Ideas You Can Play With

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What's at the intersection of learning and tangible computing?

What's at the intersection of learning and tangible computing?

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  • 1. ?IdeasYou CanPlay WithPresented By:Stephen P. Anderson@stephenanderson | #lscon
  • 2. ProductStephen P. Strategy aND n Deonsisuglting C Anderson
  • 3. ProductStephen P. Strategy aND n Deonsisuglting C Anderson
  • 4. ProductStephen P. Strategy aND n Deonsisuglting C Anderson
  • 5. 1920-1923…While employed at Kansas City Film Ad CompanyBorrows stop motioncamera from boss, toexperiment w/ handdrawn (cel) animation -creates series of“Laugh-O-Grams” Launches studio: Laugh-O-Gram Films
  • 6. 1923-1927Disney is very successful with the“Alice Comedies,” which bring liveaction into a cartoon.
  • 7. 1928 Experiments with new way of syncing audio with film animation THINK“GET AS LARG E A LOAN AS POSSIBLE. DONT RTHIRTY FIVE HU NDRED ENOUGH TRY FOR MORE OUFUTURE DEPENDS ON FIRST PICTURE THEREFORE AM SNEY.NOT SPARING EXPENSE” WALT DI
  • 8. 1929-1939More than 75 “Silly Symphonies” arecreated as a way to explore differentadvances sound, color, and animation
  • 9. PAINT JARSThe Walt Disney Studios wasthe first to experiment withtechnicolor, which was firstdone in 1932 for "Flowers andTrees".
  • 10. "The Old Mill" was the first cartoon on which Walt used the multiplane camera. This concept art was done by Gustaf Tenggren, ca. 1937.This camera is one of the threeoriginal cameras used to achievedepth in animated films.
  • 11. UNDER WATER CAMERAThe first film to use an underwatercamera was Walts third live actionfilm-20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.
  • 12. “ …the bleeding edge guerilla technology arm of The Walt Disney Company.”“ Were honoring Walt Disneys legacy of innovation by researching novel technologies and deploying them on a global scale.”
  • 13. http://www.disneyresearch.com/project/botanicus-interacticus-interactive-plant-technology/
  • 14. http://www.disneyresearch.com/project/touche-touch-and-gesture-sensing-for-the-real-world/
  • 15. http://www.disneyresearch.com/project/touche-touch-and-gesture-sensing-for-the-real-world/
  • 16. http://www.disneyresearch.com/project/teslatouch/
  • 17. “What’s the application?”
  • 18. Q: Where do new ideas come from?
  • 19. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures.
  • 20. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things
  • 21. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things Learning Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Sense-Making, Education
  • 22. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. ? New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things Learning Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Sense-Making, Education
  • 23. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things Learning Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Sense-Making, Education
  • 24. We learn through...1 is the most relevant, powerful form of self-directed learning learning (70/20/10, experiential learning, etc.) (and well-framed challenges)2 visual imagery aids in comprehension (and recall), reveals patterns and relationships3 conceptual metaphors accelerate comprehension of new ideas through a rich set of cognitive associations (and narratives)4 playful interactions are engaging, personalized, lead to pattern recognition as well as serendipitous accidents and discoveries5 immediate feedback loops allow us to auto-correct and learn from mistakes6 enable us to learn with the whole body embodied cognition (and multi-sensory experiences)7 humor, surprise, delight arouse the brain and are more likely to be recalled later on; amygdala is emotional center & index to memories
  • 25. The jockey offers a piece of sugar to hishorse before jumping into the saddle,the coachman beats his horse that hemay respond to the signs given by thereins; and, yet, neither of these runs sosuperbly as the free horse of the plains.–MARIA MONTESSORI
  • 26. There are NO badges, leaderboards, rewards, levels, missions…
  • 27. There are NO badges, leaderboards, rewards, levels, missions…
  • 28. There are NO badges, leaderboards, rewards, levels, missions…
  • 29. There are NO badges, leaderboards, rewards, levels, missions…
  • 30. There are NO badges, leaderboards, rewards, levels, missions…
  • 31. There are NO badges, leaderboards, rewards, levels, missions…
  • 32. There are NO badges, leaderboards, rewards, levels, missions…
  • 33. There are NO badges, leaderboards, rewards, levels, missions…
  • 34. …we have preparedthe environment andthe materials–MARIA MONTESSORI
  • 35. How can we reframe learningenvironment, using… Challenges Competition Curiosity Cooperation Control Recognition Fantasy Self-Expression
  • 36. We learn through...1 is the most relevant, powerful form of self-directed learning learning (70/20/10, experiential learning, etc.) (and well-framed challenges)2 visual imagery aids in comprehension (and recall), reveals patterns and relationships3 conceptual metaphors accelerate comprehension of new ideas through a rich set of cognitive associations (and narratives)4 playful interactions are engaging, personalized, lead to pattern recognition as well as serendipitous accidents and discoveries5 immediate feedback loops allow us to auto-correct and learn from mistakes6 enable us to learn with the whole body embodied cognition (and multi-sensory experiences)7 humor, surprise, delight arouse the brain and are more likely to be recalled later on; amygdala is emotional center & index to memories
  • 37. !"#$%&%&$()$*+%+($,-$!"#$%&$.+,/$("0$.-1&#%$-2$%"304&$2+5&#&,&%666 ICONIC WORKING LONG-TERM MEMORY MEMORY MEMORY
  • 38. SUBTLE DIFFERENCES ARE SIGNIFICANT.Subtle differences are significant.SHAPE COLOR INTENSITY ICONOGRAPHY ?(COLOR) OPACITY OVERLAYPLACEMENT TEXTURE OVERLAPSIZE ROTATION JOINOUTLINE OR SOLID PERSPECTIVE ASPECT RATIOIF OUTLINE, THICKNESS OF STROKE ETC!
  • 39. SUBTLE DIFFERENCES ARE SIGNIFICANT.Subtle differences are significant.SHAPE COLOR INTENSITY ICONOGRAPHY ?(COLOR) OPACITY OVERLAYPLACEMENT TEXTURE OVERLAPSIZE ROTATION JOINOUTLINE OR SOLID PERSPECTIVE ASPECT RATIOIF OUTLINE, THICKNESS OF STROKE ETC!
  • 40. SUBTLE DIFFERENCES ARE SIGNIFICANT.Subtle differences are significant.SHAPE COLOR INTENSITY ICONOGRAPHY ?(COLOR) OPACITY OVERLAYPLACEMENT TEXTURE OVERLAPSIZE ROTATION JOINOUTLINE OR SOLID PERSPECTIVE ASPECT RATIOIF OUTLINE, THICKNESS OF STROKE ETC!
  • 41. “SMALL DATA” PROBLEMS
  • 42. We learn through...1 is the most relevant, powerful form of self-directed learning learning (70/20/10, experiential learning, etc.) (and well-framed challenges)2 visual imagery aids in comprehension (and recall), reveals patterns and relationships3 conceptual metaphors accelerate comprehension of new ideas through a rich set of cognitive associations (and narratives)4 playful interactions are engaging, personalized, lead to pattern recognition as well as serendipitous accidents and discoveries5 immediate feedback loops allow us to auto-correct and learn from mistakes6 enable us to learn with the whole body embodied cognition (and multi-sensory experiences)7 humor, surprise, delight arouse the brain and are more likely to be recalled later on; amygdala is emotional center & index to memories
  • 43. !"#$%&%&$()$*+%+($,-$!"#$%&$.+,/$("0$.-1&#%$-2$%"304&$2+5&#&,&%666 ICONIC WORKING LONG-TERM MEMORY MEMORY MEMORY 7(,&.0"-4$8&0-.9(#%$ -+2$+$"2&#%0-2+:6
  • 44. The Blue Sky of BenefitsFinally, something good! Co-insurance This is usually a percentage amount that is the Co-payments insureds responsibility. A common co-insurance split is 80/20. This means that the insurance The co-payment is a fixed amount that company will pay 80% of the procedure and the the insured is required to pay at the time insured is required to pay the other 20%. of service. It is usually required for basic doctor visits and when purchasing 100% prescription medications. 90/10 $10/ $45 / $55 80/20 $10/ $35 / $45 Emergencies and Specialists Office Visits Prescriptions Gabe-endo, Elijah’s oral surgery, Erin’s wrist, chiropractor, x-rays Pharmaceutical Deductible $250/pp ? Individual DeductibleDrowning in a Sea of Deductiblesamount of money that the insured must pay before anybenefits from the health insurance policy can be used. Family Deductible
  • 45. Plan A Plan B Plan C Plan D Plan E HIGH RISK (low monthly costs / high premium) $750 LOW RISK (high monthly costs / low premiums) MONTHLY COST: $793 WHAT IF…? SCENARIO 1 $2,500 SCENARIO 2 SCENARIO 3
  • 46. We learn through...1 is the most relevant, powerful form of self-directed learning learning (70/20/10, experiential learning, etc.) (and well-framed challenges)2 visual imagery aids in comprehension (and recall), reveals patterns and relationships3 conceptual metaphors accelerate comprehension of new ideas through a rich set of cognitive associations (and narratives)4 playful interactions are engaging, personalized, lead to pattern recognition as well as serendipitous accidents and discoveries5 immediate feedback loops allow us to auto-correct and learn from mistakes6 enable us to learn with the whole body embodied cognition (and multi-sensory experiences)7 humor, surprise, delight arouse the brain and are more likely to be recalled later on; amygdala is emotional center & index to memories
  • 47. Play is the answer to howanything new comes about.–JEAN PIAGET
  • 48. http://vimeo.com/36579366
  • 49. Watch this!http://vimeo.com/36579366
  • 50. We learn through...1 is the most relevant, powerful form of self-directed learning learning (70/20/10, experiential learning, etc.) (and well-framed challenges)2 visual imagery aids in comprehension (and recall), reveals patterns and relationships3 conceptual metaphors accelerate comprehension of new ideas through a rich set of cognitive associations (and narratives)4 playful interactions are engaging, personalized, lead to pattern recognition as well as serendipitous accidents and discoveries5 immediate feedback loops allow us to auto-correct and learn from mistakes6 enable us to learn with the whole body embodied cognition (and multi-sensory experiences)7 humor, surprise, delight arouse the brain and are more likely to be recalled later on; amygdala is emotional center & index to memories
  • 51. http://letsfreckle.com/
  • 52. http://letsfreckle.com/
  • 53. http://letsfreckle.com/
  • 54. http://letsfreckle.com/
  • 55. http://letsfreckle.com/
  • 56. We learn through...1 is the most relevant, powerful form of self-directed learning learning (70/20/10, experiential learning, etc.) (and well-framed challenges)2 visual imagery aids in comprehension (and recall), reveals patterns and relationships3 conceptual metaphors accelerate comprehension of new ideas through a rich set of cognitive associations (and narratives)4 playful interactions are engaging, personalized, lead to pattern recognition as well as serendipitous accidents and discoveries5 immediate feedback loops allow us to auto-correct and learn from mistakes6 enable us to learn with the whole body embodied cognition (and multi-sensory experiences)7 humor, surprise, delight arouse the brain and are more likely to be recalled later on; amygdala is emotional center & index to memories
  • 57. Thinking, then doing.
  • 58. MONTESSORI?
  • 59. “pick up the pencil”
  • 60. A Walk Through the Solar System http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/yss/display.cfm?ThemeID=1&Tab=Featured%20Activityhttp://www.airspacemag.com/space-exploration/A-Walk-Through-the-Solar-System.html#
  • 61. “By rearranging the board, the player acquired information that was otherwise difficult to perceive. Although she could have acquired this information by mentally simulating the move, it was simpler and faster to physically carry out the move and then reverse it. More importantly, the problem space is now partly in the head and partly in the world, with interaction linking and blending these two spaces together.Interacting with the environment—in this example, rearranging it to address animmediate epistemic need—can generate insight into a problem by treating theenvironment as a resource for reducing cognitive complexity. Instead of relyingexclusively on an internal representation, the player creates, and operates on, anexternal representation of the problem space. Thus, interaction creates bothphysical and informational changes in the environment. The player can thenleverage these informational changes to simplify cognitively complex tasks.”— KARL FAST, “Interaction and the epistemic potential of digital libraries”
  • 62. “By rearranging the board, the player acquired information that was otherwise difficult to perceive. Although she could have acquired this information by mentally simulating the move, it was simpler and faster to physically carry out the move and then reverse it. More importantly, the problem space is now partly in the head and partly in the world, with interaction linking and blending these two spaces together.Interacting with the environment—in this example, rearranging it to address animmediate epistemic need—can generate insight into a problem by treating theenvironment as a resource for reducing cognitive complexity. Instead of relyingexclusively on an internal representation, the player creates, and operates on, anexternal representation of the problem space. Thus, interaction creates bothphysical and informational changes in the environment. The player can thenleverage these informational changes to simplify cognitively complex tasks.”— KARL FAST, “Interaction and the epistemic potential of digital libraries” Read this! http://www.springerlink.com/content/4755373gw24g00l8/?MUD=MP
  • 63. Thinking, then doing.
  • 64. Thinking, then doing.Thinking through doing.
  • 65. PRAGMATIC(Actions performed to bring one physically closer to a goal) VS EPISTEMIC ACTIONS (Actions that use the world to improve cognition) Thinking, then doing.Thinking through doing.
  • 66. We learn through...1 is the most relevant, powerful form of self-directed learning learning (70/20/10, experiential learning, etc.) (and well-framed challenges)2 visual imagery aids in comprehension (and recall), reveals patterns and relationships3 conceptual metaphors accelerate comprehension of new ideas through a rich set of cognitive associations (and narratives)4 playful interactions are engaging, personalized, lead to pattern recognition as well as serendipitous accidents and discoveries5 immediate feedback loops allow us to auto-correct and learn from mistakes6 enable us to learn with the whole body embodied cognition (and multi-sensory experiences)7 humor, surprise, delight arouse the brain and are more likely to be recalled later on; amygdala is emotional center & index to memories
  • 67. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things Learning Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Sense-Making, Education
  • 68. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things Learning Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Sense-Making, Education
  • 69. Let’s start with what’s already familiar…
  • 70. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRGLkj-PsCc&playnext=1&list=PL61C1FA48D599E306&feature=results_video
  • 71. http://vimeo.com/45704273
  • 72. http://www.reactable.com/products/live/
  • 73. http://www.misfitwearables.com/
  • 74. sM ag ic!It’ http://www.misfitwearables.com/
  • 75. Senseg
  • 76. Tactus Technologies
  • 77. http://www.chrisharrison.net/index.php/Research/TapSense
  • 78. Changes in how we interact…keyboard/mouse touchscreen kaboom!
  • 79. www.leapmotion.com
  • 80. www.getmyo.com
  • 81. LUMOback sensor and mobile app.Worn around the waist, the thin sensor bandgently vibrates when you slouch from yourlower back. The LUMOback sensor sendsgentle vibrations when you slouch backwardswith your lower back, reminding you to sit orstand up straight.Using the latest Bluetooth technology,LUMOback tracks your movements wirelesslyand gives you feedback through a smartdevice. http://lumoback.com/
  • 82. HAPIfork works by monitoring the exact time you start and end your meal, the amount of servings you take per minute, and how long you take to eat each serving. The fork measures the intervals between bringing the fork from your plate to your mouth and back again, and then sends a gentle vibration your way when youre eating too fast. When youre done eating, data is transmitted from the fork to your HAPIfork account, either via Bluetooth or by connecting the fork to your computer via USB.http://www.hapilabs.com/products-hapifork.asp
  • 83. The really far out stuff…
  • 84. http://leejinha.com/ZeroN
  • 85. http://www.spicytec.com/2011/05/music-can-be-touched.html
  • 86. http://pinterest.com/stephenpa/smart-objects/
  • 87. http://www.zebraimaging.com/products/print-a-hologram
  • 88. Your Future Robotic HandWill Be Able To DetectEverything From AbnormalBreast Lumps To EnlargedLymph Nodes http://www.fastcoexist.com/1680406/your-future-robotic-hand-will-be-able-to-detect-everything-from-abnormal-breast-lumps-to-enl#6
  • 89. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things Learning Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Sense-Making, Education
  • 90. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. ? New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things Learning Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Sense-Making, Education
  • 91. http://www.sifteo.com
  • 92. “ Motion Math has turned math into a physical activity.” http://motionmathgames.com/
  • 93. STMathhttp://www.creativitypost.com/education/teaching_without_words
  • 94. “The approach to teaching withoutwords that I’m proposing makesheavy use of interactivity andinstant informative feedback.” STMath http://www.creativitypost.com/education/teaching_without_words
  • 95. GameDeskhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=CCp_9304j3Q
  • 96. NOTtechnology fortechnology’s sake.
  • 97. Is it a manipulative?
  • 98. Is it a manipulative?Is it something youcan interact with?
  • 99. Is it a manipulative?Is it something youcan interact with?Does it supports self-directed learning?
  • 100. Is it a manipulative?Is it something youcan interact with?Does it supports self-directed learning?Does it provideimmediate feedback,helping the studentauto-correct errors?
  • 101. Is it a manipulative?Is it something youcan interact with?Does it supports self-directed learning?Does it provideimmediate feedback,helping the studentauto-correct errors?
  • 102. Is it a manipulative?Is it something youcan interact with?Does it supports self-directed learning?Does it provideimmediate feedback,helping the studentauto-correct errors?
  • 103. Is it a manipulative?Is it something youcan interact with?Does it supports self-directed learning?Does it provideimmediate feedback,helping the studentauto-correct errors?
  • 104. ID EA! Is it a manipulative? Is it something you can interact with? Does it supports self- + directed learning? Does it provide immediate feedback, helping the student auto-correct errors?
  • 105. ID EA! Is it a manipulative? Is it something you can interact with? Does it supports self- + directed learning? Does it provide immediate feedback, helping the student auto-correct errors?
  • 106. ID EA!
  • 107. ID EA!
  • 108. ID EA!
  • 109. ID EA!
  • 110. 1
  • 111. 1 1
  • 112. 1 2
  • 113. 1 3
  • 114. 1 3 1
  • 115. 2 3
  • 116. 2 3 + -
  • 117. 2 3 + -
  • 118. 2 + 3=5
  • 119. 1 + 4 =5
  • 120. 2 + 4 =6
  • 121. 5 + 4 =9 3
  • 122. To B e Continued…
  • 123. Q: Where do new ideas come from?A: The intersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures. ? New TechnologySensor-Laded Devices, Smart Objects, Wearables, The Internet of Things Learning Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Sense-Making,
  • 124. Around here, we dont look backwardsfor very long. We keep moving forward,opening up new doors and doing new things,because were curious... and curiosity keepsleading us down new paths.
  • 125. What are you curious about?What do you want to know moreabout by this time next year?
  • 126. Thank you!www.slideshare.net/stephenpaslideshare.net/stephenpa getmentalnotes.comStephen P Anderson .@stephenandersonwww.poetpainter.com