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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Matter, Energy, and the Environment Unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 3,500+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page bundled ...

This PowerPoint is one small part of the Matter, Energy, and the Environment Unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 3,500+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 20 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus: Matter, Dark Matter, Elements and Compounds, States of Matter, Solids, Liquids, Gases, Plasma, Law Conservation of Matter, Physical Change, Chemical Change, Gas Laws, Charles Law, Avogadro's Law, Ideal Gas Law, Pascal's Law, Archimedes Principle, Buoyancy, Seven Forms of Energy, Nuclear Energy, Electromagnet Spectrum, Waves / Wavelengths, Light (Visible Light), Refraction, Diffraction, Lens, Convex / Concave, Radiation, Electricity, Lightning, Static Electricity, Magnetism, Coulomb's Law, Conductors, Insulators, Semi-conductors, AC and DC current, Amps, Watts, Resistance, Magnetism, Faraday's Law, Compass, Relativity, Einstein, and E=MC2, Energy, First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics-Third Law of Thermodynamics, Industrial Processes, Environmental Studies, The 4 R's, Sustainability, Human Population Growth, Carrying Capacity, Green Design, Renewable Forms of Energy (The 11th Hour)

This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

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Forms of Energy, Physical Science Lesson PowerPoint Presentation Transcript

  • 1. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 2. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Ice Melting Water Boiling Vapor GasT E M P Heat Added 
  • 3. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 4. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link:
  • 5.  New Area of Focus: Energy
  • 6. •THINK TINSTAAFL Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 7. • What is TINSTAAFL? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 8. • Is it a verb? To TINSTAAFL Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 9. • Is it when you have somebody’s eyeball in your eyeball? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 10. • Is this a TINSTAAFL? – A strange hotdog where the bun is really a clump of French Fries. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 11. • Or is it a type of sneaker that looks like your barefoot when your actually wearing sneakers that look like a person’s bare feet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 12. • Is a TINSTAAFL a fully loaded groundhog ready to fight? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 13. • Is a TINSTAAFL a fully loaded groundhog ready to fight? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “GET READY TO TINSTAAFL!”
  • 14. •THINK TINSTAAFL Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 15. •THINK TINSTAAFL Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 16.  Energy cannot be created or destroyed but can diminish in quality from useful to less useful. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 17.  Energy comes from somewhere – Nothing is free. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 18. Big Bang
  • 19. Big Bang
  • 20. Big Bang Particles join together
  • 21. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets
  • 22. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons
  • 23. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons
  • 24. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons Plants harness Photons to make sugars
  • 25. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons Plants harness Photons to make sugars Chemical Energy / Gunpowder (Potential)
  • 26. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons Plants harness Photons to make sugars Chemical Energy / Gunpowder (Potential) Kinetic Energy (Bullet)
  • 27. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons Plants harness Photons to make sugars Chemical Energy / Gunpowder (Potential) Kinetic Energy (Bullet) Heat
  • 28. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons Plants harness Photons to make sugars Chemical Energy / Gunpowder (Potential) Kinetic Energy (Bullet) Heat Sound
  • 29. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons Plants harness Photons to make sugars Chemical Energy / Gunpowder (Potential) Kinetic Energy (Bullet) Heat Sound Light
  • 30. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons Plants harness Photons to make sugars Chemical Energy / Gunpowder (Potential) Kinetic Energy (Bullet) Heat Sound Light
  • 31. Big Bang Particles join together Gravity attracts particles, forms stars, planets Sun releases particles, photons Plants harness Photons to make sugars Chemical Energy / Gunpowder (Potential) Kinetic Energy (Bullet) Heat Sound Light
  • 32.  Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 33.  Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 34.  Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 35.  Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 36.  Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 37.  Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 38.  Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 39.  Energy can be transformed from one form to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 40. Differences in temperature causes differences in pressure between high and low which drives the wind.
  • 41. Learn more at… http://hyperphysics.phy- astr.gsu.edu/hbase/conser.html
  • 42. • Video Link! (Optional) Khan Academy, • 1st Law of Thermodynamics. (Advanced) – http://www.khanacademy.org/video/first-law- of-thermodynamics--internal- energy?playlist=Chemistry
  • 43.  Area of Focus: Forms of Energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 44. END MATTE Can you do it?
  • 45. • Please match the picture to the correct forms of energy on the next slide in small groups. – Be prepared to present. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 46. • One more time….
  • 47.  The seven forms of energy  -  -  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 48.  Mechanical Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 49. • Review! Mechanical Energy: The sum of kinetic and potential energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 50. • Review! Mechanical Energy: The sum of kinetic and potential energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 51. • Potential Energy: (PE) The energy stored by an object as a result of its position. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 52. Potential Enegy (PE) Kinetic Energy (KE)
  • 53. Potential Enegy (PE) Kinetic Energy (KE)
  • 54. Potential Enegy (PE) Kinetic Energy (KE)
  • 55. • Potential Energy is the energy of position. Objects that are elevated have a high potential energy. –Kinetic Energy is the energy of motion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 56. • Potential Energy is the energy of position. Objects that are elevated have a high potential energy. –Kinetic Energy is the energy of motion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 57. • Can anyone point out PE or KE? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 58. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 59. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 60. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 61. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 62. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 63. • Activity! PE – KE Skateboarder Simulator • Search Phet Skate Board Demo. • Download program (Free) - http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/ener gy-skate-park Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 64.  Sound Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 65.  Sound Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 66.  Sound Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This type of signal is very different from a digital signal such as a radiowave or microwave which is a sequence of discrete values.
  • 67. • Sound Energy: Caused by an object's vibrations. Sound energy is both kinetic and potential energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 68. • Optional Activity! Analog vs. Digital • Teacher will write a short message (5 words max) on a notecard. – The teacher will then show notecard to a student and that student will have relay the message “telephone game” from student to student (Analog Signal) – Teacher will race the student body and email the message to themselves or class member (Digital Signal). – Which was more efficient?
  • 69. • Optional Activity! Analog vs. Digital • Teacher will write a short message (5 words max) on a notecard. – The teacher will then show notecard to a student and that student will have relay the message “telephone game” from student to student (Analog Signal) – Teacher will race the student body and email the message to themselves or class member (Digital Signal). – Which was more efficient? – What if the activity was from one side of the planet to the other?
  • 70. • The best communication is still face to face.
  • 71. • Activity Simulator: Soundwaves • http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/sound
  • 72. • Activity! (Optional) Railroad tracks. – Tracks should not be in use for safety. – Observe the speed at which sound travels through the air vs. through a solid. – Have a few students put their ear to the track and measure several hundred meters away. – Have a few students standing near the students with their ears on the track. – Drop and object or hit the track. – Student should raise hand when they hear the sound through the air or through the track. – Make Observations and compare.
  • 73. • Which medium does sound travel the fastest in? – A.) Gas (Air) – B.) Liquid (Water) – C.) Solid
  • 74. • Which medium does sound travel the fastest in? – A.) Gas (Air) – B.) Liquid (Water) – C.) Solid
  • 75. • Sound will generally travel at around…
  • 76. • Sound will generally travel at around… – 300 meters per second in the air.
  • 77. • Sound will generally travel at around… – 300 meters per second in the air. – 1500 meters per second in a liquid.
  • 78. • Sound will generally travel at around… – 300 meters per second in the air. – 1500 meters per second in a liquid. – 2500 meters per second in a dense solid.
  • 79. • Whales used to be able to communicate with other whales in the water that were several 1000 kilometers away. (Global Network) – Noise pollution has reduced this but they can still communicate hundreds of kilometers away.
  • 80. • Whales used to be able to communicate with other whales in the water that were several 1000 kilometers away. (Global Network) – Noise pollution has reduced this but they can still communicate hundreds of kilometers away.
  • 81. • Whales used to be able to communicate with other whales in the water that were several 1000 kilometers away. (Global Network) – Noise pollution has reduced this but they can still communicate hundreds of kilometers away.
  • 82. • Activity! How to determine how far away a thunderstorm may be. – Directions on next slide.
  • 83. • Let’s Practice. – On the next slide will be the lightning, and the following slide after a blank will be the thunder. – You count the gap in time between the two in seconds and then divide by 5 to determine the miles, or 3 to determine the kilometers away. – This is just an estimate based on the speed of sound. – Speed of light is too fast to really be a part of the equation other than the start of the sound (lightning).
  • 84. • How far away was the storm?
  • 85. • Try one more time.
  • 86. • How far away was the storm?
  • 87. • Activity! Place a small wrist watch with the alarm going off into a bell jar vacuum.. – Remove air from the vacuum. – What happened to the sound?
  • 88. • Conclusion: Sound requires a medium for the vibrations to travel through.
  • 89. • Conclusion: Sound requires a medium for the vibrations to travel through. If there is no air in the jar, there can be no sound.
  • 90. • .
  • 91. • There’s no sound in the vacuum of space. – All of the sound effects that you hear are not accurate to what would happen.
  • 92. • There’s no sound in the vacuum of space. – All of the sound effects that you hear are not accurate to what would happen.
  • 93. • There’s no sound in the vacuum of space. – All of the sound effects that you hear are not accurate to what would happen.
  • 94. • There’s no sound in the vacuum of space. – All of the sound effects that you hear are not accurate to what would happen.
  • 95. • Video Link! Optional – Space Battle. – Teacher will mute sound periodically throughout the video. Which is better? More accurate to how waves behave in a vacuum or action packed? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2x3Q1ZkDIos
  • 96. • Hearing… – The hearing system is based solely on physical movement. (Not chemical such as smell and taste). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 97. • Hearing… – The hearing system is based solely on physical movement. (Not chemical such as smell and taste). – Sound occurs when it vibrates in matter. (Solid, Liquid, Gas). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 98. • Hearing… – The hearing system is based solely on physical movement. (Not chemical such as smell and taste). – Sound occurs when it vibrates in matter. (Solid, Liquid, Gas). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 99. • To hear, you must… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 100. • To hear, you must… – Direct the sound waves into the hearing part of the ear. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 101. • To hear, you must… – Direct the sound waves into the hearing part of the ear.
  • 102. • To hear, you must… – Direct the sound waves into the hearing part of the ear. – Sense the fluctuations in air pressure.
  • 103. • To hear, you must… – Direct the sound waves into the hearing part of the ear. – Sense the fluctuations in air pressure. – Translate these fluctuations into an electrical signal that your brain can understand.
  • 104. • Video Link! The Human Ear. 143 seconds – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-c5GpoD8wI Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 105. • Loudness is measured in decibels (dB) – – This is the force of sound waves against the ear. The louder the sound, the more decibels. – Ticking Watch 20 – Whisper 30 – Normal Speech 50 – Car 60 – Alarm Clock 80 – Lawn Mower 95 – Chain Saw 110 – Jackhammer 120 – Jet Engine 130 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 106. • Loudness is measured in decibels (dB) – – This is the force of sound waves against the ear. The louder the sound, the more decibels. – Ticking Watch 20 – Whisper 30 – Normal Speech 50 – Car 60 – Alarm Clock 80 – Lawn Mower 95 – Chain Saw 110 – Jackhammer 120 – Jet Engine 130 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 107. • Loudness is measured in decibels (dB) – – This is the force of sound waves against the ear. The louder the sound, the more decibels. – Ticking Watch 20 – Whisper 30 – Normal Speech 50 – Car 60 – Alarm Clock 80 – Lawn Mower 95 – Chain Saw 110 – Jackhammer 120 – Jet Engine 130 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 108. • Loudness is measured in decibels (dB) – – This is the force of sound waves against the ear. The louder the sound, the more decibels. – Ticking Watch 20 – Whisper 30 – Normal Speech 50 – Car 60 – Alarm Clock 80 – Lawn Mower 95 – Chain Saw 110 – Jackhammer 120 – Jet Engine 130 Which of the following require ear protection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 109. • Loudness is measured in decibels (dB) – – This is the force of sound waves against the ear. The louder the sound, the more decibels. – Ticking Watch 20 – Whisper 30 – Normal Speech 50 – Car 60 – Alarm Clock 80 – Lawn Mower 95 – Chain Saw 110 – Jackhammer 120 – Jet Engine 130 Which of the following require ear protection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 110. • Sounds that are too loud or that last a long time can cause Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Our sensitive hair cells that convert sound energy into electrical signals that travel to the brain can become damaged. Once damaged, our hair cells cannot grow back. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 111. • Sounds that are too loud or that last a long time can cause Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Our sensitive hair cells convert sound energy into electrical signals that travel to the brain and can become damaged. Once damaged, our hair cells cannot grow back. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 112. • Sounds that are too loud or that last a long time can cause Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Our sensitive hair cells convert sound energy into electrical signals that travel to the brain and can become damaged. Once damaged, our hair cells cannot grow back. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 113. • Sounds that are too loud or that last a long time can cause Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Our sensitive hair cells convert sound energy into electrical signals that travel to the brain and can become damaged. Once damaged, our hair cells cannot grow back. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 114. • Activity Sheet Available, Times have changed, Trials, Average. – Variance and Standard Deviation Extension
  • 115. • Activity! Finding your match by listening. – Teacher has prepared a class set of paired film canisters. – The canisters all contain different objects that create varying sounds when shaken. – Students must shake their film canister and walk around the room listening to other students shaking their canisters. – When you think you found someone with a similar sound, take a guess about the object and open the canister together. – If correct sit down, if incorrect keep trying to find your match. We will play again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 116. • Activity! Finding your match by listening. – Teacher has prepared a class set of paired film canisters. – The canisters all contain different objects that create varying sounds when shaken. – Students must shake their film canister and walk around the room listening to other students shaking their canisters. – When you think you found someone with a similar sound, take a guess about the object and open the canister together. – If correct sit down, if incorrect keep trying to find your match. We will play again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 117. • Activity! Finding your match by listening. – Teacher has prepared a class set of paired film canisters. – The canisters all contain different objects that create varying sounds when shaken. – Students must shake their film canister and walk around the room listening to other students shaking their canisters. – When you think you found someone with a similar sound, take a guess about the object and open the canister together. – If correct sit down, if incorrect keep trying to find your match. We will play again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 118. • Activity! Finding your match by listening. – Teacher has prepared a class set of paired film canisters. – The canisters all contain different objects that create varying sounds when shaken. – Students must shake their film canister and walk around the room listening to other students shaking their canisters. – When you think you found someone with a similar sound, take a guess about the object and open the canister together. – If correct sit down, if incorrect keep trying to find your match. We will play again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 119. • Activity! Finding your match by listening. – Teacher has prepared a class set of paired film canisters. – The canisters all contain different objects that create varying sounds when shaken. – Students must shake their film canister and walk around the room listening to other students shaking their canisters. – When you think you found someone with a similar sound, take a guess about the object and open the canister together. – If correct sit down, if incorrect keep trying to find your match. We will play again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 120. • Activity! Finding your match by listening. – Teacher has prepared a class set of paired film canisters. – The canisters all contain different objects that create varying sounds when shaken. – Students must shake their film canister and walk around the room listening to other students shaking their canisters. – When you think you found someone with a similar sound, take a guess about the object and open the canister together. – If correct sit down, if incorrect keep trying to find your match. We will play again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 121. • Activity! (Optional) Times Have Changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 122. • Note- The learning today will only partly be about variations in sound.
  • 123. • Note- The learning today will only partly be about variations in sound. – Learning how to conduct trials is an important skill that will occur in this activity.
  • 124. • We must use the scientific method to gather empirical and measurable evidence.
  • 125. • We must use the scientific method to gather empirical and measurable evidence. – The sample size should be large.
  • 126. • We must use the scientific method to gather empirical and measurable evidence. – The sample size should be large. – Random sampling techniques should be used.
  • 127. • We must use the scientific method to gather empirical and measurable evidence. – The sample size should be large. – Random sampling techniques should be used. – All biases should be avoided and poorly collected data should be thrown out.
  • 128. • Please create the following spreadsheet. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Trials Old New 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Trials Old New
  • 129. • Please create the following spreadsheet. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Trials Old New 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Trials Old New
  • 130. • Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped?
  • 131. • Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped? – Old = Made before 1982 – New = Made after 1982
  • 132. • Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped? – Old = Made before 1982 – New = Made after 1982
  • 133. • Activity! (Optional) Times Have Changed. – Pennies have changed in composition over the years. (Background Information) • 1793–1857 100% copper • 1857–1864 88% copper, 12% nickel • 1864–1962 bronze (95% copper, 5% tin and zinc) • 1943 zinc-coated steel • 1944–1946 brass (95% copper, 5% zinc) • 1962–1982 brass (95% copper, 5% zinc) • 1982–present 97.5% zinc, 2.5% copper
  • 134. • Activity! (Optional) Times Have Changed. – Pennies have changed in composition over the years. (Background Information) • 1793–1857 100% copper • 1857–1864 88% copper, 12% nickel • 1864–1962 bronze (95% copper, 5% tin and zinc) • 1943 zinc-coated steel • 1944–1946 brass (95% copper, 5% zinc) • 1962–1982 brass (95% copper, 5% zinc) • 1982–present 97.5% zinc, 2.5% copper
  • 135. • Make an educated guess called a hypothesis for the problem. – Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped?
  • 136. • Please drop an old penny and a new penny 15 times each from a height of 30 cm onto a hard surface and listen to the sound it makes.
  • 137. • Example of tester organizing trials. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Old Old Old Old Old New New New New New Trials Old New
  • 138. • Activity! Times Have Changed – Choose a partner for this project that was not next to you during random order collection. – Keep your random test order hidden from your new partner / listener. – Listener should keep eyes closed during each drop and until pennies have been collected. • Old and new pennies look differently. – Tester and listener must communicate for each drop. Tester says “dropping” and listener says “drop away.” Listener can open eyes when tester says pennies have been collected and mark should mark their guess on the listener spreadsheet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 139. • Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped? –Score your own sheet out of 100% • (10 pts for each correct response) –Gather the entire classes scores to obtain average / mean. • Add all of the scores and divide by the number of students. – What was the average grade (%) • Do our results answer the problem?
  • 140. • Continuation (Optional) Finding standard deviation and variance. – Standard variation is the square root on the variance. – Variance: The average of the squared differences from the mean.
  • 141. • Statistical Methods – The mean / average was… – Everyone calculate how far away their data was from the mean / average. • Ex.) The mean was 80% and I got 60% so I was 20% from the mean. – To calculate the variance, take each difference, square it, and then average the result: • Ex) 22 + 4.52 + 1.52 + 3.52 + (rest of class) Divide by total # of students = variance =
  • 142. • Statistical Methods – The mean / average was… – Everyone calculate how far away their data was from the mean / average. • Ex.) The mean was 80% and I got 60% so I was 20% from the mean. – To calculate the variance, take each difference, square it, and then average the result: • Ex) 202 + 452 + 352 + 52 + (rest of class) Divide by total # of students = variance =
  • 143. • The Standard Deviation is just the square root of the Variance. – So square the variance that we found. Example… 6523 = 80.76% We now have a standard to show which scores are high and low and to help answer our problem.
  • 144. • The Standard Deviation is just the square root of the Variance. – So square the variance that we found. Example… 6523 = 80.76% We now have a standard to show which scores are high and low and to help answer our problem.
  • 145. • Stand Deviation Calculator: – Did we calculate correctly? – http://www.mathsisfun.com/data/standard- deviation-calculator.html
  • 146. • Hearing… – The hearing system is based solely on physical movement. (Not chemical such as smell and taste). – Sound occurs when it vibrates in matter. (Solid, Liquid, Gas). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 147. • Does anyone know what Sound Navigation and Ranging stands for?
  • 148. • Does anyone know what Sound Navigation and Ranging stands for?
  • 149. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 150. • Sonar: A measuring instrument that sends out an acoustic pulse in water and measures distances in terms of the time for the echo of the pulse to return Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 151. • Sonar: A measuring instrument that sends out an acoustic pulse in water and measures distances in terms of the time for the echo of the pulse to return Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 152. • Animals use sound waves to located prey items as well as navigate in echolocation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 153. • The area around the eyes of the owl is disked shaped to allow sound waves to reflect and hit the ear.
  • 154. • The area around the eyes of the owl is disked shaped to allow sound waves to reflect and hit the ear.
  • 155. • The area around the eyes of the owl is disked shaped to allow sound waves to reflect and hit the ear.
  • 156. • The area around the eyes of the owl is disked shaped to allow sound waves to reflect and hit the ear.
  • 157.  Chemical Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 158. • Chemical Energy: The energy that is required to bond particles of matter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 159. • Chemical Energy: The energy that is required to bond particles of matter. – Chemical energy is a form of potential energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 160.  Electrical Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 161. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Electrical Energy: The energy of moving electrons. Energy is transferred as electrons move back and forth within wires.
  • 162. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Electrical Energy: The energy of moving electrons. Energy is transferred as electrons move back and forth within wires.
  • 163.  Light / Radiant (EM spectrum) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 164. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light Energy: Produced by the vibrations of electrically charged particles. Light energy is a form of kinetic energy. Light vibrations cause energy to be transmitted.
  • 165. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light Energy: Produced by the vibrations of electrically charged particles. Light energy is a form of kinetic energy. Light vibrations cause energy to be transmitted.
  • 166. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light Energy: Produced by the vibrations of electrically charged particles. Light energy is a form of kinetic energy. Light vibrations cause energy to be transmitted.
  • 167. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light Energy: Produced by the vibrations of electrically charged particles. Light energy is a form of kinetic energy. Light vibrations cause energy to be transmitted.
  • 168. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Light Energy: Produced by the vibrations of electrically charged particles. Light energy is a form of kinetic energy. Light vibrations cause energy to be transmitted.
  • 169.  Heat / Thermal Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 170. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Thermal Energy: The total kinetic energy of particles that make up an object. The more kinetic energy an object has, the more thermal energy it has. Thermal energy also deals with the number of particles that are found in an object. The faster the particles are moving, the hotter the object becomes.
  • 171. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Thermal Energy: The total kinetic energy of particles that make up an object. The more kinetic energy an object has, the more thermal energy it has. Thermal energy also deals with the number of particles that are found in an object. The faster the particles are moving, the hotter the object becomes.
  • 172. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Thermal Energy: The total kinetic energy of particles that make up an object. The more kinetic energy an object has, the more thermal energy it has. Thermal energy also deals with the number of particles that are found in an object. The faster the particles are moving, the hotter the object becomes.
  • 173. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Thermal Energy: The total kinetic energy of particles that make up an object. The more kinetic energy an object has, the more thermal energy it has. Thermal energy also deals with the number of particles that are found in an object. The faster the particles are moving, the hotter the object becomes.
  • 174. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Thermal Energy: The total kinetic energy of particles that make up an object. The more kinetic energy an object has, the more thermal energy it has. Thermal energy also deals with the number of particles that are found in an object. The faster the particles are moving, the hotter the object becomes.
  • 175.  1st Law of Thermodynamics Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 176.  1st Law of Thermodynamics  Change in energy of a system is equal to the head added to the system minus the work done. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 177.  1st Law of Thermodynamics  Change in energy of a system is equal to the head added to the system minus the work done.  You can’t get something for nothing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 178.  1st Law of Thermodynamics  Change in energy of a system is equal to the head added to the system minus the work done.  You can’t get something for nothing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 179.  1st Law of Thermodynamics  Change in energy of a system is equal to the head added to the system minus the work done.  You can’t get something for nothing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Change in Energy
  • 180.  1st Law of Thermodynamics  Change in energy of a system is equal to the head added to the system minus the work done.  You can’t get something for nothing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Change in Energy Heat Added
  • 181.  1st Law of Thermodynamics  Change in energy of a system is equal to the head added to the system minus the work done.  You can’t get something for nothing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Change in Energy Heat Added Work Done
  • 182.  2nd Law: The energy content of the universe is always diminishing in quality.  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 183.  2nd Law: The energy content of the universe is always diminishing in quality.  Heat Flow -> Warm to cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 184.  2nd Law: The energy content of the universe is always diminishing in quality.  Heat Flow -> Warm to cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 185.  2nd Law: The energy content of the universe is always diminishing in quality.  Heat Flow -> Warm to cold. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 186. • Activity! Pendulum Daredevil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sharp objects of death secured to weight and pointed outward to stab teacher.
  • 187. • Activity! Pendulum Daredevil. – I will brave the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 188. • Activity! Pendulum Daredevil. – I will brave the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. – Lift weight on string attached to ceiling so it touches nose, and let go… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 189. • Activity! Pendulum Daredevil. – I will brave the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. – Lift weight on string attached to ceiling so it touches nose, and let go… – What will happen? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 190. • Activity! Pendulum Daredevil. – Answer: The object will not hit the teacher on the way back because of the second law of thermodynamics. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 191. • Activity! Pendulum Daredevil. – Answer: The object will not hit the teacher on the way back because of the second law of thermodynamics. Energy was used to move air molecules to the side, heat was lost due to friction in the rope, sound, etc. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 192. • Is this animation accurate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 193. • You are getting sleepy. Always do your homework. Behave in class everyday. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 194. • Answer: No! The pendulum should eventually slow because of friction. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 195. • Activity! Please record the temperature in Celsius of the fluid in the three containers. – Draw picture and record temp next to drawing. In degrees Celsius. – Use two different thermometers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 196. • Activity! Please create the following in your journal and then set it up at your lab area. – Record the temp of the warm and then the cold. Temp____ C Temp____ C Temp____ C
  • 197. • Activity! Please create the following in your journal and then set it up at your lab area. – Record the temp of the warm and then the cold. – Make a prediction, mix, and then find Med. temp. Temp____ C Temp____ C Temp____ C
  • 198. • Audio Link. (Optional) Flanders and Swann 1964, The First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnbiVw_1FNs
  • 199. • The entire universe will eventually lose all usable energy.
  • 200. • The entire universe will eventually lose all usable energy.
  • 201. • The entire universe will eventually lose all usable energy.
  • 202. • The entire universe will eventually lose all usable energy.
  • 203. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 204. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 205. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 206. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 207. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 208. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 209. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 210. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 211. The energy is not destroyed, it becomes very low quality energy that can’t be used by life or to keep stars burning.
  • 212. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 213. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 214. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 215.  The third law of thermodynamics: All molecular movement stops at absolute zero. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 216.  Temperature: The degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment.  Corresponds to its molecular activity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 217.  Temperature: The degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment.  Corresponds to its molecular activity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 218. • Which of the pictures below represents hot and cold on a molecular level? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy A B
  • 219. • Answer: Molecules move faster when hot, and slower when cold. Hot Cold Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy A B
  • 220. • This is really cold. – Absolute zero has no molecular motion. – Never been reached. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 221. • Temperature: – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 222. • Can be measured in degrees Celsius. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 223. • 0 Degrees Celsius is the freezing point of water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 224. • 0 Degrees Celsius is the freezing point of water. • 100 degrees Celsius is the boiling point. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 225. • When it’s hot, the liquid inside the thermometer will expand and rise in the tube.
  • 226. • When it’s hot, the liquid inside the thermometer will expand and rise in the tube.
  • 227. • When it’s hot, the liquid inside the thermometer will expand and rise in the tube. – The opposite happens when it is cold.
  • 228. • When it’s hot, the liquid inside the thermometer will expand and rise in the tube. – The opposite happens when it is cold.
  • 229. • Kelvin Scale: Zero Kelvin is absolute zero where molecular motion stops. That is the coldest something can be. (Never been reached.) – Water freezes at 273.16K; water boils at 373.16K. K = C + 273.16° Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 230. • Kelvin Scale: Zero Kelvin is absolute zero where molecular motion stops. That is the coldest something can be. (Never been reached.) – Water freezes at 273.16K; water boils at 373.16K. K = C + 273.16° Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 231. • Molecular motion stops at zero degrees K. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 232. • Activity! Red Light, Green Light. Except it’s Zero K, Warm Again. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 233. • Activity (Optional) Red Light Green Light
  • 234. • Activity (Optional) Red Light Green Light Zero K Warm Again
  • 235. • Activity (Optional) Red Light Green Light Warm Again Again
  • 236. • Activity (Optional) Red Light Green Light Zero K Warm Again
  • 237. • Activity (Optional) Red Light Green Light Warm Again Again
  • 238. • Activity (Optional) Red Light Green Light Zero K Warm Again • Students line up in a safe place. • Teacher creates finish line • When teachers spins and says Zero K you must freeze / stop. • When teacher says Warm Again and spins you may try and advance to the finish.
  • 239. • Video Link. (Optional) Laws of Thermodynamics. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfxedEX76mo
  • 240.  Please create your own definitions for the following words based on the picture.  Convection  Conduction  Radiation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Note- This is not a new form of energy but a sidebar to radiant / thermal energy.
  • 241.  Please create your own definitions for the following words based on the picture.  Convection  Conduction  Radiation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Note- This is not a new form of energy but a sidebar to radiant / thermal energy. Indent these notes below radiant / thermal.
  • 242.  Please create your own definitions for the following words based on the picture.  Convection  Conduction  Radiation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 243.  Please create your own definitions for the following words based on the picture.  Convection  Conduction  Radiation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 244.  Please create your own definitions for the following words based on the picture.  Convection  Conduction  Radiation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 245.  Please create your own definitions for the following words based on the picture.  Convection  Conduction  Radiation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 246.  Please create your own definitions for the following words based on the picture.  Convection  Conduction  Radiation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 247.  Please create your own definitions for the following words based on the picture.  Convection  Conduction  Radiation Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 248.  Convection: Vertical circulation in which warm rises and cool sinks. Flow of heat by this circulation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 249. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 250. • Which colored arrows are incorrect based on the convection current patterns and plate movements below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 251. • Answer! The blue arrows. The plates should be moving toward each other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 252. • Answer! The blue arrows. The plates should be moving toward each other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 253. “Oh-no!” “We are trying it again.”
  • 254. • Try Again! Which colored arrows are incorrect based on the convection current patterns and plate movements below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 255. • Answer! The purple arrows should be diverging instead of converging. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 256. • Answer! The purple arrows should be diverging instead of converging. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 257. “Oh-no!” “We are trying it one more time.”
  • 258. • Try Again! Which colored arrows are incorrect based on the convection current patterns and plate movements below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 259. • Answer! The light blue arrows should be diverging instead of converging. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 260. • Answer! The light blue arrows should be diverging instead of converging. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 261.  Conduction: The movement of heat from one molecule to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 262.  Conduction: The movement of heat from one molecule to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 263.  Conduction: The movement of heat from one molecule to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 264.  Conduction: The movement of heat from one molecule to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Heat transfer is the transfer of energy by means of photons in electromagnetic waves.
  • 265.  Conduction: The movement of heat from one molecule to another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Heat transfer is the transfer of energy by means of photons in electromagnetic waves. Heat Transfer. Learn more at… http://www.wisc- online.com/Objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=sce304
  • 266. • Advection: The transfer of energy from one location to another from moving an object containing energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 267. • Advection: The transfer of energy from one location to another from moving an object containing energy Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 268. • Activity sheet available. Temperature and Conduction.
  • 269. • Activity! Each table group will get two clear containers filled with water. – Teacher will place two colored ice cubes (frozen water with food coloring) into each container. – One container has a heavy chain frozen in it so that the block of ice will sink. – Place both into the water at the same time and record a picture of each with description in your journal.
  • 270. • In fluids, such as water and air, convection is a more efficient method of heat transfer than conduction. – Conduction was at work in both, it transferred less heat than convection which was visible as the colored water moved around the container.
  • 271. • Activity / Demonstration (Optional) Tea-Bag Rocket. Convection Current – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_st7NWnNtoY
  • 272. • Activity Sheet Available: Conduction Again
  • 273. • Please record the following spreadsheet into your journal. 3 x 16 Minutes Wax Paper Cup Temp (C) Styrofoam Cup Temp (C) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  • 274. • Activity! Conduction – Place a styrofoam cup and wax paper cup into two similar containers. – Place weights into each cup so the container cannot float. – Place thermometers in each cup at the same place. – Teacher to pour 100 ml of boiling water into graduated cylinders and then into container (not into cup with weights). • Caution! Water will be very hot. – Record temperature of each on spreadsheet.
  • 275. • Activity Sheet Available: Conduction Again
  • 276. • Activity Sheet Available: Conduction Again
  • 277. • Questions. – Which cup was the better insulator of heat? Please use data in your response. – Please measure the temperature of the water on the outside of each container? • Record this temperature in your journal and discuss your findings? “Where did the heat go?” – How does this activity demonstrate conduction?
  • 278. • Questions. – Which cup was the better insulator of heat? Please use data in your response.
  • 279. • Questions. – Which cup was the better insulator of heat? Please use data in your response. – The styrofoam cup was the better insulator of heat because it was ____ degrees cooler than the wax paper cup.
  • 280. • Questions. – Please measure the temperature of the water on the outside of each container? • Record this temperature in your journal and discuss your findings? “Where did the heat go?”
  • 281. • Questions. – Please measure the temperature of the water on the outside of each container? • Record this temperature in your journal and discuss your findings? “Where did the heat go?” – The water on the outside of the wax paper cup was cooler because the thermal energy was transferred into the cup through conduction.
  • 282. • Questions. – How does this activity demonstrate conduction?
  • 283. • Questions. – How does this activity demonstrate conduction? – This activity demonstrates conduction because thermal energy moved through the molecules in the cup. This is evident in the recorded temperature changes.
  • 284. • Demonstration (Optional) Gummy Plank – Teacher to set-up a thin metal plank that stretches over a candle. – Place several Gummy Bears in a line on the metal plank. • Do not place a Gummy Bear directly over candle. – Light candle and record time for each Gummy Bear to melt / fall from the plank.
  • 285.  Radiation: Energy that is radiated or transmitted in the form of rays, waves, or particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 286. • Please record the following spreadsheet into your journal. 3 x 16 Minutes Gravel Temp (C) Light Gravel Temp (C) (Dark) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  • 287. • Activity! Radiation and earthen materials. – Set-up two clear containers with gravel. – Place thermometers into gravel. – Set-up a lamp that emits sufficient light / heat and place over one gravel container. – Place other container nearby but not under the light. – Record the temperatures of each container every minute until temperature stabilizes.
  • 288. • Radiation Available Sheet
  • 289. Thermal Infrared and Light Waves travel out from light in all directions
  • 290. The energy waves strike the gravel and are absorbed.
  • 291. The visible light is converted into thermal infrared heat
  • 292. The gravel then conducts heat to the other pieces of gravel and thermometer.
  • 293. The gravel then conducts heat to the other pieces of gravel and thermometer.
  • 294. • Radiation Available Sheet
  • 295. • Radiation Available Sheet
  • 296. • Using a frying pan and oil to cook popcorn is a good example of conduction.
  • 297. • Using a frying pan and oil to cook popcorn is a good example of conduction.
  • 298. • Using a frying pan and oil to cook popcorn is a good example of conduction.
  • 299. • Using a hot air popcorn popper is a good example of convection.
  • 300. • Using a hot air popcorn popper is a good example of convection.
  • 301. • Using a hot air popcorn popper is a good example of convection.
  • 302. • Using a microwave to cook popcorn is a good example of radiation.
  • 303. • Using a microwave to cook popcorn is a good example of radiation.
  • 304. • Using a microwave to cook popcorn is a good example of radiation.
  • 305. Conduction Convection Radiation
  • 306. Conduction Convection Radiation
  • 307. Conduction Convection Radiation
  • 308. Conduction Convection Radiation
  • 309. Conduction Convection Radiation
  • 310. Conduction Convection Radiation
  • 311. Conduction Convection Radiation
  • 312. • Quiz Wiz! Word Bank: Convection, Conduction, or Radiation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 313. • Bonus! Who is this?
  • 314. • Answers to Quiz Wiz. Convection, Conduction, Radiation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 315. • Bonus! Who is this?
  • 316. • Bonus! Who is this?
  • 317. • Bonus! Who is this?
  • 318. • Bonus! Who is this?
  • 319. • Bonus! Who is this?
  • 320. • Bonus! Who is this?
  • 321.  Nuclear Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 322.  Nuclear Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 323. • Nuclear Energy: The energy that deals with the changes in the nucleus of an atom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 324. • Nuclear Energy: The energy that deals with the changes in the nucleus of an atom. – Nuclear energy is produced when the nuclei of two atoms join together (fusion) or when the nucleus of an atom splits apart (fission). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 325. • Nuclear Energy: The energy that deals with the changes in the nucleus of an atom. – Nuclear energy is produced when the nuclei of two atoms join together (fusion) or when the nucleus of an atom splits apart (fission). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 326.  Fusion – Nuclei join together  Fission – Nuclei break apart  Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 327.  Fusion – Nuclei join together  Fission – Nuclei break apart  Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 328.  Fusion – Nuclei join together  Fission – Nuclei break apart  Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 329.  Fusion – Nuclei join together  Fission – Nuclei break apart  Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 330.  Fusion – Nuclei join together  Fission – Nuclei break apart  Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 331.  Fusion – Nuclei join together  Fission – Nuclei break apart  Electrons are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 332.  Fusion – Nuclei join together  Fission – Nuclei break apart  Particles are released – radiation / heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 333. Nuclear Fusion. Learn more at http://www.atomicarchive.com/ Fusion/Fusion1.shtml
  • 334. Nuclear Fission. Learn more at… http://library.thinkquest.org/17940/text s/fission/fission.html
  • 335. • Which is Fusion? Which is Fission? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 336. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 337. • Fission Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 338. • Fission Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 339. • Fission Fusion Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 340. • Forms of Energy. – Learn more before the quiz. http://www.energyeducation.tx.gov/energy/se ction_1/topics/forms_of_energy/ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 341. O U N D
  • 342. O U N D H E M I C A L
  • 343. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T
  • 344. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C
  • 345. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C
  • 346. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C E C H A N I C A L
  • 347. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C E C H A N I C A L Can someone do it scary screaming?
  • 348. Can someone do it normal?
  • 349. O U N D
  • 350. O U N D
  • 351. O U N D H E M I C A L
  • 352. O U N D H E M I C A L
  • 353. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T
  • 354. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T
  • 355. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T
  • 356. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C
  • 357. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C
  • 358. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C
  • 359. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C
  • 360. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C
  • 361. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C E C H A N I C A L
  • 362. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C E C H A N I C A L
  • 363. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C E C H A N I C A L
  • 364. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C E C H A N I C A L E A T
  • 365. O U N D H E M I C A L A D I A N T L E C T R I C T O M I C E C H A N I C A L E A T T H E R M A L
  • 366. • Quiz Wiz – Name the form of energy from the list of 7. 3 will be used twice. – Some pictures may show more than one form of energy. A strong response will identify these slides. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 367. “These Quiz Wiz things are driving me crazy.”
  • 368. • Bonus #1) –What movie and character is this?
  • 369. • Bonus - Fusion or Fission or Neither
  • 370. • Answers to the Quiz Wiz 1-10 Forms of Energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  • 371. • Bonus #1) –What movie and character is this?
  • 372. • Bonus – Back to the Future (1985) • Doctor Emmett Brown (Christopher Lloyd)
  • 373. • Bonus - Fusion or Fission or Neither
  • 374. • Bonus - Fusion
  • 375. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link:
  • 376. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Areas of Focus within The Matter, Energy, and the Environment Unit. There is no such thing as a free lunch, Matter, Dark Matter, Elements and Compounds, States of Matter, Solids, Liquids, Gases, Plasma, Law Conservation of Matter, Physical Change, Chemical Change, Gas Laws, Charles Law, Avogadro’s Law, Ideal Gas Law, Pascal’s Law, Viscosity, Archimedes Principle, Buoyancy, Seven Forms of Energy, Nuclear Energy, Electromagnet Spectrum, Waves / Wavelengths, Light (Visible Light), Refraction, Diffraction, Lens, Convex / Concave, Radiation, Electricity, Lightning, Static Electricity, Magnetism, Coulomb’s Law, Conductors, Insulators, Semi-conductors, AC and DC current, Amps, Watts, Resistance, Magnetism, Faraday’s Law, Compass, Relativity, Einstein, and E=MC2, Energy, First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics, Third Law of Thermodynamics, Industrial Processes, Environmental Studies, The 4 R’s, Sustainability, Human Population Growth, Carrying Capacity, Green Design, Renewable Forms of Energy.
  • 377. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  • 378. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  • 379. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  • 380. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link: