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The Door & Frame Schedule

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"The Door & Frame Schedule", a training presentation for the professional and technical personnel who prepare architectural construction documents.

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The Door & Frame Schedule

  1. 1. A Discussion of Doors, Door Frames, Glazing and Finish Hardware and how the information is conveyed in Construction Drawings. Refer to Section P of the Todd & Associates Production Manual.
  2. 2. Door Defined <ul><li>A door is an operable panel used to provide access to a building or room through a wall opening. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A door is composed of horizontal frame members called rails and vertical frame members called stiles . Finish hardware should always be installed on a stile, rail or blocking. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The door may have a skin over the frame called the face or face sheet . </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If the spaces, or cores, between the stile and rail frame are filled solid, it is a solid core door . </li></ul><ul><li>If the spaces, or cores, between the stile and rail frame are left empty, it is a hollow core door . </li></ul><ul><li>If the stiles and rails are left exposed and finished, with finished panels in the spaces between them, it is a stile & rail door . </li></ul>
  3. 3. Door Operation <ul><li>The most common door operation is a swinging door that swings on hinges. </li></ul><ul><li>A bi-fold door operates by both sliding along a track and folding by hinged connections. </li></ul><ul><li>A by-pass sliding door slides in a track beside another door that it by-passes. </li></ul><ul><li>A pocket sliding door slides along a track into a pocket in a wall cavity. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Frame Defined <ul><li>A frame is an assembly of members, designed to receive a door or glazing, installed in a wall opening. The exposed vertical sides of the members are faces . Their sizes are called face widths . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The top, horizontal member is the head </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The bottom, horizontal member is the sill </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The side, vertical members are the jambs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intermediate members are mullions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Permanent stops are attached to, or formed into, the frame members to position the door or glazing in the frame. Removable stops are added to secure the glazing against the permanent stops and yet allow for replacement. </li></ul><ul><li>Bumpers, or silencers, are used on door stops to cushion the door impact when it closes against the stop, usually three per door. </li></ul><ul><li>Jamb Anchors are used to secure the frame to the adjacent wall construction, normally one for every 2’-0” of jamb height. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Door & Frame Nomenclature Rails are horizontal And include Top, Cross, Lock & Bottom Rails Stiles are vertical and Include Hinge and Lock Stiles Panels are the spaces Between the Stiles and Rails. This is a “6-Panel” Door. The head is the top, Horizontal frame member The jambs are the side, Vertical frame members
  6. 6. Opening Defined <ul><li>The opening is the term applied to the overall opening that contains the door(s) and/or frame. </li></ul>Transom Side Lite Doors Frame Sill Jambs Head Mullion
  7. 7. Opening Information in Construction Documents <ul><li>Our documentation philosophy is to show information once and in the right place . </li></ul><ul><li>The entry drawing into a set of CD’s is the floor plan . Show what we can here, and what we can’t, we reference to another drawing, the Door & Frame Schedule . </li></ul>
  8. 8. Door Information on Floor Plan <ul><li>On the Floor Plan , show door: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Swing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opening Number </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The opening number will guide the reader into the appropriate information row in the Door & Frame Schedule. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Door & Frame Schedule <ul><li>Door information that cannot be easily shown on the Floor Plan is shown in the Door & Frame Schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>A Door & Frame Schedule is really an Openings Schedule because it schedules not just doors, but frames, glazing, and finish hardware, everything in the opening. </li></ul><ul><li>The Schedule also provides sizes, types (configurations), materials, fire resistance ratings and other information. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Window & Louver Schedule <ul><li>Exterior windows & louvers are shown in a Window & Louver Schedule that is separate from the Door & Frame Schedule. Refer to Section Q of the Todd & Associates Production Manual. </li></ul><ul><li>Patio (and similar) Doors that are of the same construction and manufacturer as the exterior windows are normally described in the Window & Louver Schedule, but still referenced in the Door & Frame Schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>Borrowed Lites (interior windows) and louver doors are shown in the Door & Frame Schedule. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Opening Number <ul><li>We have two options for assigning opening numbers, based on the Door & Frame Schedule to be used: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Standard Door & Frame Schedule , where every opening will have an individual, unique number </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Optional Door Type Schedule , where identical openings are assigned the same number to reduce the size of the Door & Frame Schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Each opening number will be assigned to a horizontal row of information in the Door & Frame Schedule. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Standard Door & Frame Schedule <ul><li>Openings are numbered based on the number of the room that they serve. Every opening in the project has a unique number assigned to it. </li></ul><ul><li>Where more than one opening serves the same room, a suffix letter is added to the room number (-A, -B, -C, etc.). </li></ul><ul><li>Only one number is assigned per opening , regardless of how many doors are contained in the opening. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Opening Illustrated One Opening with One Frame and Two Doors (assigned one opening number) Finish hardware Doors Frame
  14. 14. Exceptions <ul><li>Doors that are typically provided as a part of the windows or storefront package may be referenced elsewhere, but should still have an opening number for reference purposes. </li></ul><ul><li>In remodeling projects , existing openings with no work may be undesignated. Those with work (such as door or hardware replacement) must be assigned numbers. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Optional Door Type Schedule <ul><li>Openings are numbered based on the sameness of the doors (same typical size, material, type, glazing, louvers, frame, finish hardware and fire resistance rating). </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: typical apartment entry door, typical bathroom door, typical laundry door, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Other than this, the Schedule is the same as the Standard Door & Frame Schedule. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Door Sizes <ul><li>Whenever possible, standard door sizes should be used. </li></ul><ul><li>In masonry construction , size doors & frames to fit masonry openings. A 3’-0” wide door works in a 3’-4” wide M.O., allowing for 2” face width jambs. A 7’-0” high door works in a 7’-4” high M.O. with a 4” head. </li></ul><ul><li>Swing Door Widths are generally in two-inch increments (2’-0”, 2’-2”, 2’-4”, 2’-6”, 2’-8”, 2’-10”, 3’-0”) – Beware of Accessibility! </li></ul><ul><li>Bi-Fold & Bypass Door Widths are generally in 1’-0” increments and include all doors in the opening. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard heights are 6’-8”, 6’-10” & 7’-0” </li></ul><ul><li>Standard thicknesses are 1-3/4” & 1-3/8” </li></ul><ul><li>A standard commercial door is 3’-0” wide X 7’-0” high X 1-3/4” thick. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Common Door Materials <ul><li>Hollow Metal, a steel door (HM) </li></ul><ul><li>Aluminum (AL) </li></ul><ul><li>Hollow Core Wood (HCWD) </li></ul><ul><li>Solid Core Wood (SCWD) </li></ul><ul><li>Stile & Rail Wood (SRWD) </li></ul><ul><li>Clad Wood Doors (CLWD) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Steel, vinyl, aluminum or hardboard clad </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mirror (MIR) </li></ul><ul><li>Glass (GL) </li></ul><ul><li>Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF) </li></ul>SRWD
  18. 18. Door Materials Abbreviations <ul><li>Door materials are scheduled using standard abbreviations such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HM = Hollow Metal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AL = Aluminum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STL = Steel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FGL = Fiberglass </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FRP = Fiberglass Reinforced Polyester </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>GL = Glass </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IG = Insulating Glass </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>WD = Wood </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HCWD = Hollow Core Wood </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SCWD = Solid Core Wood </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SRWD = Stile & Rail Wood </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CLWD = Clad Wood </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SFGL = Safety Glass </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MIR = Mirror </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MDF = Medium Density Fiberboard </li></ul></ul>FRP Doors
  19. 19. Door Types <ul><li>Door types are the generic form or configuration of the door. They are scheduled by nomenclature that references the reader to illustrations of the types. </li></ul><ul><li>Door type illustrations are elevations, usually drawn at ¼” scale, that show door cut-outs such as vision lites and louvers, and door surface designs such as molded or embossed panels. </li></ul><ul><li>Sizes and materials have nothing to do with door types. They are scheduled separately in the Door & Frame Schedule. </li></ul>FG (full glass)
  20. 20. Door Types per SDI
  21. 21. Example Door Types Steelcraft L-Series
  22. 22. Example Door Types Steelcraft CE-Series (Embossed Panels)
  23. 23. Glazing Type <ul><li>Glazing: a generic term used to describe infill materials such as glass, panels, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Glazing types are scheduled using standard abbreviations such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Glass (GL): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>IG = Insulating Glass (sealed double-pane) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>SFGL = Safety Glass (tempered or laminated) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>FRGL = Fire resistance rated glass (“FireLite”) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>WG = Wired Glass </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Panels (PNL): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MTL = Metal </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>FRP = Fiberglass Reinforced Polyester </li></ul></ul></ul>Glass Panel
  24. 24. Typical Glazing Applications Transom Glass Sidelite Glass Door Glass Sidelite Panel
  25. 25. Glazing Material Examples IG (Insulating Glass) FRP (Fiberglass Reinforced Polyester Panel)
  26. 26. Glazed Entrance Example
  27. 27. Door Louvers <ul><li>Louvers provide for ventilation through a door. Sometimes, in lieu of a louver, doors are undercut for air circulation. </li></ul><ul><li>Caution! Fire-resistance rated doors cannot have louvers in them unless they are equipped with fire dampers. Also, any undercut is limited. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide the louver size (width and height) in the Door Schedule if other than standard . </li></ul>Stile Rail Louver Blades 2-Louver Door
  28. 28. Louver Door Examples Masonite MDF Door, Louver Over Panel Masonite Wood Door, 2-Louver Kuhaimi Hollow Metal Bi-Fold Doors, 2-Louver Anemostat Metal Louver Insert in Wood Door
  29. 29. Borrowed Lites <ul><li>Borrowed Lites are glazed openings in a wall that are not connected to a door. </li></ul><ul><li>They are different from side and transom lites because there is no door in the frame. </li></ul><ul><li>They are different from windows because they are not exposed to the exterior and are normally constructed similar to interior door openings. </li></ul><ul><li>They are usually scheduled in the Door & Frame Schedule rather than the Window Schedule. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Borrowed Lite Frame Type Examples Amweld Borrowed Lites Vertical & horizontal dimensions are provided
  31. 31. Borrowed Lite Examples
  32. 32. Frames <ul><li>Frames are scheduled in the Door & Frame Schedule in the columns following those for the door(s). </li></ul><ul><li>Frame information is similar to that for doors, including material and type . </li></ul><ul><li>Added to frame information are references to head, jamb and sill details that will illustrate the size and profile of the frame members. </li></ul>
  33. 33. Frame Defined (again) <ul><li>A frame is an assembly of members, designed to receive a door or glazing, installed in a wall opening. The exposed vertical sides of the members are faces . Their sizes are called face widths . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The top, horizontal member is the head </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The bottom, horizontal member is the sill </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The side, vertical members are the jambs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intermediate members are mullions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Permanent stops are attached to, or formed into, the frame members to position the door or glazing in the frame. Removable stops are added to secure the glazing against the permanent stops and yet allow for replacement. </li></ul><ul><li>Bumpers, or silencers, are used on door stops to cushion the door impact when it closes against the stop, usually three per door. </li></ul><ul><li>Jamb Anchors are used to secure the frame (jambs) to the adjacent wall construction, normally one for every 2’-0” of jamb height. A base anchor is used at the bottom of each jamb to secure the bottoms of the jambs to the floor construction. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Frame Material <ul><li>Frame materials are scheduled using standard abbreviations such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HM = Hollow Metal (a light gauge steel frame, ranging from 18 to 12 gauge) – normally the frame is one gauge stronger than the faces of the HM door installed in it (gauges are in increments of 2). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AL = Aluminum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>WD = Wood (usually custom field carpentry assembled, unless provided with a pre-hung door assembly) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>STL = Steel (usually steel shapes, such as at a commercial overhead door opening) </li></ul></ul>
  35. 35. Frame Types <ul><li>Frame types are the generic form or configuration of the frame. They are scheduled by nomenclature that references the reader to illustrations of the types. </li></ul><ul><li>Frame type illustrations show an elevation of the frame, usually at ¼” scale, showing all head, jamb & sill members. Atypical face widths of members (such as 4” HM heads or 8” sills) can be dimensioned here. </li></ul><ul><li>Glazed frame openings , such as sidelites and transoms, are dimensioned in the frame elevations. The materials in these openings are also labeled (by abbreviation) in the elevations. </li></ul><ul><li>The frame materials and door opening dimensions have nothing to do with frame types. These are scheduled separately in the Door & Frame Schedule. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Frame Types Examples Metropolitan Door Industries HM Frames Provide dimensions for all glazed openings (sidelites, BL’s & transoms) Frame opening Dimensions are to Frame, not including Stops. For HM frames, 2” face width is Typical . All other Face widths are Atypical.
  37. 37. Typical Frame Details <ul><li>Frame details are referenced by detail number to architectural details that show the frame profile and its installation in the wall, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Head : The top horizontal member </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jambs : The side vertical members </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hinge Jamb: side where door is hinged </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Strike Jamb: side where door latches </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sill : The bottom horizontal member </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mullions : Intermediate members between doors and/or glazed panels (not abutting walls) may also be detailed if atypical. </li></ul></ul>
  38. 38. HM Frame Profile Terminology
  39. 39. HM Frame Profiles Depth Dimension Rabbet (door thickness) 1-3/4” 0r 1-3/8” typical Face Width (2” standard) Throat Flush (Masonry) Type Profile 3-sided frames provided set-up & welded (SUA) or knock down (KD) Drywall Type Profile 3-sided frames provided knock down (KD) Backbend Backbend Backbend Return (on Drywall (DW) or Multi-Use (MU) profiles Soffit Stop (5/8” standard)
  40. 40. HM Flush Frame Jamb Anchors
  41. 41. Architectural Head Details <ul><li>The head detail positions the frame head in the wall construction , showing the frame profile and all abutting and integrated materials, such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Headers and drywall, including the header size and the drywall thickness, casing, insulation, sheathing, flashing and exterior finishes, including thicknesses, as applicable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Masonry, lintels or beams, sealant, flashing and weeps, insulation and additional finishes, including thicknesses, as applicable </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Align the head detail vertically with the corresponding jamb and sill details below </li></ul>
  42. 42. Architectural Jamb Details <ul><li>The jamb detail positions the frame jambs in the wall construction , showing the frame profile, anchors and all abutting and integrated materials, such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Double studs and drywall, including the studs size and the drywall thickness, casing, insulation, sheathing & exterior finishes, including thicknesses, as applicable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Masonry (showing thickness & bullnose edges as applicable), sealant, grout, insulation and additional finishes, including thicknesses, as applicable </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Align the jamb detail vertically with the corresponding head detail above and sill detail below </li></ul>
  43. 43. Architectural Sill Details <ul><li>The sill detail positions the frame in the wall construction , showing the frame profile, anchors and all abutting and integrated materials, such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Double sill plates and drywall, including the plates size and the drywall thickness, stools, casing, insulation, sheathing and exterior finishes, including thicknesses, as applicable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Masonry (showing thickness & bullnose edges as applicable), sealant and grout, stools, insulation, flashing and additional finishes (and thicknesses) as applicable. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Align the sill detail vertically with the corresponding jamb and head details above </li></ul>
  44. 44. Fire Rating of Opening Assembly <ul><li>Fire-resistance rated opening assemblies are identified in the Schedule by hourly ratings, such as ¾HR, 1HR, 1-1/2HR and 2HR, or minutes rating, such as 20MIN. This sets the requirement for all items (doors, frame, glazing & finish hardware) contained within the opening assembly. </li></ul><ul><li>The opening rating is normally a little less than the rating of the wall it is in. For example, a 3/4HR opening is normally permitted in a 1HR wall; a 1-1/2HR opening is normally permitted in a 2HR wall. </li></ul><ul><li>All fire-resistance rated doors must be positive latching and provided with a closer . </li></ul><ul><li>Wired glass or “Fire Lite” (for a clear appearance) are normally used for glass in fire-resistance rated glass glazed openings. </li></ul>
  45. 45. Finish Hardware <ul><li>Each door in the project will require a finish hardware set that includes such common items (and others as applicable) as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Butt Hinges (normally 1-1/2 pair, or 3 per door) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Latchset (passage, lock, privacy, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stop (wall, floor, hinge or overhead) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Closer (required on fire-resistance rated doors ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Threshold, sweep and weatherstripping (for exterior doors) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The “set” is assigned by a hardware (HW) set number such as HW-1, HW-2, etc.) that is entered into the Schedule in the row for the door opening that it is assigned to. The same set may apply to more than one door opening. </li></ul><ul><li>Each HW “set” will include a unique (compared to the other HW sets) collection of finish hardware items to completely equip the door that it is assigned to. </li></ul>
  46. 46. Example Hardware Set 1 <ul><li>An example of a generic, function-based hardware set: </li></ul><ul><li>HW-1 </li></ul><ul><li>1-1/2 PR EA Butt Hinges </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Privacy Set </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Closer </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Wall Stop </li></ul>
  47. 47. Example Hardware Set 2 <ul><li>Another example of a generic, function-based hardware set: </li></ul><ul><li>HW-2 </li></ul><ul><li>1-1/2 PR EA Butt Hinges, BB, NRP </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Exit Device w/ Outside Grip Handle Latch Trim </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Closer </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Kickplate </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Threshold </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Sweep </li></ul><ul><li>1 EA Weatherstipping </li></ul>
  48. 48. Remarks <ul><li>For additional information that is needed, but the Schedule has no place to provide it, we use the Remarks column. Every type of schedule should have a remarks column as the backup way to convey information not provided for in the Schedule. </li></ul><ul><li>Remarks are often used to provide information that is unique to a specific door, atypical or unusual in nature. They may also be used to reference the reader to another location in the Construction Documents. </li></ul><ul><li>Remarks are referenced by numbers to a list or Legend of Remarks, included near to the Schedule, where the remarks are written out. </li></ul>
  49. 49. General Notes <ul><li>General Notes are used to instruct the reader how to read the Schedule and in what the meanings of specific indications and/or references are that are used in the Schedule. A Legend of Abbreviations must also be provided. </li></ul><ul><li>General Notes are also used to convey general information that applies to all or many conditions in the project and to save us from overly repetitious schedule entries. They are used for this purpose more extensively on projects without written specifications. </li></ul><ul><li>Some general information examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All HM frames in masonry or concrete walls shall be provided set-up & welded (SUA) and shall be grouted solid in place. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All HM frame face widths are 2”, unless noted otherwise. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All glass in exterior openings shall be insulating glass. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Safety glass may be tempered or laminated as permitted by the applicable code provisions. </li></ul></ul>
  50. 50. Questions & Discussion <ul><li>Doors </li></ul><ul><li>Frames </li></ul><ul><li>Openings </li></ul><ul><li>The Door & Frame Schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Glazing </li></ul><ul><li>Louvers </li></ul><ul><li>Borrowed Lites </li></ul><ul><li>Details </li></ul><ul><li>Fire Resistance Ratings </li></ul><ul><li>Finish Hardware </li></ul><ul><li>Remarks, General Notes </li></ul>
  51. 51. References <ul><li>www.wdma.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.awinet.org </li></ul><ul><li>www.wicnet.org </li></ul><ul><li>www.masonite.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.steelcraft.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.steeldoor.org (SDI) </li></ul><ul><li>www.naamm.org/hmma/literature.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>www.buildershardware.com (BHMA) </li></ul><ul><li>www.glasswebsite.com (GANA) </li></ul><ul><li>www.glass.org (NGA) </li></ul>
  52. 52. A Discussion of Doors, Door Frames, Glazing and Finish Hardware and how the information is conveyed in Construction Drawings. Refer to Section P of the Todd & Associates Production Manual.

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