Angelist sko learning presentation

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Angelist sko learning presentation

  1. 1. A  Digital  Game-­‐Based  Learning  Pla4orm  Built  Upon  Cogni:ve  Science  and  Common  Core  Alignment     1
  2. 2. Pyramid  of  Reading  and  Comprehension  Skills                                      Understand                                      Visualize   Reading            Relate  new  informa4on    built  on  prior  knowledge   to  Learn                                          Develop  a  plan                                    Self  correct   “Meta-­‐Cogni:ve”        Phonics,  phonemic  awareness                          Decode  new  words   Learning  to  Read                        Read  fluently   “Advanced  Cogni:ve”          Short-­‐term  memory   Pre-­‐Reading  Skills      Relate  parts  to  a  whole   “Basic  Cogni:ve”              Place  things  in  logical  order   2 www.SKOlearning.com
  3. 3. Educa:onal  Games  as  a  21st  Century  Learning  Modality  •  Learning  is  changing  from  recall  and  repeat  informa:on  to  find  it,  evaluate   it  and  use  it  at  the  right  :me  and  in  the  right  context   –  20th  century  educa:on  -­‐  acquisi:on  of  basic  skills   –  21st  century  success  =  higher  order  skills  -­‐    solving  complex  problems,  interac:ng   cri:cally  through  language  and  media   •  Games  naturally  support  this  form  of  educa:on.    •  Games  are  designed  to  create  a  compelling  complex  world   –  Players  learn  through  self-­‐directed  explora:on   –  Learning  is  “just-­‐in-­‐:me”     –  Players  use  feedback  data  to  understand  how  they  are  doing,  what  they  need  to  work   on  and  where  to  go  next   –  Games  create  need  to  know,  a  need  to  ask,  examine,  assimilate       –  Games  encourage  failing  to  reach  the  goal  established  by  a  game’s  rules   –  Games  give  players  permission  to  take  risks  not  possible  in  “real  life”     –  Games  ac:vate  tenacity  and  persistence  required  for  effec:ve  learning   www.SKOlearning.com 3
  4. 4. Educa:onal  Games  •  A  large  body  of  scien:fic  research/literature  supports  the   use  of  educa:onal  games  as  an  effec:ve  and  vital   component  of  the  learning  process.  •  The  armed  forces,  medical  schools,  and  civilian  airlines  have   been  using  digital  game-­‐based  learning  for  quite  some  :me.   www.SKOlearning.com 4
  5. 5.  Educa:onal  Games  •  Provide  brain  training  and  Literacy  development  •  Proven  effec:ve  with  over  50,000  students   in  >  100  schools   –  Qualita:vely  and  quan:ta:vely  proven  to  be  engaging   –  Scien:fically  proven  to  increase  literacy  and  cogni:ve  skills  •  Developed  by  leading  cogni:ve  psychologists,  educators   and  video  game  developers  •  For  Kindergarten  through  Middle  School   www.SKOlearning.com 5
  6. 6. Learning  Made  Fun   Ramps  to  Reading  and  SkateKids  are  digital   literacy  and  cogni:ve  skill  development   programs  that  immerse  children  in  a  video   game-­‐based  virtual  world.   These  state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art  programs  combine  the  latest  research   in  contemporary  cogni:ve-­‐neuropsychology  with   sophis:cated  gaming  theory.  Their  efficacy  has  been  clinically   and  empirically  validated.     The  digital  game-­‐based  learning  environment  is  appropriate   for  learners  of  all  abili:es,  and  looks  and  feels  like  the  games   that  today’s  children  love  to  play.  The  ac:vi:es  are  fully   adap:ve  so  kids  are  never  bored,  never  overwhelmed,  and   always  learning.   www.SKOlearning.com 6
  7. 7. Why  It  Works:   Collabora:on  among   three  disciplines        SkateKids™  and  Ramps                        to  Reading™  were          developed  as  a  joint                        effort  between          educators,  cogni:ve  psychologists  and  digital                                          game  designers.   7
  8. 8. for  Primary  Grades  •  Fine  motor  skills  •  Keyboarding  and  mouse  func:ons  •  Basic  cogni:ve  skills   –  Selec:ve  a]en:on   –  Memory   –  Sequencing   –  Planning  •  Phonics  and  phonemic  awareness  •                           Reading  fluency  and  comprehension   8 www.SKOlearning.com
  9. 9. for  Grades  3-­‐8  •  Builds  on  the  Ramps  to  Reading  founda:on  by   providing  a  dynamic  virtual  environment  that   con:nually  adapts  to  the  abili:es  of  each  individual   student   –  Great  selec:on  of  scien:fically  designed  games   –  Uses  vocabulary  of  5,000  words   –  Virtual  library  and  gigan:c  virtual  mall  •  Develops  more  advanced  “meta-­‐cogni:ve”  skills   that  are  vital  to  learning   –  Visualizing   –  Developing  a  plan   –  Solving  problems   –  Self-­‐correc:ng  based  on  feedback   –  Comprehending  and  using  what  is  read   9 www.SKOlearning.com
  10. 10. Crea:ng  Long-­‐term  Engagement  Virtual  World  and  social  networking  features  linked  to  student  progress  in  the  games  mo:vates  long-­‐term  engagement  making  learning  enduring  and  transferable   •  Virtual  economy   –  Credits  earned  when  levels  are  completed   –  Students  create  and  customize  their  homes  and  neighborhoods   –  Contextually  teaches  saving,  planning  for  purchases  and  delayed  gra:fica:on   –  Mall  with  stores  and  hundreds  of  items  to  purchase  with  earned  credits   •  Library  with  leveled  ebooks,  music  and  more   •  Avatars:    Clothing,  hairstyles  and  personal  items  purchased  in  mall   •  Social  networking  features   –  Virtual  smartphone   •  Safe  tex:ng  and  communica:on   •  Daily  messages  to  students   –  Neighborhood:    Visit  the  “homes”   of  friends  in  your  network   –  Friends  List:    Keep  up  with  what  they  are  doing     10
  11. 11. World-­‐Renowned  Expert  on  Helping  Children  Learn  The  proven  science  behind  SkateKids™  and  Ramps  to  Reading™  is  based  on  modern  cogni:ve  and  psychology  theory  combined  with  Dr.  Jack  Naglieri’s  state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art  research  on  intelligence  and  assessing  /  developing  cogni:ve  ability.   •  Dr.  Jack  Naglieri  is  the  developer   of  the  most  widely  used  tests  –   worldwide  –  of  intelligence  and   ability  including  general  ability,   gigedness,  and  au:sm   •  Professor  at  University  of  Virginia,   Ohio  State,  George  Mason   University   •  Author  of  16  books  &  more  than   250  scien:fic  papers  on   intelligence,  LD,    ADHD,  au:sm,   academic  instruc:on,  and  more   11
  12. 12. Neuroscience-­‐based  Learning  Principles:    PASS  Theory    Key  connec:on  among  cogni:ve  processes,  learning,  and   transfer  of  skill  development     Naglieri,  J.,  Fletcher,  M.,  and  Das,  J.P.     12   www.SKOlearning.com
  13. 13. Proof  of  Engagement  and  Efficacy  Collected  usage  data  from  over  50,000  students   •  Over  35,000  unsolicited  student  comments     •  Average  session  :me  of  15  minutes   •  Students  love  learning  with  our  programs   Four  separate  research  studies  were  performed  with  general  and  clinical   popula:ons.  In  each  case,  significant  improvements  in  literacy  and   cogni:ve  development  were  observed:   •  Reading  Fluency  of  students  using  the  program  improved  at  twice  the  rate  of   non-­‐treatment  group   •  DIBELS  raw  score  effect  size  improvement  of  users  >.8  (sta:s:cally  significant)   vs.  .2  (sta:s:cally  insignificant)  for  non-­‐treatment  group     •  Reading  comprehension  score  for  treatment  group  improved  at  almost  twice   :mes  the  rate  of  the  non-­‐treatment  group     •  A  research  study  funded  by  the  W.K.  Kellogg  Founda:on  showed  significant   improvement  of  cogni:ve  skills  in  clinical  (FAS  impaired)  children  vs.  control   and  alterna:vely  treated  groups     13
  14. 14. Feedback  From  Students   14
  15. 15. Feedback  From  Educators  Teacher:   •  “They  always  ask  for  SkateKids  first.”  Literacy  Leader:   •  “The  kids  here  love  it!!!    Thats  all  Ive  heard...have  you  seen  the      new  SkateKids???    Its  really  cool!!!”  Principal:   •  “If  I  let  them,  they  would  do  nothing  else!”  Literacy  Leader:   •  “We  have  opened  the  lab  @7:30  a.m.  for  SkateKids.  I  sent  home        a  permission  le]er  for  our  2nd  through  5th  grade  students…        and  I  had  approximately  120  le]ers  returned  to  me...        I  created  a  scheduling  nightmare!!!”   15

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