Spatial Mapping Tools for  Trans-disciplinary Group Innovation . InSciT2006 Conference T.Rosenberg and M.Waller Goldsmiths
<ul><li>What we are currently researching, designing and developing – and will describe here - is  an interactive Co-innov...
<ul><li>The essential idea of the iCE is to stimulate, help generate and make visible thinking so that individuals may app...
<ul><li>The iCE, as we have stated above, is a number of tools that are useful in an innovation project – whether that be ...
<ul><li>1)The  team formation space  houses tools to help build teams; using character types, across roles, in teams or gr...
3) The  evaluation space  allows the collective to evaluate the ideas and the ideational process. It re-connects ideation ...
<ul><li>The iCE is conceived in and as a virtual space. We understand virtual in two regards: virtual in the sense that in...
<ul><li>We have conceived the iCE against a backdrop of a shifting epistemic landscape; a landscape that has engendered ne...
In the last fifty years we have witnessed an enormous change in the way we think and are/can be creative, linked to variou...
<ul><li>The post-modern period heralded the demise of the creative humanist imagination with its idea of the human subject...
<ul><li>The inter-connection of imaginings occurs in the ideational space of the iCE. Imagining is re-presented, provoked,...
<ul><li>The first research project was an attempt to plot patterns of creative thinking ( flights of the imagination). The...
<ul><li>The first plottings of these patterns were produced using the metaphors of water and earth (ground) to signal know...
<ul><li>We found that by extending these plottings so that they are articulated, consciously across space and through time...
<ul><li>In time we looked at movements back and forward on timelines, moving in different rhythms in the timelines. We loo...
<ul><li>The dark framed square is the ‘prospect’ of the particular locus one is moving back or forward in time. In forecas...
Backcasting one looks at a ‘tendency pattern’, as in forecasting, but makes a leap into the future and works the tendency ...
<ul><li>The spatialisation of innovatory thinking, unfolds and plays in and with space – a s(p)lay (Doel). There may be di...
<ul><li>Above are two illustrations of spiral dynamics viz. static (on the left) and dynamic spiral. The ‘object’ of thoug...
By contrast, the erratic leaps make connections across apparently unlikely areas for connection. A paradigm or syntagm shi...
<ul><li>The second research area underpinning the iCE was an attempt to produce a skeletal map of practice. The map was pr...
<ul><li>The  consumption space </li></ul><ul><li>The  production space   </li></ul><ul><li>The  intermediary zone </li></u...
The  consumption space  of most practice will contain the same generic features as those above, detailed, perhaps, differe...
<ul><li>The features of the map, become loci for ‘prospecting’. The loci mark areas to know and therefore indicate what ne...
The plottings in space and time may also be brought to the map to animate thinking/imagining through and across the map. T...
<ul><li>The iCE is still being designed and produced.  </li></ul><ul><li>The maps and plottings of the ideational space ha...
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iCE- Interactive Co-innovation Environment Software, Spatial Mapping Tools for Trans-disciplinary Group Innovation: InSciT2006 Conference

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Terence E Rosenberg, Mike Waller
Goldsmiths, University of London, Design Department, London, UNITED KINGDOM

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iCE- Interactive Co-innovation Environment Software, Spatial Mapping Tools for Trans-disciplinary Group Innovation: InSciT2006 Conference

  1. 1. Spatial Mapping Tools for Trans-disciplinary Group Innovation . InSciT2006 Conference T.Rosenberg and M.Waller Goldsmiths
  2. 2. <ul><li>What we are currently researching, designing and developing – and will describe here - is an interactive Co-innovation Environment – which for the rest of the presentation we will abbreviate to iCE. </li></ul><ul><li>Some of the tools we have, and are devising (this is a project in development), may be used in the physical spaces of practice, and have been, but may additionally, be extended to a virtual space and build new possibilities for co(-)operations in and from there. These possibilities include supporting the practice teams/groups, co(-)operating in cyber-space, or it may augment the practice of physically co-located groups/teams. </li></ul>Introduction
  3. 3. <ul><li>The essential idea of the iCE is to stimulate, help generate and make visible thinking so that individuals may appreciate the loci and patterns of their own thinking, but, most especially, it is focussed on the way individuals may appreciate and become involved in, support and build upon and with the thinking of others. </li></ul><ul><li>In ‘brainstorming’, currently the favoured approach to ideation in businesses, thoughts are fired in, in a scatter gun approach. The group then harvest the thoughts and decide on which one to progress. What is not present is ‘thinking’ as process. Thoughts, the outcome of the process are presented – as in it could be this or this or this - but what is not communicated is how the suggestion is arrived at. What is conspicuously absent is the roots (and routes) of thinking and in particular the imagination that gives spur to thinking. </li></ul>The Nub of the iCE
  4. 4. <ul><li>The iCE, as we have stated above, is a number of tools that are useful in an innovation project – whether that be new product development, re-shaping organizations, designing new systems and so on. The iCE is designed as a series of inter-connected spaces housing various tools, useful at various points of a project. We have currently conceived of four spaces: team formation, ideation, evaluation and an archive space. </li></ul>The Architecture
  5. 5. <ul><li>1)The team formation space houses tools to help build teams; using character types, across roles, in teams or groups to create dynamic and fluid relationships, and thus thinking. There is also a briefing tool that helps dissect the brief and see what forces act into and give shape to the brief, so that the project collective may (s)play (lay out and play) with the ur-brief to appreciate and perhaps re-shape the brief. We have housed it in this space because we envisage play between the briefing and team formation. But it equally is pre-cursor to ideation so the tool moves between spaces. </li></ul><ul><li>2)The ideational space is the core of the iCE and therefore warrants a fuller description than the other spaces. It is also more developed than the other spaces. The rest of the paper focuses on this space; description is therefore suspended until a little later in the paper. </li></ul>iCE Spaces
  6. 6. 3) The evaluation space allows the collective to evaluate the ideas and the ideational process. It re-connects ideation to the brief and the ur-brief. It is a space which has different levels of access (the access to the iCE and its spaces is set by the collective, but as they wish may include a wide range of participants and stakeholders). 4) Archive: The archive space has an internal search engine allowing collectives to search through an organisations back catalogue of projects. It also provides possibility for connection beyond the organisation’s space. The internal search engine allows one to search out past projects but also features of projects. For instance one may wish to look for research in all projects on a particular user group and this search engine will allow one to do so. iCE Spaces
  7. 7. <ul><li>The iCE is conceived in and as a virtual space. We understand virtual in two regards: virtual in the sense that innovatory thinking is constructed in imaginings and these are produced in a virtual space (in minds/imaginations), and also in the sense that we will use the virtual spaces of a digital environment to represent, and thus, communicate and play with the virtual spaces of the imagination. </li></ul><ul><li>The aim of this application, to some extent, is focused on how we connect these two virtual spaces in order to support innovatory (thinking) programmes. We have in the project looked at the entwining of these two virtualities – imagination and digital spaces - in relation to innovatory thinking within a creative undertaking. </li></ul>iCE and Imagination
  8. 8. <ul><li>We have conceived the iCE against a backdrop of a shifting epistemic landscape; a landscape that has engendered new concepts of the imagination and shaped new imaginaries of creative practice .These changes (continuing) of imagination and, consequently, creative practices - have been wrought in and through a dynamic ‘calculus’ of forces – political, economic, social and particularly technological (P.E.S.T.). The iCE environment is not only formed in this dynamic calculus and in some measure re-presents it. </li></ul>Imaginaries of the Imagination
  9. 9. In the last fifty years we have witnessed an enormous change in the way we think and are/can be creative, linked to various epistemological constructions of the imagination – wrought through changes in the way we shape and live our lives; and particularly through the various technological prosthetics we produce to support us in this. The internet and the whole idea of an interconnected world has seeped into the very essence of thinking and imagining. The internet has influenced creativity not only in the fact that it is a useful tool for creative practice but also inasmuch as its’ very structure has permeated the way we think and imagine – affecting the structural core of our imaginations. Imaginaries of the Imagination
  10. 10. <ul><li>The post-modern period heralded the demise of the creative humanist imagination with its idea of the human subject as central to the production of original meaning. Post-modern philosophers debunked the ego-logical base of the humanist imagination exposing the limits of an anthropocentric imagination; derailing the stories of progress and emancipation that kept the modernist project on course. </li></ul><ul><li>A new imaginary of the imagination suggests a network of articular imaginings; where the imagining of an individual is jointed to the imagining of others. What others imagine effects the way each one of us imagines (although our individual imagination may be unlike anyone else). The contemporary imagination is not the consensual single imagination of a collective but is a linked plurality of imaginations that emerge as and in a network. </li></ul>Networked Imaginations
  11. 11. <ul><li>The inter-connection of imaginings occurs in the ideational space of the iCE. Imagining is re-presented, provoked, and at times anticipated in the ideational space. </li></ul><ul><li>The ideational space is derived from the integration of two earlier research projects – </li></ul><ul><li>Plottings of thinking patterns. </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping loci of Practice. </li></ul>Ideational Space
  12. 12. <ul><li>The first research project was an attempt to plot patterns of creative thinking ( flights of the imagination). These patterns were derived in trying to discern thinking trajectories figured through a path shaped by the actions of two forces – centripetal and centrifugal. </li></ul><ul><li>The centripetal pulls thought back to what is known – making compossible with established knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>The centrifugal force, in contrast, breaks with what is known and draws into what is not-yet, or, not-ever, knowable. </li></ul><ul><li>Both forces act simultaneously in a programme of innovatory thinking. The push and pull of these forces create different patterns in deriving the anticipated event/object (hypostatization) of the imaginative flight, the ‘prospect’. </li></ul>Plottings
  13. 13. <ul><li>The first plottings of these patterns were produced using the metaphors of water and earth (ground) to signal knowing and not-knowing. The material metaphors (inspired by the work on the material imagination by Bachelard ) were used to plot different thinking patterns e.g. linear, lateral and combinatory thinking. </li></ul>Water and ground
  14. 14. <ul><li>We found that by extending these plottings so that they are articulated, consciously across space and through time (usually space/time) we could derive a number of thinking measures; prospecting tools. </li></ul>Thinking: Space and Time
  15. 15. <ul><li>In time we looked at movements back and forward on timelines, moving in different rhythms in the timelines. We looked to derive beats and pulses of change; moving backwards or forwards from any point. We thus derived representations of different innovatory stratagems, using ‘timings’ – back-casting, fore-casting, back projection and fore-projection. </li></ul>Plottings Diachronous Thinking
  16. 16. <ul><li>The dark framed square is the ‘prospect’ of the particular locus one is moving back or forward in time. In forecasting one starts by looking at the way the object/subject was or would have been some time in the past and how it has changed, and understand the ‘tendency pattern’ given by the beats so that one can anticipate the future. </li></ul>Thinking Beats
  17. 17. Backcasting one looks at a ‘tendency pattern’, as in forecasting, but makes a leap into the future and works the tendency backwards. Fore-projection one works from the past object, without deriving its changing forms between. One just brings it into a present and think how it may be ‘now’. Back-projection jumps back from a guessed future form to the present without reasoning the intervening forms. Thinking Beats
  18. 18. <ul><li>The spatialisation of innovatory thinking, unfolds and plays in and with space – a s(p)lay (Doel). There may be different ways of moving into and out from the object; different kinds of movements as well, from flow, regular step and to erratic leaps. </li></ul>Plotting Dynchronous Thinking
  19. 19. <ul><li>Above are two illustrations of spiral dynamics viz. static (on the left) and dynamic spiral. The ‘object’ of thought – pen (in the illustration) - is held at the centre of the spiral and one ‘prospects’ along a spiral that joins on a contiguous line the objects and spaces that connect to it. </li></ul><ul><li>In new product development one may design towards the pen by considering the design of the room, the wall, the carpet etc., all contiguous and contingent, until one reaches the intended pen. </li></ul>Thinking Flow, Steps and Leaps
  20. 20. By contrast, the erratic leaps make connections across apparently unlikely areas for connection. A paradigm or syntagm shift are erratic connectors. In terms of the ‘prospect’ a paradigm shift would be where one considers one context as if another e.g. the domestic space as a circus (one would design for the home influenced by circus acts) . A syntagm shift is moving an ‘object’ from one context into another. For example thinking moving the domestic lamp onto the street to see what new thoughts this can stimulate with regard to street lighting. Thinking Flow, Steps and Leaps
  21. 21. <ul><li>The second research area underpinning the iCE was an attempt to produce a skeletal map of practice. The map was produced in order to provide locating features for the ‘prospect’ patterns described in the earlier slides. The map was/is produced across three zones viz. production, consumption and an intermediary zone of interpretation, translation and influence (depending on the way the map was/is being used). Into these zones is written the particular features of a practice, particular to the practice mapped. In the iCE the zones are populated by the individual or team/group collective using it, making decisions as to what features of the practice are necessary loci for ‘prospecting’. </li></ul>Practice Map
  22. 22. <ul><li>The consumption space </li></ul><ul><li>The production space </li></ul><ul><li>The intermediary zone </li></ul>Loci of Practice
  23. 23. The consumption space of most practice will contain the same generic features as those above, detailed, perhaps, differently in use. In all innovation, for instance, there is a thing innovated (event, system and in this case diagram ‘object’), there is a user/consumer/reader/operator of the innovation and a place (site) where the innovation will be used/consumed/read/operated. Similarly, the production space may be plotted. It will have the individual innovators avatars as features in the zone. It useful to have detailed in the map other features that influence production lying beyond the ‘innovators’ – production feeders - for instance, manufacturers, suppliers and others with investment in production of the ‘innovatory object’. The intermediary zone acts as a lens into which perceptual accents (changing how the look from one space to the other operates) may be dropped. These may be abstract concepts, political or ethical programmes, or other incidental references; any way of spicing and splicing (sp(l)icing) the producer’s and consumer’s zones. Loci of Practice
  24. 24. <ul><li>The features of the map, become loci for ‘prospecting’. The loci mark areas to know and therefore indicate what needs researching. But, it should be noted that the research needs to be a knowing that also holds unknowing in its core, the potential for what is ‘other’ (not yet). </li></ul>Prospecting
  25. 25. The plottings in space and time may also be brought to the map to animate thinking/imagining through and across the map. The imaginings may be communicated to others in the collective by tracing the vinculum of thought (strings) in the imagining. Members of groups or teams may enter each others imagining or indeed start imagining from the same inspiration triggers (loci on the map). An example of a thinking trace is presented alongsideindicated by the black connecting string. Prospecting The research may be buried (housed in database and linked to the map) in the features of the map.
  26. 26. <ul><li>The iCE is still being designed and produced. </li></ul><ul><li>The maps and plottings of the ideational space have been trialed with our students and with various organizations in physical spaces. With us overseeing the application of the model the participants from various organizations have had acknowledged return. But, most encouraging to us has been in the way students have interpreted and used the model autonomously, to great advantage. It has helped the students, individually and in groups/teams generate and communicate their ideas and reflect on their processes (across a range of design disciplines including graphics, product, system and service design). </li></ul><ul><li>Once the software is produced we believe it will be a useful instrument to shape innovatory thinking in different businesses and creative practices of other kinds and may allow one to re-think the business/practice in different ways. It builds teams where not only ideas are shared but also the very thinking or imagining itself. </li></ul>Conclusion

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