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Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft
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Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft

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Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft

Operation and Maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft

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  • Focus on no requirement for a specific airworthiness certificate established in definition—similar to “large” aircraft and “small” aircraft definitions.
    Significant comments on definition…
    Many comments on weight --- less (900+) and more (1700) Considered comments, particularly those justifications for a small increase.
    Increase or removal of maximum Vh-115 knots
    Fixed landing gear and prop --- The need to maintain the simplicity of operation,maintenance and manufacturing drove how FAA considered those comments
  • Pertinent points here are that all LSA are issued an FAA Form 8130-7, Special Airworthiness Certificate. In Section A, Category it will either state “Light Sport” or “Experimental”. If Light Sport, the categories will be listed in Section A, Purpose. The above just happens to be “airplane” but it could be any of the other LSA Categories except Gyroplane.
    Generally, there is no expiration date for an LSA A/W Certificate, but the FAA reserves the right under certain circumstances to impose one. This may depend on the proposed type or area of operation.
    IMPORTANT: Ensure the audience knows that all LSA will have as an attachement to the A/W Certificate an “aircraft-specific” set of “OPERATION LIMITATIONS”. THESE LIMITATIONS ALONG WITH THE SPECIAL AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATE ‘MUST” BE KEPT AVAILABLE IN THE AIRCRAFT AT ALL TIMES.
  • FAA Order 8130.2G (Copied 03/04/11)
    4043. Issuance of LSA Category Aircraft Operating Limitations.
    a. Operating limitations must be designed to fit the specific situation encountered. The FAA may impose any additional limitations deemed necessary in the interest of safety. The FAA must review each imposed operating limitation with the applicant to ensure the applicant understands the operating limitations.
    b. The following operating limitations, as applicable, will be issued as shown below; any deviation must be coordinated in accordance with this order:
    (1) No person may operate this aircraft for any other purpose than that for which the aircraft was certificated. This aircraft must be operated in accordance with applicable air traffic and general operating rules of 14 CFR part 91 and all additional limitations prescribed herein. These operating limitations are a part of FAA Form 8130-7 and are to be carried in the aircraft at all times and to be available to the pilot in command of the aircraft.
    (2) The pilot in command of this aircraft must advise the passenger of the special nature of this aircraft and that the aircraft does not meet the certification requirements of a standard certificated aircraft.
    (3) This aircraft must display the word “LIGHT-SPORT” (hyphen optional) near the entrance to the cabin, cockpit, or pilot station in 2-inch minimum or a maximum of 6-inch block letters in accordance with 14 CFR § 45.23(b).
    (4) This aircraft must contain the placards and markings as required by 14 CFR § 91.9. In addition, the placards and markings must be inspected for legibility and clarity, and the associated systems inspected for easy access and operation, to ensure they function in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and the FAA-accepted consensus standards during each condition inspection.
    (5) This aircraft is to be operated under VFR, day only, unless appropriately equipped for night and/or instrument flight in accordance with 14 CFR § 91.205, and when allowed by the manufacturer’s operating instructions.
    (6) Noncompliance with these operating limitations will render the airworthiness certificate invalid. Any change, alteration, or repair not in accordance with the manufacturer’s instruction and approval will render the airworthiness certificate invalid, and the owner of the aircraft must apply for a new airworthiness certificate under the provisions of 14 CFR § 21.191 with appropriate operating limitations before further flight.
    (7) Application to amend these operating limitations must be made to the responsible geographic FSDO or MIDO.
    (8) This aircraft does not meet the requirements of the applicable, comprehensive, and detailed airworthiness code as provided by Annex 8 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation. The owner/operator of this aircraft must obtain written permission from another CAA before operating this aircraft in or over that country. That written permission must be carried aboard the aircraft together with the U.S. airworthiness certificate and, upon request, be made available to an ASI or the CAA in the country of operation.
    (9) The pilot in command of this aircraft must hold at least the appropriate category and class privileges, rating, or endorsements required by 14 CFR part 61.
    (10) No person may operate this aircraft in the light-sport category for compensation or hire except to tow a light-sport glider or an unpowered ultralight vehicle in accordance with 14 CFR § 91.309 or to conduct flight training.
    (11) This aircraft may only be operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s aircraft operating instructions, including any provisions for necessary operating equipment specified in the aircraft’s equipment list.
    (12) No person may operate this aircraft in the light-sport category for compensation or hire unless within the preceding 100 hours of time in service the aircraft has—
    (a) Been inspected by a certificated repairman with an LSA maintenance rating, or an appropriately rated mechanic, or an appropriately rated repair station in accordance with inspection procedures developed by the aircraft manufacturer or a person acceptable to the FAA, and has been returned to service in accordance with the applicable provisions of 14 CFR part 43;
    (b) Received an annual condition inspection in accordance with the operating limitation described in paragraph 4043b(14) of this order; or
    (c) Received an inspection for the issuance of an airworthiness certificate in accordance with 14 CFR part 21.
    (13) Aircraft instruments and equipment installed and used under 14 CFR § 91.205 must be inspected and maintained in accordance with the requirements of 14 CFR part 91. Any maintenance or inspection of this equipment must be recorded in the aircraft maintenance records.
  • Pertinent points here are that all LSA are issued an FAA Form 8130-7, Special Airworthiness Certificate. In Section A, Category it will either state “Light Sport” or “Experimental”. If Experimental, the purpose will be listed as “Operating Light Sport Aircraft and the categories will be listed in parentheses afterward. The above is listed as (ppc) or Powered Parachute but it could be any of the other LSA Categories.
    Generally, there is no expiration date for an LSA A/W Certificate, but the FAA reserves the right under certain circumstances to impose one. This may depend on the proposed type or area of operation.
    IMPORTANT: Ensure the audience knows that all LSA will have as an attachement to the A/W Certificate an “aircraft-specific” set of “OPERATION LIMITATIONS”. THESE LIMITATIONS ALONG WITH THE SPECIAL AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATE ‘MUST” BE KEPT AVAILABLE IN THE AIRCRAFT AT ALL TIMES.
  • See FAA Order 8130.2x for appropriate Operating Lilmitations
  • There are essentially on two categories of LSA; (Special) Light Sport and Experimental Light Sport or the A/W Certificate is issued with “Experimental-Operating Light Sport Aircraft. Part 91.327 states SLSA may be used for Towing and Flight Training and if so, they require a 100 hour inspection rather than an Annual Condition Inspection.
  • This proposal establishes a new repairman certificate with two new ratings.
    ** IMPORTANT -- These repairman will be authorized to only perform maintenance or inspections, as applicable, on LSA that are issued the two new airworthiness certificates; ELSA and SLSA.
    The two new ratings are Inspection and maintenance.
    Inspection rating is – Class, make and model and serial number specific (similar to Experimental Amateur-built repairman)
    Maintenance rating is - Class Specific
    (i.e. weight shift, airplane, power parachute etc.)
  • Inspection Rating Overview. The owner of an ELSA may apply for a repairman certificate with an inspection rating after completion of the required 16 hour training course. The training must be for the same class of aircraft for which inspection privileges are sought. This rating allows an aircraft owner to perform the required annual condition inspection on an aircraft that he or she owns which has been issued an airworthiness certificate under § 21.191(i). The aircraft will be identified on the owner’s repairman certificate by registration and serial number. The designation of privileges for this certificate is similar to that in which the privileges for the builder of an amateur-built aircraft are specified under 14 CFR part 65, § 65.104. If an individual owns several similar makes and models of light-sport aircraft or owns a light-sport aircraft in another class, that individual will be issued a repairman certificate which lists each aircraft the repairman is eligible to inspect if the required training is completed.
  • Maintenance Rating Overview.
    (1) Any individual may apply for a repairman (light-sport aircraft) certificate with a maintenance rating after completion of the required training for a specific class of light-sport aircraft. The length of required training varies depending on the class of aircraft for which privileges are sought. A repairman with a maintenance rating may perform maintenance and required inspections on SLSA within the class he or she is rated. A repairman may also hold several aircraft class ratings on his or her repairman certificate. Each rating will allow the individual to perform the annual condition inspection for experimental light-sport aircraft within that class.
    (2) Prior to approving any aircraft or part for return to service the repairman performing the work must have previously performed the work concerned satisfactorily. If the work has not been previously performed the repairman may show the ability to do the work by performing it to the satisfaction of the FAA or by performing it under the direct supervision of an appropriately certificated, rated, and experienced mechanic or repairman. The repairman performing the work also must understand the current instructions of the manufacturer and the maintenance manuals for the work. The FAA would not consider it appropriate for a repairman with a maintenance rating to perform an engine overhaul for the first time on a 2-cycle or 4-cycle engine unless that repairman, for example, could show that he or she has successfully completed additional training on the overhaul of the specific make and model engine from the engine manufacturer or other accepted training provider.
  • CONTENTS OF A REPAIRMAN (LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT) INSPECTION RATING TRAINING COURSE. Each 16-hour training course the FAA has specifically determined to be acceptable has been audited by the FAA and found adequate to train an individual with a limited maintenance background to properly inspect their own ELSA. The training is to a level of proficiency that will enable the repairman, without assistance, to make a sound judgment whether or not the aircraft is in a condition for safe operation.
    SPECIFIC HOUR REQUIREMENTS TO OBTAIN A REPAIRMAN (LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT) CERTIFICATE WITH A MAINTENANCE RATING. The applicant for a maintenance rating must successfully complete one of the five class rating courses that range between 80 to 120 hours. Each course must be acceptable to the FAA. Courses specifically determined to be acceptable to the FAA have been assigned an FAA course number. Courses without an FAA course number may not be acceptable to the FAA. The training course requirements are based on a modular system composed of core modules and specific class modules. Combinations of core and specific class modules determine the number of hours required for each individual class of aircraft. Each training course should address the inspection techniques and maintenance practices necessary to maintain that particular class of light-sport aircraft.
  • CONTENTS OF A REPAIRMAN (LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT) INSPECTION RATING TRAINING COURSE. Each 16-hour training course the FAA has specifically determined to be acceptable has been audited by the FAA and found adequate to train an individual with a limited maintenance background to properly inspect their own ELSA. The training is to a level of proficiency that will enable the repairman, without assistance, to make a sound judgment whether or not the aircraft is in a condition for safe operation.
    SPECIFIC HOUR REQUIREMENTS TO OBTAIN A REPAIRMAN (LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT) CERTIFICATE WITH A MAINTENANCE RATING. The applicant for a maintenance rating must successfully complete one of the five class rating courses that range between 80 to 120 hours. Each course must be acceptable to the FAA. Courses specifically determined to be acceptable to the FAA have been assigned an FAA course number. Courses without an FAA course number may not be acceptable to the FAA. The training course requirements are based on a modular system composed of core modules and specific class modules. Combinations of core and specific class modules determine the number of hours required for each individual class of aircraft. Each training course should address the inspection techniques and maintenance practices necessary to maintain that particular class of light-sport aircraft.
  • This slide is self-explanatory and is basically a review of repairman privileges related to the Annual Condition Inspection for LSA.
  • FAR 43 does not apply to Experimental category aircraft and therefore, almost anyone can legally perform maintenance.
    However, for SLSA aircraft FAR 43 does apply. There is only one exception in FAR 43.1 that exempts LSA aircraft for reporting Major Repairs and Alterations on an FAA Form 337. All other sections of FAR 43 apply.
    No matter who performs the maintenance on SLSA, they must have current data, appropriate tools (some may be outlined by the manufacturer in the MM), as well as the training and experience to perform the job function. For the A&P, FAR 65.81; 65.85; and 65.87 apply.
  • Information slide. Speak to the issues in the RED font to inform the audience of some of the items contained in the Consensus Standard (ASTM).
    A consensus standard (ASTM) is NOT developed by the FAA, but by industry alone. ASTM are only “Accepted” by the FAA and NOT approved.
    The ASTM applies to the “aircraft design” NOT the aircraft “Type Design”. Therefore, an LSA may NEVER be determined to be Airworthy, but only “safe for flight”
    An ASTM is a type of Standard, but it is ONLY a “Certification Standard”.
    Some of the items that an ASTM requires of the manufacturer are:
    Operating Instructions
    Maintenance and Inspection Procedures
    Identification and recording of Major Repairs and Alterations. (Notice the word “identification”; the manufacturer is the only one who can “identify” a major repair or alteration.
    And “All” instructions for continued airworhiness.
  • Table of Consensus Standards for Light Sport Aircraft found on the FAA Light Sport Branch web site. Explain that in addition to different standards for each LSA class, they are broken down into Topics.
    1st click of mouse will show classes in horizontal box.
    2nd click of mouse will show topics in vertical box.
  • The Owner and/or Operator of an LSA has certain responsibilities that must be met that are outlined in the “appropriate class” Consensus Standard (ASTM). The following is an excerpt from an ASTM:
    5.4 Owner/Operator Responsibilities:
    5.4.1 Each owner/operator of a LSA shall read and comply with the maintenance and continued airworthiness information and instructions provided by the manufacturer.
    5.4.2 Each owner/operator of a LSA shall be responsible for providing the manufacturer with current contact information where the manufacturer may send the owner/operator supplemental notification bulletins.
    5.4.3 The owner/operator of a LSA shall be responsible for notifying the manufacturer of any safety of flight issue or significant service difficulty upon discovery.
    5.4.4 The owner/operator of a LSA shall be responsible for complying with all manufacturer issued notices of corrective action and for complying with all applicable aviation authority regulations in regard to maintaining the airworthiness of the LSA.
    5.4.5 An owner of a LSA shall ensure that any needed corrective action be completed as specified in a notice, or by the next scheduled annual inspection.
    5.4.6 Should an owner/operator not comply with any mandatory service requirement, the LSA shall be considered not in compliance with applicable ASTM standards and may be subject to regulatory action by the presiding aviation authority.
  • The questions arises of how does the LSA repairman report problems. There is no requirement for the LSA Repairman to report problems, but it is highly recommended they report to the Service Difficulty Reporting portal. The ASTM requires that problems are to be reported to the manufacturer.
  • PERFORMANCE OF MAJOR REPAIRS AND MAJOR ALTERATIONS BY A REPAIRMAN (LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT) WITH A MAINTENANCE RATING. A repairman may not perform a major repair or major alteration on a product produced under an FAA approval. However prior to performing a major repair on a product not produced under an FAA approval, the repairman must complete additional training acceptable to the FAA and appropriate to the work performedThis training may consist of additional training in areas such as welding, overhauls, engine gear reduction units, major repairs to structures, or major repairs to fabric. For example, if a repairman with a maintenance rating successfully completed a light- sport aircraft engine manufacturer’s course in overhaul of a particular make and model engine or gear reduction unit, or a light-sport aircraft manufacturer’s course that teaches welding of steel or aluminum structures, he or she would be permitted to perform major repairs to those manufacturers’ products.
  • LSA have no Type Certificates as they are certified to an ASTM and must be maintained to the specific ASTM and must be maintained to this standard through the use of the manufacturers maintenance instructions.
    Manufacturer’s Maintenance Manuals contain all the information needed to maintain the aircraft. In some circumstances, there is more information than wanted. Keep in contact with the manufacturer.
    Safety Directives as released from the LSA manufacturer bear the same weight as an Airworhthiness Directive for a Standard Category Aircraft. The must be complied with.
    PERFORMANCE OF MAJOR REPAIRS AND MAJOR ALTERATIONS BY A REPAIRMAN (LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT) WITH A MAINTENANCE RATING. A repairman may not perform a major repair or major alteration on a product produced under an FAA approval. However prior to performing a major repair on a product not produced under an FAA approval, the repairman must complete additional training acceptable to the FAA and appropriate to the work performedThis training may consist of additional training in areas such as welding, overhauls, engine gear reduction units, major repairs to structures, or major repairs to fabric. For example, if a repairman with a maintenance rating successfully completed a light- sport aircraft engine manufacturer’s course in overhaul of a particular make and model engine or gear reduction unit, or a light-sport aircraft manufacturer’s course that teaches welding of steel or aluminum structures, he or she would be permitted to perform major repairs to those manufacturers’ products.
  • Just like any aircraft, sport aircraft have manufactures manuals to train and guide the mechanic and owner through maintenance tasks.
    Notice in the red font; Some things are a somewhat new to an A&P or Repair Station.
  • This is an excerpt from the Rotax 912 Light Maintenance Manual. As can be seen, Rotax requires that whoever works on their engines received training from BRP-Powertrain, which is actually Rotax.
    March 4, 2011: There is an FAA Notice, now held up in the legal department, that is coming out soon that will address this issue. Basically, there is something called the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 USC Subchapter II, that states a Federal Government Agency cannot delegate rulemaking authority to any other entity. Rotax is in effect making a rule stating they are the only source for Rotax engine training and the Notice may change this.
  • This regulation is pretty self-explanatory. It includes the MSC that contains requirements for the manufacturer.
  • Remember Part 43 applies to SLSA.
    Just emphasize the elements of both 4313 a and b.
  • Precautions for the A&P. Again emphasize the elements of the regs here.
  • FAR 65.107 is specific to LSA Repairman with a Maintenance Rating. There is not too much elaboration from the words of the slide; pretty simple.
  • Of course these bullets are listed within 91.327, Light Sport Operating Limitations. This ties in all the other slides for maintenance. Keep emphasizing that any maintenance provider, must contact and stay in touch with the manufacturer before and during any maintenance. This cannot be over-emphasized.
  • Drive home the issue of the Safety Directives issued by the manufacturer. The FAA does not issue such directives, but they are mandatory if on is to maintain the aircraft to the ASTM.
  • This is just another reference that brings full circle the limitations of who may perform LSA Maintenance. This is the Light Sport Repairman Certification Advisory Circular.
  • This and the next slide with show the difference between recording an Annual Condition Inspection for an SLSA and an Experimental LSA aircraft.
  • Light Sport Branch and what they do.
  • LSA contact info.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Light Sport Aircraft Operation / Maintenance Presented by the FAA Safety Team FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration
    • 2. What Is A Light Sport Aircraft ? Small, Simple, Low-performance, Other Than a Helicopter That: LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 2
    • 3. Categories • Special Light Sport Aircraft (SLSA) – Reference: 14 CFR Part 21.190 – Ready To Fly From Manufacturer – Uses: Personal, Towing, Flight Training • Experimental – Operating Light Sport Aircraft – – – – – Reference: 14 CFR Part 21.191(i) Light Sport Kit Aircraft Kit-built Light Sport Aircraft Downgrade From SLSA Personal Use Only LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 3
    • 4. CLASSES Glider Airplane Powered Parachute Weight Shift Control Lighter-Than-Air Gyroplane LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 4
    • 5. Markings – 14 CFR Part 45 • Registration Markings – Special LSA – At Least 12 Inches High – Experimental – LSA – At Least 3 Inches High • Placarding - 2 Inches To 6 Inches High: – SLSA – The Word, “Light Sport” – ELSA – The Word “Experimental” Reference AC 45-2 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 5
    • 6. SPECIAL LIGHT SPORT LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 6
    • 7. SLSA OPERATING LIMITATIONS HE AC TT A IR A TO D LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 ES IN TH OR W CE S TIF R Federal Aviation Administration TE CA I 7
    • 8. EXPERIMENTAL LIGHT SPORT LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 8
    • 9. ELSA OPERATING LIMITATIONS HE AC TT A IR A TO D LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 ES IN TH OR W CE S TIF R Federal Aviation Administration TE CA I 9
    • 10. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 10
    • 11. LSA Inspections • Special Light Sport (SLSA) – Annual Condition Inspections – Used For Towing or Flight Training • 100 hour inspections • Experimental Light Sport (ELSA) – Annual Condition Inspections LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 11
    • 12. Light Sport Repairman There is One Light Sport Repairman Certificate. Two Ratings: –Inspection –Maintenance 14 CFR Part 65.107 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 12
    • 13. LSA Repairman Certificate • Inspection Rating – Certificate Issued To Aircraft Owner (ELSA Only) • Aircraft Class, S/N, “N” Number – Requires 16 Hours Of Training In Aircraft Class – Suspended Upon Sale Of Aircraft – Privileges • Annual Condition Inspection Of Owner’s Aircraft LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 13
    • 14. LSA Repairman Certificate • Maintenance Rating – Issued By Class of Aircraft • Not Issued For Gyroplanes – Must Complete Required Training For Class – Privileges: • Annual Condition Inspections (Both SLSA/ELSA) • Maintenance on SLSA Aircraft By Class – – – – 100 Hour Inspections (Towing, Flight Training) Perform FAA Airworthiness Directives Perform Manufacturer’s Safety Directives Major Repair & Alterations » Only By Approval of Manufacturer LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 14
    • 15. Repairman Training CORE MODULES HOURS 1 Regulatory & Maintenance Overview 16 2 Airframe (General) 24 3 Engine & Propeller 45 85 CLASS MODULES 4 Airplane 35 5 Weight Shift Control 19 6 Powered Parachute 19 7 Lighter-Than-Air 64 8 Glider 40 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 15
    • 16. Repairman Training CLASS MODULE 1 2 3 4 Airplane ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Weight Shift ✔ ✔ ✔ Powered Parachute ✔ ✔ ✔ Lighter-Than-Air ✔ Glider ✔ Powered Glider ✔ LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 5 6 7 8 TOTAL HOURS 120 ✔ 104 ✔ 104 ✔ 80 ✔ ✔ ✔ 80 ✔ 125 Federal Aviation Administration 16
    • 17. Annual Condition Inspection • ELSA – – – – – Owner With Inspection Rating Repairman With Maintenance Rating Airframe & Powerplant Mechanic Appropriately Rated Part 145 Repair Station • SLSA – – Repairman With Maintenance Rating – Airframe & Powerplant Mechanic – Appropriately Rated Part 145 Repair Station LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 17
    • 18. Maintenance• ELSA – Anyone • SLSA – Repairman: Maintenance Rating • With The Appropriate Class – Airframe & Powerplant Mechanic • Must Meet Part 65.81 – Previously Performed – Appropriately Rated Part 145 Repair Station • Preventive Maintenance – Part 43, Appendix A (c) LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 18
    • 19. What Is a Consensus Standard? A consensus standard is an industry-developed standard that applies to aircraft design, production, and airworthiness. It is accepted by the FAA for the purpose of certificating light-sport aircraft. It includes, but is not limited to, standards for aircraft design and performance, required equipment, manufacturer quality assurance systems, production acceptance test procedures, operating instructions, maintenance and inspection procedures, identification and recording of major repairs and major alterations, and continued airworthiness. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 19
    • 20. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 20
    • 21. ASTM-Continued Operational Safety • Owner/Operator Responsibilities – Shall Comply With Manufacturer’s Instructions – Shall Provide Mfg With Current Contact Information – Shall Notify The Mfg of Safety of Flight or Significant Service Difficulty Upon Discovery – Shall Comply With All Mfg. Notices, Corrective Actions, And CAA Regulations – Shall Ensure Needed Corrective Actions Completed – If Owner Does Not Comply With Mandatory Service Requirement, ASTM Considered Not Met. ASTM F2295-06, 5.4 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 21
    • 22. Operating Limitations… (6) Noncompliance with these operating limitations will render the airworthiness certificate invalid. Any change, alteration, or repair not in accordance with the manufacturer’s instruction and approval will render the airworthiness certificate invalid, and the owner of the aircraft must apply for a new airworthiness certificate under the provisions of 14 CFR § 21.191 with appropriate operating limitations before further flight. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 22
    • 23. AC 65-32 – Certification of LSA Repairman NOTE: If a major malfunction or defect is found during the annual condition inspection, it is strongly recommended that the repairman, mechanic, or repair station report the problem to the FAA via the Internet at: http://av-info.faa.gov/sdrx/ within 72 hours and also to the aircraft’s manufacturer. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 23
    • 24. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 24
    • 25. Repairman Rating Review • Inspection Rating: – ELSA Only – 16hrs Training; Issued To Aircraft Owner – Annual Condition Inspections For Owner’s Aircraft • Maintenance Rating: – – – – SLSA & ELSA Appropriate “Class” Training Before Issue Perform Annual Condition Inspection/100 Hour Major Repairs & Alterations – Only Per Manufacturer • May Require Additional Training (Decision Of Mfg) LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 25
    • 26. Precautions LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 26 26
    • 27. Maintenance Manuals Contains Information Such As: • Ground Test. • Check of Liquid Levels. • Re-torque Cylinder Head Nuts. • Re-torque Exhaust Manifold Screws. • Check of Rewind Starter Rope. • Rewind Starter Dismantling. • Rewind Starter Reassembly. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 27
    • 28. Precautions Rotax 912 Rotax 914 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 28
    • 29. Rotax LMM-912 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 29
    • 30. Precautions – 14 CFR Part 21.190(c) • Manufacturer’s Statement of Compliance – The Aircraft Meets its Design Data & ASTM – Manufacturer Will Make Available to Any Interested Party: • Aircraft Operating Instructions • Aircraft’s Maintenance & Inspection Procedures • Manufacturer Will Monitor And Correct Safety-of-flight Issues Through The Issuance of SAFETY DIRECTIVES. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 30
    • 31. Precautions • 14 CFR Part 43.13(a) – Each Person Performing Maintenance Shall: • Use The Methods, Techniques, & Practices Prescribed In The “Current” Manufacturer’s Maintenance Manual. • Use The Proper Tools & Equipment • Special Equipment or Test Apparatus • 14 CFR Part 43.13(b) – Shall Do Quality Work – Use Quality Materials – Equal To Its Original or Properly Alter Condition LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 31
    • 32. Precautions 14 CFR Part 65.81 •Mechanic May Not Approve For Return To Service… – Unless He Has Satisfactorily Performed It At An Earlier Date. – Must Understand The Current Instructions of The Mfg. 14 CFR Part 65.85/87(b) [For LSA] •An A&P Can Approve And Return To Service… – A Major Repair or Major Alteration Provided… – The Work Was Performed Per Instructions Developed By The Manufacturer. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 32
    • 33. Precautions 14 CFR Part 65.107(d) • LSA Repairman With Maintenance Rating May Not Approve For Return To Service An Aircraft/Part… – Unless He Has Previously Performed The Work Satisfactorily In The Past. • LSA Repairman May Not Exercise His Certificate Unless: – He Understands The Current Instructions of The Manufacturer… LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 33 33
    • 34. Precautions 14 CFR Part 91.327 LSA Operating Limitations • No Person May Operate An LSA Unless: – – – – – – – Aircraft Is Maintained By An Appropriately Rated Person Aircraft Has Had A Condition Inspection In The Last 12 Months If Use For Towing/Flight Training, Has Had a 100 Hr. Inspection Aircraft Complies With All Airworthiness Directives Aircraft Complies With All Safety Directives Each Alteration Complies With The ASTM & Authorized By Mfg. Each Major Alteration Is Authorized, Performed, & Inspected Per The Manufacturer’s Maintenance & Inspection Procedures. LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 34 34
    • 35. Precautions 14 CFR Part 91.417(a) •Aircraft Owner or Operator Shall Keep: • Records of Maintenance, Including… • The Current Status of Applicable… • Safety Directives LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 35 35
    • 36. Precautions NOTE: To work on a Special or Experimental Light Sport Aircraft, certificated Part 145 repair stations, airframe mechanics, powerplant mechanics, and repairmen (Light Sport Aircraft) must be qualified and trained on the maintenance of Light Sport Aircraft, and have the necessary data and tools to inspect the aircraft and maintain them in a condition for safe operation. AC 65-32 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 36 36
    • 37. SLSA Inspection Log Entry LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 37
    • 38. ELSA Inspection Log Entry LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 38
    • 39. References • • • • • • • • • 14 CFR Part 21.190 – SLSA 14 CFR Part 21.191(i) – ELSA 14 CFR Part 43.1(b)(2); (d) Applicability 14 CFR Part 65.107 – LSA Repairman 14 CFR Part 91.319 – ELSA Ops Limits 14 CFR Part 91.327 – SLSA Ops Limits FAA Order 8900.1, Vol. 5, Ch. 5 – Repairman FAA Order 8130.2 – Cert. of Aircraft AC 65-32 – Certification & Training of LSA Repairman LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 39
    • 40. http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/afs/afs600/afs610/ LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 40
    • 41. FAA Light Sport Branch Contact Information Larry L. Buchanan Branch Manager AFS-610 Phone: (405) 954-6400 Fax: (405) 954-6688 Mailing Address: U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center P.O. Box 25082 Oklahoma City, OK 73125 LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 41
    • 42. Contact your local FAASTeam Program Manager LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT – FAA SAFETY TEAM FY 2012 Federal Aviation Administration 42

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