Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Loading in …3
×
1 of 19

English Language Survival Course

1

Share

Download to read offline

This English Survival Course proposal is intended for the large and growing Arabic community in Dearborn, Michigan. Feel free to adapt and use as needed.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

English Language Survival Course

  1. 1. December 8, 2017 ENGLISH LANGUAGE SURVIVAL COURSE PROGRAM OUTLINE NEEDS ANALYSIS A need exists in the Dearborn community for an ESOL bridge program forindividuals entering the USA on a J-1,K-1 or EB-1,2,3,4, or 5 Visa. This includes students, short- term scholars, business trainees, relatives of citizens, teachers, professors and research scholars, specialists, international visitors, government visitors, camp counselors, au pairs, fiances, skilled workers,foreign nationals of extraordinary ability, outstanding professors and researchers, religious workersand even investors. There may also be applications forrefugees. The program is an eight-week language orientation course, focused on language and culture survival skills. Dearborn has been thrown into conflictin recent years, powered by fear, ideology and identity politics. When I lookat Dearborn, I do not feel fear. I see concern and frustration in the hearts of the children, young men and women, young families and elderly who have risked everything for a new life in America, only to be met with hostility by people whose forefathers came to America forthe exact same reasons not so long ago. A need exists tobring their dreams closer to reality. Dearborn is home tothe biggest mosque in the USA. The greatest number of Islamic citizens from the Middle East are Lebanese, although many other Middle Eastern countries are well represented. This community touches my heart because of the poor welcomethey have received from other Americans. INITIAL PROGRAM PREPARATION SURVEY METHOD The U.S. Census Bureau provides accurate data regarding the nationalities and ethnic backgrounds of residents in the USA. Short-term visa holders such as those mentioned above are scattered across the country. In this case, I have tentatively chosen Dearborn, Michigan as the location. This is because Dearborn holds the highest population of Arabic-speaking people in the United States. These are people who need basic English survival skills, such as finding an apartment, going shopping, asking fordirections, creating a resume, competing fora job outside of the Arabic community and building friends in their communities whose native language is English. Dearborn has 94,444 residents, according to 2016 US Census Bureau data. 49.0% speak a language other than English in the home (predominantly Arabic). This means that
  2. 2. 2 46,277 do not speak English in the home. 80.3% have at least a high school education, meaning that 37,161 residents are educated yetdo not speak English in the home. 29.1% live at or below the poverty line, meaning that many are educated but unemployed. LEVELING AND ASSESSMENT In Islamic life, everything is divided into a Singles section and a Family Section. Restaurants, shops, public spaces of all kinds, even McDonald’s and Starbucks are divided this way. If this course is targeted toward this group, it should be no different. This allows us to tailor the course material, curriculum and even times of day to suit each group. It will also make ladies more comfortable,especially those with children. It will make single men more comfortableas well. There are almost no absolute beginners in the Middle East, because they are taught English in school. People in the Middle East also have constant 24/7 exposure to American music, movies, television and fast food menus. Yes, American culture is everywherein the Middle East, and getting stronger. That said, pre-intermediate is the right level forthose learners whohave had casual, extended exposure to pop culture and Friends English, but have never learned nor taken an integrated approach to learning the fourskills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). The Singles Program is for those who fit the largest category of learners whobegan their English language training, got to a place where they couldget a job and get around, so they stopped. Or, they have kept trying to learn but have hit that Intermediate plateau whichhits nearly every ELL,including my ownwifeCynthia. Helping learners beyond this plateau can make the differencebetween their successful assimilation into English-speaking culture and retreating to their L1. An initial assessment test will be administered, as well as a speaking test, to find each student’s level. An initial assessment such as this one will need to be administered to determine the suitability and level of the candidate. https://www.elpac.org/s/pdf/ELPAC_Grades_9-10_Practice_Test_2018.pdf . Assessment Questions Before determining whichtest will be appropriate, several questions need to be asked: i. Have you had any formal English training? If so, what and where? ii. How long do you intend to be in the USA? iii. What do you intend to get from this training? iv. What are youplans for English for yourlife? v. What percentage of your day is spent in English? vi. What percentage of your day would youlike to spend in English? vii. Have you ever been denied employment because of your English? viii.Whichlanguage is spoken in yourhome?
  3. 3. 3 MISSION To welcomeimmigrants with open arms through practicalEnglish education. To equip learners with tools needed to be successful in their new home country. FEES Each8-week course is $795. Grant and scholarship funding willbe sought from The Ford Family Foundation, a Dearborn not forprofit corporation (http://www.tfff.org/) LOCATION The Family Program will be held at Henry Ford Centennial Library, 16301 Michigan Avenue, Dearborn, Michigan Phone: +1-313-943-2330. The Singles Program willbe held at Ford Motor Company Conference & EventCenter, 1151 Village Rd, Dearborn, Michigan 48124 Phone +1-313-621-2900 PUBLICITY Social Media willbe the backbone of our publicity efforts, targeting professionals and visa holders as mentioned above. Directmarketing will also go to key employers and universities in each market. Community Centers, Cultural Centers, mosques, churches, and university neighborhoods must also receive flyersand posters. FINANCIAL BASE An initial grant proposal willbe submitted to and sought fromthe US Customs and Immigration Services, as well as the Small Business Administration and The Ford Family Foundation. Localendowments will also receive an appeal for scholarships. PROGRAM EVALUATION After each course, a feedbackform will be given where learners can interact and help to make the course better. Interpreters will translate into English so that learners can write feedbackand ideas freely in their ownnative languages. An evaluation form foreach learner will also be completed: https://form.jotform.me/73415385325457
  4. 4. 4 BUILDING BRIDGES The community must buy-in to the importance and legitimacy of this program. For this to happen, bridges must be built into the Muslim community in Dearborn. Ideally, this would include a partnership with localmosques, particularly The Islamic Center of America, The American Moslem Society (Masjid Dearborn), and the American Muslim Center. Dearborn is often called the “heart of Shiism”, a sect of Islam. The Islamic Center of America is located at 19500 Ford Road. No program of this type willsucceed in Dearborn withoutits blessing and partnership. FINAL PROGRAM PREPARATION Targets: The daytime target is mothers and children within the Muslim/Arabic community of Dearborn, especially those among the 46,277 people whoin Dearborn who do not speak English in the home. The Singles Program is young Arabic-speaking adults, age 18-34 whoare looking for employment in the L2 worldbut are not yet ready for L2 formal university education, or cannot affordit. Instructors Henry Ford College has a large English language department. Instructors will be sought fromthis storehouse for night school bridge program. The Family Program should be taught ideally by members of the Islamic/Arabic community whowere born in the United States and have English teaching credentials. Instructor Training Screen-O-Matic tutorials will be sent to each teacher in advance to train them on the material. USB curriculum, teacher’s books, lesson plans, workbooksand student books will also be provided to the instructors prior to the commencement of the program. A cultural sensitivity workshop willbe conducted,and ideally led by someone from the Islamic Center of America. Class Time and Term The program will take place during the day from9:00am-2:00pm, withan hour for lunch. Each period will last 50 minutes, built around prayer times. The term willlast 8 weeks, and will be offered twiceper year in the Autumn and Early Spring to coincidewith the availability of mothers when their school-age children are in school. Curriculum and Course Materials The United Kingdom is far ahead of the United States in terms of catering to the needs of Middle Eastern students. Therefore, it willbe recommended to the Islamic Center that Oxford University’s New English File be used as the core curriculafor both
  5. 5. 5 Pre-Intermediate and Upper Intermediate levels. These course books fit wellinto an 8- week cycle. They are not patriotic or politically incorrect. Students from the Middle East who have receivedsome formal English education have usually received it from an “English English” point of view. Toput it another way,children I have met during my time here in the Middle East who speak English, speak it with a British accent. Therefore, it may be easier forthem to assimilate in English using these pre-planted seeds. When I say it will be recommended to the ICA, I mean that they will have to approve the curriculabefore it is used to fully obtain their blessing.
  6. 6. 6 SYLLABUS EIGHT WEEK ENGLISH SURVIVAL COURSE Enrollment begins Autumn 2018 Week Topic Grammar Vocabulary Pre-Intermediate Week One 1A Where are you from? Word order in questions Common verb phrases, spelling and numbers Week Two 1B Charlotte’s Choice Present simple Describing people: appearance and personality Week Three 1C Art and Observation Present continuous Clothes, prepositions of place Week Four 3A Plans and Dreams Be going to (plans and predictions) Getting around airports Week Five 3B Let’s Meet Again Present continuous for future arrangements Verbs+prepositions e.g. arrivein Week Six 4A Parents and Teenagers Present perfect + yet, just,already Housework, makeor do? Week Seven 4B Fashion and Shopping Present perfect or past simple? Shopping Week Eight 5C How much is too much? Quantifiers, too,not enough Health and the body
  7. 7. 7 Fundamental Disciplines Week Pronunciation Speaking Listening Reading Pre- Intermediate Week One Vowelsounds, the alphabet Week Two Final -s / -es Relationships Courtship Who knowsyou better – your mother or your best friend? Week Three /ᵊ/ Describing a picture Visual art (Hockney) Week Four Sentence stress and fast speech 121 Three travel plans Top airports in the world Week Five Sounding friendly Social media Flight details Week Six /j/ and /dᴈ/ Teenage carers Teenagers have annoying habits – but so do their parents Week Seven Sentence stress Spending time Expert advice We’re living faster, but are we living better? Week Eight /ᶺ/, /u:/, /au/, and /e/ Diet and lifestyle Lifestyle radio program Everythingbad is good foryou Source:New English File, Third Edition, Oxford Press Teacher’s Book, ©OxfordUniversity Press (2012)
  8. 8. 8 TESTING Eachweek there willbe a chapter test, incorporating all of the elements described in the syllabus above. There will also be a pre-test, provided by OxfordUniversity New English File, and a final test. Students will this way have an opportunity to see how much they have progressed. Eachstudent will, in addition to their final test result, receive an individualized assessment in the key areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening. SPECIAL TRAINING Learners will also have an opportunity each week to do a field trip witha specific lesson objectivein mind. Individual lessontopics: Learn how to find the right apartment; how to ask forand give directions; how to navigate public transport; how to negotiate; how to create a resume/CV/LinkedIn accountin English; and how to order foodat a restaurant. There will also be a special self-defense course specifically for women, taught by a mixed marital arts champion. PROGRAM EVALUATION Instructor Evaluation of Program:Is the course toonarrow or broad? Why or why not? How can we improve the delivery system? What can we do to enhance the learner experience? What can we do to enhance the trainer experience? What can wedo to enhance the cultural sensitivity of the program? Learner Evaluation of Program and Instructor: An anonymous survey willbe given to each learner, along witha space for them to make comments in their native language. Program Evaluation of Instructor: A detailed observation by a supervisor will be conducted at least once during the eight- week program forevery instructor (see appendix A). CONCLUSION With proper funding, publicity, staffing, pricing, and training, the Dearborn English Survival Course can help to bridge the gap and silence those who wouldmake these immigrants unwelcome. It willinstead welcome them with open arms through practical English education, while equipping them with the tools they need to succeed in their new home country.
  9. 9. 9 APPENDIX A LAB Student SIOP Observation Rubric Student Teacher: School: Date: Observer: Grade / Class: Title of lesson: Well-constructed lesson plan for: Comment: ☐ SDAIE / Academic Instruction in English ☐ ESL ☐ Bilingual Class ☐ Efficient routines ☐ Materials ready ☐ Cognitive engagement of students ☐ Appropriate appearance ☐ Student motivation and involvement ☐ Affective engagement of students ☐ Professional behavior What I saw: Questions: Kudos: Suggestions: Concerns:
  10. 10. 10 Goals for next observation:
  11. 11. 11 The Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) (Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2000; 2004) Observer: Teacher: Date: School: Grade: ESL level: Class: Lesson: Multi-day Single-day (circle one) Directions: Circle the number that best reflects what you observe in a sheltered lesson. You may give a score from 0-4 or NA. Cite under “Comments” specific examples of the behaviors observed. Total Score: % Score: PREPARATION 4 3 2 1 0 NA 1. Clearly defined content objectives for students. Content objectives for students implied. No clearly defined content objectives for students. Comments: 2. Clearly defined language objectives for students. Language objectives for students implied. No clearly defined language objectives for students. Comments: 3. Content concepts appropriate for age and educational background level of students. Content concepts somewhat appropriate for age and educational background level of students. Content concepts inappropriate for age and educational background level of students. Comments: 4. Supplementary materials used to a high degree, making the lesson clear and meaningful (e.g., graphs, models, visuals). Some use of supplementary materials. No use of supplementary materials.
  12. 12. 12 Comments: 5. Adaptation of content (e.g., text, assignment) to all levels of student proficiency. Some adaptation of content to all levels of student proficiency. No significant adaptation of content to all levels of student proficiency. Comments: 6. Meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts (e.g., surveys, letter writing, simulations, constructing models) with language practice opportunities for reading, writing, listening, and / or speaking. Meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts but provide little opportunity for language practice with opportunities for reading, writing, listening, and / or speaking. No meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts with language practice. Comments: BUILDING BACKGROUND 4 3 2 1 0 NA 7. Concepts explicitly linked to students’ background experiences. Concepts loosely linked to students’ background experiences. Concepts not explicitly linked to students’ background experiences. Comments: 8. Links explicitly made between Few links made between past No links made between past
  13. 13. 13 past learning and new concepts. learning and new concepts. learning and new concepts. Comments: 9. Key vocabulary emphasized (e.g., introduced, written, repeated, and highlighted for students to see). Key vocabulary introduced, but not emphasized. Key vocabulary not emphasized. Comments: COMPREHENSIBLE INPUT 4 3 2 1 0 NA 10. Speech appropriate for students’ proficiency level (e.g., slower rate, enunciation, and simple sentence structure for beginners). Speech sometimes inappropriate for students’ proficiency level. Speech inappropriate for students’ proficiency level. Comments: 11. Explanations of academic tasks clear. Explanations of academic tasks somewhat clear. Explanations of academic tasks unclear. Comments: 12. Uses a variety of techniques to make content concepts clear (e.g., modeling, visuals, hands-on Uses some techniques to make content concepts clear. Uses few or no techniques to make content concepts clear.
  14. 14. 14 activities, demonstrations, gestures, body language). Comments: STRATEGIES 13. Provides ample opportunities for students to use strategies (see Glossary). Provides students with inadequate opportunities to use strategies. No opportunity for students to use strategies. Comments: 14. Consistent use of scaffolding techniques throughout lesson, assisting and supporting student understanding, such as think alouds (see Glossary). Occasional use of scaffolding. No use of scaffolding. Comments: 15. Teacher uses a variety of question types including those that promote higher- order thinking skills throughout the lesson (e.g., literal, analytical, and interpretive questions). Teacher infrequently poses questions that promote higher- order thinking skills. Teacher does not pose questions that promote higher-order thinking skills.
  15. 15. 15 Comments: INTERACTION 4 3 2 1 0 NA 16. Frequent opportunities for interactions and discussion between teacher / student and among students, which encourage elaborated responses about lesson concepts. Interactions mostly teacher- dominated with some opportunities for students to talk about or question lesson concepts. Interactions primarily teacher- dominated with no opportunities for students to discuss lesson concepts. Comments: 17. Grouping configurations support language and content objectives of the lesson (see Glossary). Grouping configurations unevenly support the language and content objectives. Grouping configurations do not support the language and content objectives. Comments: 18. Consistently provides sufficient wait time for student responses. Occasionally provides sufficient wait time for student responses. Never provides sufficient wait time for student responses. Comments: 19. Ample opportunities for students to clarify key concepts in L1 Some opportunities for students to clarify No opportunities for students to clarify key concepts in L1.
  16. 16. 16 (see Glossary) as needed with aide, peer, or L1 text. key concepts in L1. Comments: PRACTICE / APPLICATION 4 3 2 1 0 NA 20. Provide hands- on materials and / or manipulatives for students to practice using new content knowledge. Provide few hands-on materials and / or manipulatives for students to practice using new content knowledge. Provide no hands- on materials and / or manipulatives for students to practice using new content knowledge. Comments: 21. Provides activities for students to apply content and language knowledge in the classroom. Provides activities for students to apply either content or language knowledge in the classroom. Provides no activities for students to apply content or language knowledge in the classroom. Comments: 22. Uses activities that integrate all language skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening, and speaking). Uses activities that integrate some language skills. Uses activities that apply only one language skill. Comments: LESSON DELIVERY 4 3 2 1 0 NA
  17. 17. 17 23. Content objectives clearly supported by lesson delivery. Content objectives supported somewhat by lesson delivery. Content objectives not supported by lesson delivery. Comments: 24. Language objectives clearly supported by lesson delivery. Language objectives supported somewhat by lesson delivery. Language objectives not supported by lesson delivery. Comments: 25. Students engaged approximately 90-100% of the period (see Glossary). Students engaged approximately 70% of the period. Students engaged less than 50% of the period. Comments: 26. Pacing of the lesson appropriate to the students’ ability level. Pacing generally appropriate, but at times too fast or too slow. Pacing inappropriate to the students’ ability level. Comments: REVIEW / ASSESSMENT 27. Comprehensive review of key vocabulary. Uneven review of key vocabulary. No review of key vocabulary.
  18. 18. 18 Comments: 28. Comprehensive review of key content concepts. Uneven review of key content concepts. No review of key content concepts. Comments: 29. Regularly provides feedback to students on their output (e.g., language, content, work). Inconsistently provides feedback to students on their output. Provides no feedback to students on their output. Comments: 30. Conducts assessment of student comprehension and learning of all lesson objectives (e.g., spot checking, group response) throughout the lesson (see Glossary). Conducts assessment of student comprehension and learning of some lesson objectives. Conducts no assessment of student comprehension and learning of lesson objectives. Comments: Source: Echevarria, J., Vogt, M.E., & Short, D. (2004). Making content comprehensible for English learners: The SIOP model. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Using the SIOP Model. © 2002. Center for Applied Linguistics. All rights reserved.
  19. 19. 19

×