Scil library instruction 101 assessment breakout

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  • Introduce my background and experience
  • This statement about learning is important to my constructivist assumptions about the ways that learners make meaning based on their prior experience and their goals. We don’t know what students will get from being in our classes, but we are responsible for creating a situation that makes it more likely that students will learn the things they want to learn.
  • Classroom assessment is teacher-directed: meaning that the librarian decides what to assess, how to assess, and how to respond to the information gained through the assessment and the librarian is not obliged to share the results of the assessment with anyone outside the classroom.
  • Abbreviate elements of your lesson when you see that students get it alreadyWhen you dedicate extra time to a topic that students are struggling with, using methods that engage students in making meaning (i.e., don’t just lecture more, have students do something)If you’re not comfortable changing something about your lesson, think twice about assessing it during the session since students who’ve shown you they don’t understand might be frustrated if you don’t respond. Then why do you do a lesson plan? Because the lesson plan gives you time to think about
  • Indirect assessment can help you interpret your direct assessment results. For example, if you do a survey of students’ interest in the topic of the class that’s an indirect assessment. If you find out that many students were not interested in the class and then you see that your direct assessment when you had them try to evaluate an article or select a database had poor results, you could use your indirect assessment to help explain why students’ demonstrated learning may have been low because they didn’t care about the class.
  • Abbreviate elements of your lesson when you see that students get it alreadyWhen you dedicate extra time to a topic that students are struggling with, using methods that engage students in making meaning (i.e., don’t just lecture more, have students do something)If you’re not comfortable changing something about your lesson, think twice about assessing it during the session since students who’ve shown you they don’t understand might be frustrated if you don’t respond. Then why do you do a lesson plan? Because the lesson plan gives you time to think about
  • Design a lean plan = classroom assessments take time, so don’t think you can “cover everything” and still assess. Always plan that assessments will take longer to give and to debrief than you think they will.
  • Only using techniques that feel good to you should keep assessment from feeling like a chore.
  • Scil library instruction 101 assessment breakout

    1. 1. CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT April Cunningham Palomar College
    2. 2. HERE’S HOW I PREPARED Assumptions: I believe… Goals: I want to… Our job is to create a situation where ―students learn more effectively and efficiently than they could on their own‖ (Angelo & Cross, 1994). Make it clear that assessment is doable. You may not have done much teaching yet, but you think it’s an important part of librarians’ work. You want practical advice. Inspire you to build assessment into every instruction session. Suggest the connection between the classroom assessment we do and the accountability movement that surrounds our work. Show more assessment methods than any sane person would use during a session.
    3. 3. ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING ―Do the consequences of my actions measure up to the educational principles and values that motivate my work?‖ Mary McAteer Action Research in Education 2013 Classroom assessment is librarian-directed: •The librarian decides what to assess, how to assess, and how to respond to the information gained through the assessment. •The librarian is not obliged to share the results of the assessment with anyone outside the classroom.
    4. 4. HOW COMFORTABLE ARE YOU WITH ASSESSMENT? 1. Mark your sticky note so that you will recognize it later. 2. Place your sticky note on the line based on how comfortable you are with assessment.
    5. 5. TELL ME WHAT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR Go to the LibGuide for this session and complete the polls to indicate how much you value each of the elements that I have planned. http://palomar.libguides.com/LibraryInstruction101
    6. 6. DEBRIEF – THINK, THEN SHARE WITH A NEIGHBOR What was it like to have to move around the space to put up your sticky? What was it like to have to rank the topics for this session? Would you use either of these techniques in your classes?
    7. 7. ARE THESE GOOD PRINCIPLES FOR ASSESSMENT? 1. Fill out the Prior Knowledge Check. 2. Use your colored 3x5 cards to show if you agreed, disagreed, or you weren’t sure about the items as we go down the list.
    8. 8. APRIL’S PRINCIPLES OF ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING •Assess the learning you care about even if it’s tricky to do it. •Collect data only about things you’re able and willing to change. •Collect only as much data as you’re going to be able to analyze. •Gathering evidence about why you’re getting the results you’re getting is as important as the results themselves.
    9. 9. HOW DO YOU SAY…? 1. Select one of the principles of assessment for learning. 2. Paraphrase the principle you chose in order to explain the concept to someone who hates hearing about assessment. 3. Record your statement in the LibGuide by leaving a comment.
    10. 10. DEBRIEF – THINK, THEN SHARE WITH A NEIGHBOR Was previewing a version of the principles before the discussion more helpful for your learning or was paraphrasing a principle after the discussion more helpful? What do you think the facilitator learned from your responses?
    11. 11. 2 REASONS FOR ASSESSMENT Formative Assessment Summative Assessment Occurs throughout the instruction session. Occurs after instruction is completed. Can result in giving students a grade. Is intended to help students manage their learning and help the instructor react to students’ needs. Can be informal (like asking students to raise their hands or just looking at their faces) or formal (like asking students to complete a survey or write answers to questions). Is intended to evaluate the outcome of the instruction and judge students’ proficiency. Is formal.
    12. 12. USING FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT •Cut down a lesson when students already get the concept. •When you add content, use methods that get students to make meaning (i.e., don’t just lecture more, have students do something). •Only do a formative assessment if you’re willing/able to change your plans at least a little. •Write a lesson plan before you teach and build your assessments into it.
    13. 13. WHAT DO YOU KNOW? 1. Open the quiz in your LibGuide or go directly to http://tinyurl.com/LI101Assessment 2. Answer these questions about summative and formative assessments.
    14. 14. 2 WAYS OF ASSESSING Direct Assessment Indirect Assessment Requires students to demonstrate their learning. Allows students or instructors to selfreport student learning. May be considered more valid than indirect assessment as evidence of student learning. Can be used to add affective or other qualitative data to help with interpreting direct assessment results. If you’re short on time, focus on designing direct assessment of your most important learning outcome.
    15. 15. WHAT HAVE WE DONE? 1. Find on your handout the list of assessments we’ve done so far. 2. Mark whether each assessment we’ve done was direct, indirect, or if you don’t know. 3. Be prepared to discuss your answers.
    16. 16. THE CONTEXT FOR OUR ASSESSMENTS •ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Report •ACRL Standards for Higher Education •AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner •AAC&U Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education Rubrics •Lumina Foundation Degree Qualifications Profile •National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment
    17. 17. WHAT DO YOU KNOW? Match the name of the accountability initiative with its description.
    18. 18. RESOURCES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENTS •Skip Downing’s On Course curriculum •Classroom Assessment Techniques by Angelo & Cross • Teaching Goals Inventory
    19. 19. TO AVOID PITFALLS… •Design a lean plan. •Start assessment activities from the beginning of the session to get students comfortable and explain what you’re doing and why. •Consider your audience—Will they like to reflect or will they just want to move forward? Will they feel comfortable sharing their answers out loud or in writing or with a partner or to the whole class?
    20. 20. TO AVOID PITFALLS… (CONT’D) •Remember that not every style will work for every learner, so try using more than one type of assessment if you’re doing multiple assessments during a session. •Only use an assessment after you’ve tried it out on yourself or on a colleague. •Only use techniques that feel right to you.
    21. 21. WHAT WILL YOU DO? 1. Look at the 6 tips for avoiding pitfalls. Which of these is going to be most important for you to remember? Rank them, #1-6. 2. Then gather with others who chose the same tip as their #1. 3. Be prepared to explain to the group why you think your #1 so important.
    22. 22. WRAPPING UP 1. Consider moving your sticky if your comfort with assessment has changed. 2. Select one of these ways to leave me your thoughts: 1. Critical Incident Questionnaire 2. Minute Paper 3. Muddiest Point (write it on a 3x5 card w/ your contact info if you want me to contact you with more information)
    23. 23. SET SOME GOALS FOR YOUR LEARNING 1. Go to the LibGuide for this workshop: link. 2. Take two minutes to think about the following questions: 1. What do you already do well regarding classroom assessment? 2. What would you like to improve about your classroom assessment abilities? 3. Use the comments link in the LibGuide to record your responses in 3 minutes or less. You can use Anonymous instead of your name if you wish.
    24. 24. WHAT WOULD YOU DO? 1. Look at the outcomes you wrote in your earlier session. 2. Based on what you now know about formative and summative assessment, group your outcomes into the ones you’d want to assess during the session and the ones you’d assess at the end. 3. Record your answers as a LibGuide comment.

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