Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

The Language of Interaction

Ad

the language of interaction
david sherwin

emily carr university
march 30, 2011




Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Foer,...

Ad

so, what do you do?




             interaction designer




Photo 1314251438 by HeyRocker on Flickr / CC share remix lic...

Ad

uh… what’s occupation?
                                What’s your that?




             hmm… well, how much time
       ...

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Ad

Upcoming SlideShare
Thinking Like a Storyteller
Thinking Like a Storyteller
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 73 Ad
1 of 73 Ad

The Language of Interaction

This talk is about how language plays a pivotal role in creating meaningful experiences beyond interaction design. It was delivered by David Sherwin at Emily Carr University of Art and Design on March 30, 2011.

This talk is about how language plays a pivotal role in creating meaningful experiences beyond interaction design. It was delivered by David Sherwin at Emily Carr University of Art and Design on March 30, 2011.

More Related Content

The Language of Interaction

  1. 1. the language of interaction david sherwin emily carr university march 30, 2011 Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Foer, from Visual Editions
  2. 2. so, what do you do? interaction designer Photo 1314251438 by HeyRocker on Flickr / CC share remix license
  3. 3. uh… what’s occupation? What’s your that? hmm… well, how much time do you have for me to tell you? Photo 1314251438 by HeyRocker on Flickr / CC share remix license
  4. 4. “interaction designers design for everyday life by shaping those human experiences that sit at the intersection of needs [desireability], business goals [viability], and technology [feasibility].” —www.ecuad.ca/programs/undergrad/bdesign/interaction "…interaction design is first and foremost the design of behavior that occurs over time." —Alan Cooper, David Cronin, Robert Reimann, About Face 3 "interaction is how people relate to other people through the mediating influence of product." —Richard Buchanan "interaction designers make awesome products, services, and systems that
  5. 5. “my husband studies the ways people interact with technology, then determines if any thing should be made better, and if so, how.” —Mary Paynter Sherwin
  6. 6. “my husband studies the ways people interact with technology, then determines if any thing should be made better, and if so, how.” —Mary Paynter Sherwin
  7. 7. technology: “the sum of the ways in which social groups provide themselves with the material objects of their civilization.”
  8. 8. frogMOB: Work Bikes
  9. 9. Jan Chipchase, The Mobile Frontier: A study of mobile money use in Afghanistan
  10. 10. technology changes human behavior, human behavior changes technology
  11. 11. “my husband studies the ways people interact with technology, then determines if any thing should be made better, and if so, how.” —Mary Paynter Sherwin
  12. 12. “my husband studies the ways people interact with technology, then determines if any thing should be made better, and if so, how.” —Mary Paynter Sherwin
  13. 13. 10,000 omission and/or transcription errors can occur per year for a typical 200-bed hospital or clinic how can we minimize these errors and their impact on patient care?
  14. 14. prototypes from participatory design testing sessions at frogSF with doctors and nurses
  15. 15. testing tasks via a high-fidelity interactive prototype on a touch tablet PC screen
  16. 16. industrial design interaction design communication design
  17. 17. Tree of Codes by Jonathan Safran Foer, from Visual Editions
  18. 18. let’s try a little experiment… let’s read a poem three ways: 1 you read it in your mind 2 all of you read it out loud 3 i read it and you listen
  19. 19. “Thought is thought, and not anything more. Seeing is seeing. What is is what is. These three together are what they are, and their total is one, which is what there is and is equal to zero. A is not A; one is not one; this too is the rule. Only insofar as one is speechless can one really think with words.” —from Robert Bringhurst’s “Saraha’s Exercise for Beginners,” in the book Pieces of Map, Pieces of Music
  20. 20. what just happened? we illustrated the 3 challenges both artists and designers face in trying to craft interactions
  21. 21. material you are processing metaphor the poem in practice your head, formulating its intent
  22. 22. “In interaction design, the system is the material.” —Scott Nazarian, Creative Director, frog design
  23. 23. TEXT WATCH EMAIL CALL READ language is the first material we may apply to an interaction PLAY STATUS CHAT
  24. 24. language is an interface for prototyping an experience… …and a well-designed product or service expresses a vocabulary that matches people’s needs
  25. 25. how do you cook pasta? Photo 197840294 by Oskay on Flickr / CC share remix license
  26. 26. how do you cook pasta? verbs connote action Photo 197840294 by Oskay on Flickr / CC share remix license
  27. 27. how do you cook pasta? who will initiate or receive the action? Photo 197840294 by Oskay on Flickr / CC share remix license
  28. 28. how do you cook pasta? nouns are the objects acted upon Photo 197840294 by Oskay on Flickr / CC share remix license
  29. 29. how do you cook pasta al dente? adjectives are metadata Photo 197840294 by Oskay on Flickr / CC share remix license
  30. 30. can you cook pasta al dente for dinner tonight? providing the activity’s context Photo 197840294 by Oskay on Flickr / CC share remix license
  31. 31. can you cook pasta al dente for dinner tonight? Illustration by Mark Baskinger from the forthcoming book Drawing Ideas
  32. 32. and make me a cup of iced tea? “A cup of…” by industrial designer Tithi Kutchamuch from Creative Workshop
  33. 33. and can you help me resist eating dessert? Temptd, a social support application by frog design, partnering with MTV’s I Used to Be Fat
  34. 34. individual actions USE CASES VOCABULARY IS ACTED UPON sum of actions required to TASKS complete task CONTEXT CHANGES time, place, and CONTEXT people involved motivations for GOALS CONSEQUENCES initiating a task CHANGE DESIRED BEHAVIOR: LOSE WEIGHT
  35. 35. through research, we capture the real and the incorporeal: desires, hopes, beliefs, needs, wants, frustrations, motivations…
  36. 36. through design, we capture the real and the incorporeal: desires, hopes, beliefs, needs, wants, frustrations, motivations…
  37. 37. through painting, we capture the real and the incorporeal: desires, hopes, beliefs, needs, wants, frustrations, motivations…
  38. 38. through film, we capture the real and the incorporeal: desires, hopes, beliefs, needs, wants, frustrations, motivations…
  39. 39. through sculpture, we capture the real and the incorporeal: desires, hopes, beliefs, needs, wants, frustrations, motivations…
  40. 40. with the right insight, we can clarify intent and increase our support of desired behaviors
  41. 41. over time, desired interactions can accumulate into a liveable story we hope to inhabit
  42. 42. “The Future of Health Care Is Social” by frog design
  43. 43. “The secret is in listening to the words, and arranging, and listening, and listening again. —Robert Wallace, Writing Poems
  44. 44. material you are processing metaphor the poem in practice your head, formulating its intent
  45. 45. material i map the intent of my words metaphor to the intent practice of yours, finding where A = B
  46. 46. “metaphor: a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance…” —Dictionary.com
  47. 47. i’m not talking about small metaphors…
  48. 48. …or big, poorly constructed ones Photo 3928200642 by x-ray delta one on Flickr / CC share remix license
  49. 49. metaphors are at the heart of how we model interactive systems
  50. 50. PATTERNS repetitive pathways and structures PRINCIPLES guidelines preserving the integrity of the above FEATURE CLUSTERS functionality organized fit to the patterns BEHAVIOR OVER TIME use of animation, transition, and motion
  51. 51. understand the metaphor of a system, know how to shape interactions within it
  52. 52. new modes of input allow new metaphors to emerge “SAM Gets Dirty” by designer Mark Notermann from Creative Workshop
  53. 53. material you are processing metaphor the poem in practice your head, formulating its intent
  54. 54. material i map the intent of my words metaphor to the intent practice of yours, finding where A = B
  55. 55. material focusing your individual voice, metaphor informed by practice the experiences of your peers
  56. 56. “A new poem is created by everyone that reads poetically— not that its raw material is original… but that every individual brings with him, when he exercises his individuality, a way of seeing and feeling that in its interaction with old material creates something new, something previously not existing in experience.” —from John Dewey’s Art as Experience
  57. 57. so it goes for a designer… our experience is summative
  58. 58. Photo 2425646723 by Bekathwia on Flickr / CC share remix license
  59. 59. material art and design, stitched together metaphor by technology practice and language
  60. 60. digital + interaction interactive arts design animation film, video + integrated technology media ceramics critical and industrial sculpture design cultural practice print media photography language arts visual arts drawing illustration communication painting design ART “THE INTERFACES” DESIGN
  61. 61. language may be our v1 interface for summarizing experience
  62. 62. but what we paint, draw, film, sculpt, and design with technology…
  63. 63. human emotion lives in the spaces between
  64. 64. “Happiness is not a noun or a verb. It’s a conjunction.” —Eric Weiner, The Geography of Bliss

×