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Realising UNESCO’s vision
of lifelong learning
Dra. Madhu Singh
Unesco Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) in Hamburg,
G...
Structure
1. UIL’s approach to sharing learning across
countries;
2. Conceptual framework of lifelong learning;
3. UIL’s p...
1. “Policy dialogue” and “bench-learning”
 International benchmarking of a few areas of strategic
importance;
 Common po...
1. Using empirical evidence to obtain insights on
how countries are realising lifelong learning
Linking Recognition Pract...
1. Using empirical evidence and insights on how
countries are realising lifelong learning
 Global Inventory of National Q...
Global trends: Li
2. Shaping UNESCO’s Vision of lifelong learning
 The report Learning to Be commissioned by UNESCO
in 19...
2. “Lifelong education” and “lifelong learning”
 Lifelong education implies a greater emphasis on
learning within formal ...
2. Lifelong learning is an organising principle,
an integrative concept
Lifelong learning has become an organising
princi...
2. Lifelong learning is an organising principle,
an integrative concept
It entails the ability to work across different
s...
2. Implementation of lifelong learning from a
multi-level perspective
Macro-level : NQFs can be seen as a response
to a mo...
3. UIL’s policy framework for strengthening lifelong
learning
 Improving progression pathways;
 Strengthening foundation...
3. UIL’s policy framework for strengthening
lifelong learning





Delivery of assessment, validation and accreditation...
4. Lessons learned
 NQFs can accelerate developments in lifelong
learning
 NQFs facilitate interfaces between education
...
5. Challenges
 Tension between quality and goals of
broadening access;
 Governments need to understand that
the shift to...
5. Challenges

 Lifelong learning needs to go beyond
skills and knowledge to include personal
attributes like honesty and...
5. Challenges
 Efforts are needed to overcome poor
quality of non-formal education;
 The professional development of
tra...
Concluding statement

The concept of lifelong learning as
an organising principle and
integrative approach to personal,
so...
Muchas gracias
Dra Madhu Singh
UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning
Feldbrunnenstr. 58
20148 Hamburg
Germany

m.singh@un...
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Realising UNESCO’s vision of lifelong learning

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Conferencia presentada por Madhu Singh

Congreso Aprendizaje permanente: un desafío y una oportunidad para la educación superior 5 y 6 de noviembre 2013 – Universidad Católica de Temuco

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Realising UNESCO’s vision of lifelong learning

  1. 1. Realising UNESCO’s vision of lifelong learning Dra. Madhu Singh Unesco Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) in Hamburg, Germany Congreso Internacional ALFA TRALL Apprendizaje permanent: un desafio y una oportunidad para la educación superior 5 y 6 noviembre 2013 – Universidad Católica de Temuco Chile
  2. 2. Structure 1. UIL’s approach to sharing learning across countries; 2. Conceptual framework of lifelong learning; 3. UIL’s policy framework for strengthening lifelong learning; 4. Lessons learned; 5. Challenges.
  3. 3. 1. “Policy dialogue” and “bench-learning”  International benchmarking of a few areas of strategic importance;  Common policy framework or criteria;  Using insights from country-specific contexts;  Countries learning from each other.
  4. 4. 1. Using empirical evidence to obtain insights on how countries are realising lifelong learning Linking Recognition Practices to National Qualifications Frameworks – International exchange of experiences and strategies (UIL, 2013); 23 country examples Why Recognition matters: Global perspectives on recognition, validation and accreditation of non-formal and informal learning (UIL, 2013); 24 country examples
  5. 5. 1. Using empirical evidence and insights on how countries are realising lifelong learning  Global Inventory of National Qualifications Frameworks (UIL, 2013); 34 cases  Observatory on Recognition, Validation and Accreditation of Non-formal and Informal Learning; 60 cases  UNESCO Guidelines for the Recognition, Validation and Accreditation of the Outcomes of Non-formal and Informal learning (UIL, 2012).
  6. 6. Global trends: Li 2. Shaping UNESCO’s Vision of lifelong learning  The report Learning to Be commissioned by UNESCO in 1972 (Faure et al., 1972). Embodies fundamental alternatives to the prevailing concepts and structures of education.  The UNESCO’s Delors Report, Learning: The treasure within (Delors et al., 1996). A clear shift emerged from the term ‘lifelong education’ to ‘lifelong learning’, putting the emphasis on learner needs and individual choice.
  7. 7. 2. “Lifelong education” and “lifelong learning”  Lifelong education implies a greater emphasis on learning within formal educational institutions (programmes of adults through distance learning etc.)  Lifelong learning, encompasses all forms of learning.  Lifelong learning pays emphasis to strengthening the foundation for effective learning through the life span.  Lifelong learning entails developing the skills, knowledge and motivation among young people and adults to enable them to be self-directed learners.
  8. 8. 2. Lifelong learning is an organising principle, an integrative concept Lifelong learning has become an organising principle of sector-wide education and training reforms; It entails the notion of human capabilities and the social dimensions of learning; It is an integrated approach to personal, social and economic development; It entails the ability to work across different sectors and policy domains; .
  9. 9. 2. Lifelong learning is an organising principle, an integrative concept It entails the ability to work across different sectors and policy domains; A significant goal of lifelong learning and education should be the development of active citizenship, humanistic values and democratic ideals; The concepts of formal, non-formal and informal learning have become key terms within the lifelong learning approach.
  10. 10. 2. Implementation of lifelong learning from a multi-level perspective Macro-level : NQFs can be seen as a response to a more integrated and inter-linked system of learning pathways; Micro-level: closer action between workplace, individual and education providers; assessment, validation and accreditation practices; personal development and career planning; tailor-made learning; portfolio development; teaching and learning strategies;
  11. 11. 3. UIL’s policy framework for strengthening lifelong learning  Improving progression pathways;  Strengthening foundations of lifelong learning;  The use of NQFs and learning outcomes-based reference points;  Including other areas of human capabilities beyond productive skills;
  12. 12. 3. UIL’s policy framework for strengthening lifelong learning    Delivery of assessment, validation and accreditation of formal, non-formal and informal learning as a core quality issue; Clarifying roles of stakeholders in enhancing lifelong learning; The reorientation of education and training systems and policies towards a diversified and integrated lifelong learning system.
  13. 13. 4. Lessons learned  NQFs can accelerate developments in lifelong learning  NQFs facilitate interfaces between education in formal institutions, non-formal education and learning, and skills development.  The principles of inclusiveness, access and equity represent crucial factors in justifying frameworks;  Lifelong learning involves far more than educational policies alone;
  14. 14. 5. Challenges  Tension between quality and goals of broadening access;  Governments need to understand that the shift to an outcomes-based approach has many implications for assessment, validation and certification and learning and teaching strategies in a lifelong learning system that recognises a diversification of learning paths.
  15. 15. 5. Challenges  Lifelong learning needs to go beyond skills and knowledge to include personal attributes like honesty and creativity; humanistic values, active citizenship and democratic participation;  The challenge is to go from the systemic level to the user and provider level;  Consultation at the bottom levels is necessary.
  16. 16. 5. Challenges  Efforts are needed to overcome poor quality of non-formal education;  The professional development of trainers, teachers, assessors, guiders and counsellors engaged in recognition practices within non-formal education,  Strengthening formal education and training structures (curricula, teaching practices)
  17. 17. Concluding statement The concept of lifelong learning as an organising principle and integrative approach to personal, social and economic development has considerable potential in overcoming these challenges
  18. 18. Muchas gracias Dra Madhu Singh UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning Feldbrunnenstr. 58 20148 Hamburg Germany m.singh@unesco.org

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