adventure is over, describe how it ended and how you have recovered, suffered, or benefitted from it. OR  If the adventure is ongoing, consider predicting your future in the wild.  What are you chances of success?  What do you see as your biggest challenge?  How might you fail?
  42. 42. Watch the brief video on the next slide for more help with writing an argument essay  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lzGy5gizKg
  43. 43. HOMEWORK  Read: HG through chapter 2.  Post #2: Eight sentences—Two of each of the four types you practiced in the slide presentation. Make sure they are relevant to your essay so you can include similar sentences in your in-class essay. You may not copy these directly into your essay.

×