Chinese exclusion Act

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Chinese exclusion Act

  1. 2. Early Chinese Immigration <ul><li>In the 1800s, Chinese government was unstable </li></ul><ul><li>The Gold Rush in California offered young Chinese men the opportunity to earn a fortune by taking a 60 day journey over the Pacific Ocean and trying that hand at mining in the gold fields. </li></ul><ul><li>By the year 1852 over 20,000 Chinese immigrants had immigrated to the United States </li></ul>
  2. 3. Competition Leads to Violence <ul><li>While in the mining fields, white miners resented Chinese competition </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese miners were forced to operate in less desirable sites and worked In large numbers for protection </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese were called “a danger to the welfare of the state of California” and a special tax was passed that forced Chinese to pay ½ of their wages to the state </li></ul><ul><li>Atrocities against Chinese became common “a Chinaman’s chance”=no chance at all </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese and Native Americans could not testify against whites </li></ul><ul><li>Many Chinese left the gold mining fields for Chinatown in San Francisco or returned home to China </li></ul>
  3. 4. Transcontinental Railroad <ul><li>July 1862, Congress passed the Pacific Railroad Act, this gave the Central Pacific & the Union Pacific approval to construct the RR </li></ul><ul><li>Central Pacific could not find white men to lay the dangerous tracks so they recruited Chinese laborers (500-1,000 men lost their lives) </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese workers were paid $35 per month but had to provide their own food </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese laid about 1 mile of track per day </li></ul><ul><li>In 1869 the Trans-Continental Railroad was completed but the Chinese were not recognized for their labor </li></ul>
  4. 6. Anti-Chinese Violence <ul><li>The 1870s was a downturn in American economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Unemployment increased, whites blamed the Chinese for taking their jobs </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Forced to shave off queues (braids) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Taxed Chinese laundries out of business </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Children prohibited from attending public school </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1882 Chinese Exclusion Act designed to stop nearly all immigration from China (immigrants allowed: teachers, students merchants, and those related to American citizens) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 7. Angel Island Processing Center <ul><li>Between 1910-1940, all Chinese arriving in America were processed on Angel Island </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese were taken to barracks for processing. </li></ul><ul><li>At any given time the barracks would hold </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>200-300 men </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>30-50 women </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>The process could take weeks and even several months before officials processed their immigration papers and interrogated them </li></ul><ul><li>The interrogation forced Chinese immigrants to prove they were merchants, teachers, or joining an American citizen family member, otherwise they were sent back </li></ul>

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