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Japanese Internment 1942-1945
Understanding Japanese Americans <ul><li>Issei –(first generation) Japanese immigrant living in the US </li></ul><ul><li>N...
<ul><li>In 1942, the US Government ordered more then 120,000 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry to be evacuated...
 
Manzanar <ul><li>Located in Owens Valley </li></ul><ul><li>4,000’ elevation in the Sierra Nevada Mts.  </li></ul><ul><li>S...
<ul><li>In 1942, the US Army leased 6,200 acres from the city of Los Angeles to  build the detainment facility at Manzanar...
 
Housing <ul><li>Camps were enclosed with barbed wire and several watch towers </li></ul><ul><li>Camps were build quickly d...
Life in the Interment Camps <ul><li>Families lived in unsanitary conditions (open sewers), communal toilet and bathing fac...
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Japanese Internment

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Japanese Internment

  1. 1. Japanese Internment 1942-1945
  2. 2. Understanding Japanese Americans <ul><li>Issei –(first generation) Japanese immigrant living in the US </li></ul><ul><li>Nisei – (second generation) A child born in the US to people of Japanese ancestry from Japan </li></ul><ul><li>Sansei – (third generation) A child born to the Nisei, most assimilated into American culture </li></ul><ul><li>The Issei were though of as the most dangerous, because many felt they were spies for Japan or still closely tied to their mother country </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>In 1942, the US Government ordered more then 120,000 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry to be evacuated to detaining facilities for the duration of the war </li></ul><ul><li>Ten internment camps were established throughout the US </li></ul><ul><li>FDR issued Executive Order 9066 on Feb 19, 1942 which informed the Japanese & Japanese Americans of this evacuation </li></ul><ul><li>Given just days to pack up their belongings and report to the “check-in” locations (Horse tracks & fair grounds) </li></ul><ul><li>Many Japanese & Japanese Americans lost their homes, businesses, and all their worldly possessions </li></ul>
  4. 5. Manzanar <ul><li>Located in Owens Valley </li></ul><ul><li>4,000’ elevation in the Sierra Nevada Mts. </li></ul><ul><li>Summer time temperatures over 100 °F </li></ul><ul><li>Winter time temperatures average around 40°F </li></ul><ul><li>Year round nighttime temperatures 30-40°F </li></ul>
  5. 6. <ul><li>In 1942, the US Army leased 6,200 acres from the city of Los Angeles to build the detainment facility at Manzanar </li></ul><ul><li>Although some residents of the Owens Valley may have opposed this construction, many helped build and work in the facility during the war </li></ul><ul><li>Japanese resentment continued to build as more Japanese & Japanese Americans were forced to leave their homes </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;I am for the immediate removal of every Japanese on the West Coast to a point deep in the interior. I don't mean a nice part of the interior either. Herd 'em up, pack 'em off and give 'em the inside room in the badlands. Personally, I hate the Japanese. And that goes for all of them.&quot; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;A viper is nonetheless a viper whenever the egg is hatched - so a Japanese American, born of Japanese parents - grows up to be a Japanese, not an American.&quot; </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 8. Housing <ul><li>Camps were enclosed with barbed wire and several watch towers </li></ul><ul><li>Camps were build quickly during the summer of 1942 so not much detail or planning went into their construction </li></ul><ul><li>Residences were long 100’x 20’ military style barracks, this was then divided into four “homes” </li></ul><ul><li>Each 20’x25’ room housed 8-9 people with eight cots 7’x3’ leaving very little space for anything else </li></ul>
  7. 9. Life in the Interment Camps <ul><li>Families lived in unsanitary conditions (open sewers), communal toilet and bathing facilities </li></ul><ul><li>Japanese “inmates” stood in line for everything: meals, latrines, supplies, and services </li></ul><ul><li>Meals were nutritionally inadequate </li></ul><ul><li>Medical care was minimal </li></ul><ul><li>Children did attend school (where they pledged allegiance to the American flag every morning) </li></ul><ul><li>Adults worked in the camp offices, mess halls, schools, hospitals, and war time production facilities </li></ul><ul><li>For their work, adults earned $8-$16 per month for their 44 hour work week, paid in scrip so they could only use the money to buy things within the camp </li></ul>

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