Ted406 session 4

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Reading Assessments: What are we assessing?
Overview of Rakes & Smith

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Ted406 session 4

  1. 1. Reading Assessment:What are we assessing?<br />TED 406 Fall 2010<br />Session 4<br />Jill A. Aguilar, Ph.D.<br />
  2. 2. We can be assessing…<br />READERS,<br />TEXTS,<br />CONTEXTS,<br />CONTENT…<br />
  3. 3. Secondary Texts<br />Secondary texts are often more difficult than elementary texts for 2 main reasons:<br />1 the vocabulary, concepts, and “readability” (estimated grade level= length of words, number of words per sentences, number of sentences per paragraph) are higher than students are comfortable with, and<br />2 they are typically written in expository, rather than narrative style.<br />
  4. 4. Expository Texts<br /><ul><li>Expository texts set out to describe objects, events or processes in an objective manner, present or convey an argument, to state the solution to a problem or to explain a situation.
  5. 5. Most elementary students learn to read using narrative texts and trade texts. Narrative is a genre or text type which tells a story or gives an account of real or imaginary events. It includes an orientation, a complication, a climax and a resolution.</li></li></ul><li>Task 1: Learning About Students<br />For Task 1, you want to know how your students can be expected to interact with and perform in specific subject matter materials in order to make appropriate instructional decisions.<br />
  6. 6. A few points about assessment…<br />
  7. 7. 1. Assess what you intend to assess.<br />Often teachers assess reading skills when they want to assess content knowledge, and content knowledge when they want to assess reading skills.<br />Ask, will the results of this assessment tell me how well my students read, or how much and what they know about [algebra]?<br />
  8. 8. 1. Assess what you intend to assess.<br />What are you assessing? <br />Prior knowledge about a topic you plan to teach<br />Reading knowledge and skills in English<br />Studying knowledge and skills in English<br />Skills in reasoning and logic<br />Attitudes toward school<br />Experience and knowledge about taking standardized tests<br />Knowledge about a topic you are presently teaching<br />Knowledge and skills acquired from a unit you have finished teaching<br />Knowledge and skill acquired from your course by the end of the year<br />
  9. 9. 2. Once you have identified your target, state your purpose.<br />For what purpose(s) are you assessing?<br />Formal (valid & reliable) v. Informal (may or may not be valid and reliable)<br />Valid- assesses what it purports to assess<br />Reliable- assesses various groups at different times in the same way<br />Survey (a snapshot; may be used before, during, after teaching)<br />Formative (the teaching is still teaching the topic) v. Summative (the teacher is done teaching that topic)<br />Criterion-Based (everyone can score 100%) v. Standardized (follows a normal curve)<br />
  10. 10. 3. Once you have assessed,analyze your assessment.<br />If it was worth assessing, it is worth analyzing. What do these data mean? What are their implications for your next steps in instruction?<br />Faculty-wide: Analyze school-wide CST data<br />Departments: Analyze departmental CST data<br />SLC’s, Cores, etc.: Analyze the longitudinal data for your students<br />Teachers: Analyze your pre-assessment, checks for understanding, other formative assessments, and your summative assessments.<br />
  11. 11. 3. Once you have assessed,analyze your assessment.<br />Teachers, Ask:<br />Where are your students now?<br />How far have they come?<br />What has been easy? What has been difficult? Why?<br />Where should they go next?<br />How should they get there?<br />
  12. 12. The MOST VALUABLE TYPE OF ASSESSMENT FOR TEACHERS IS…<br />Ongoing, informal assessment that matches the types of learning activities that students have been engaged in…<br />
  13. 13. Principles of assessment<br />Procedures and instruments must be content specific;<br />Easily constructed and scored;<br />Group administered;<br />Representative of the types of reading skills that students would be expected to use in their science, history, or other subject area classes<br />
  14. 14. For Task 1<br />you want to know how your students can be expected to interact with and perform in specific subject matter materials in order to make appropriate instructional decisions.<br />
  15. 15. Types of assessments inRakes & Smith:<br />Surveying Content Area Reading Interests<br />Background Knowledge and Reader Interest Surveys help the teacher evaluate student interest, attitude, and prior knowledge.<br />Open-ended projective<br />Structured, paired choice<br />Summated or agree/disagree<br />Semantic differential<br />
  16. 16. Types of assessments inRakes & Smith:<br />Group Reading Inventory<br />Especially useful for courses that are textbook-dependent like Social Studies, Science, and Math.<br />Part One—Using Book Parts<br />Part Two—Silent Reading<br />
  17. 17. Types of assessments inRakes & Smith:<br />Cloze Inventory<br />Helps tell which students can and cannot read the book from which the Cloze Inventory is taken; how good is the match between students and text?<br />Independent Level (96-100%): Student can read text on her/his own and comprehend without instruction<br />Instructional Level (90-95%): Student can comprehend the text with assistance<br />Frustration Level (-94%): Student requires more assistance than is practical; the text is probably too difficult<br />
  18. 18. Types of assessments inRakes & Smith:<br />Interactive Assessments (more appropriate over time)<br />Checklists<br />Interviews<br />Portfolios<br />

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