Minerals, Geology, Earth Science Lesson PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Geology Topics unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 6000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 14 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 12 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, 6 PowerPoint review Game, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus within The Geology Topics Unit: -Plate Tectonics, Evidence for Plate Tectonics, Pangea, Energy Waves, Layers of the Earth, Heat Transfer, Types of Crust, Plate Boundaries, Hot Spots, Volcanoes, Positives and Negatives of Volcanoes, Types of Volcanoes, Parts of a Volcano, Magma, Types of Lava, Viscosity, Earthquakes, Faults, Folds, Seismograph, Richter Scale, Seismograph, Tsunami's, Rocks, Minerals, Crystals, Uses of Minerals, Types of Crystals, Physical Properties of Minerals, Rock Cycle, Common Igneous Rocks, Common Sedimentary Rocks, Common Metamorphic Rocks.
This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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Minerals, Geology, Earth Science Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn.
  3. 3. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  4. 4. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  5. 5.  New Area of Focus: Rocks and Minerals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  6. 6.  New Area of Focus: Rocks and Minerals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7.  New Area of Focus: Rocks and Minerals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8.  New Area of Focus: Rocks and Minerals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9.  New Area of Focus: Rocks and Minerals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10.  Rock: A mass or grouping of minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. • Rocks can be big.
  12. 12. • Rocks can be big.
  13. 13. • Rocks can be big.
  14. 14. • Rocks can be little
  15. 15. • Used in buildings.
  16. 16. • Rocks are inorganic (non-living)
  17. 17.  Minerals are natural inorganic (non-living) solids that join together (crystals) to make unique compositions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • Minerals form from… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19. • Minerals form from… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • Minerals form from… • Cooling Magma Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Minerals form from… • Cooling Magma Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Minerals form from… • Cooling Magma • Minerals dissolved in liquid (liquid evaporates and the atoms left behind form crystals) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. • Activity! Making Crystals! Make more crystals at… http://chemistry.about.com/od/growingcrystals/ht/blsugarcry stal.htm
  24. 24. • Activity! Growing Crystals Demonstration. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • Activity! Growing Crystals Demonstration. – Add salt to boiling hot water until no more will dissolve. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. • Activity! Growing Crystals Demonstration. – Add salt to boiling hot water until no more will dissolve. – Soak a piece of cardboard in the salt solution, then set it in a sunny, dry spot to dry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27. • Activity! Growing Crystals Demonstration. – Add salt to boiling hot water until no more will dissolve. – Soak a piece of cardboard in the salt solution, then set it in a sunny, dry spot to dry. – The next day, using a stereoscope, draw the crystals that you see. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • Other crystal making experiments. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlYL4_cgCT U&feature=BFa&list=EC77ECE976316E5992
  29. 29. • Video Link! Growing Crystals – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KTrt38SYlc – The crystal solution was made by mixing 3 tablespoons ammonia, 3 tablespoons of Mrs. Stewart's laundry bluing (Prussian Blue), and 1 tablespoon of salt. The solution wicks up a cardboard tube that is cut to form branches (tree), allowing the crystals to grow on the surface. (several days) Learn more / demonstration at… http://www.scienceoffcenter.org/science/304-jet-stream-josh
  30. 30.  A crystal is a solid in which the atoms are arranged in a repeating pattern. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31.  A crystal is a solid in which the atoms are arranged in a repeating pattern. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. • Activity! Create a human crystal. – Teacher assigns students one at a time to create some form of atomic structure by laying on the floor and using your arms and legs to form atomic bonds in a crystal.
  33. 33. • Activity! Create a human crystal. – Teacher assigns students one at a time to create some form of atomic structure by laying on the floor and using your arms and legs to form atomic bonds in a crystal.
  34. 34. • Activity! Create a human crystal. – Teacher assigns students one at a time to create some form of atomic structure by laying on the floor and using your arms and legs to form atomic bonds in a crystal.
  35. 35. • Activity! Create a human crystal. – Teacher assigns students one at a time to create some form of atomic structure by laying on the floor and using your arms and legs to form atomic bonds in a crystal.
  36. 36. • Activity! Create a human crystal. – Teacher assigns students one at a time to create some form of atomic structure by laying on the floor and using your arms and legs to form atomic bonds in a crystal.
  37. 37. • Activity! Create a human crystal. – Teacher assigns students one at a time to create some form of atomic structure by laying on the floor and using your arms and legs to form atomic bonds in a crystal.
  38. 38. • Activity! Stare into this “magic” crystal, does it make you feel more powerful. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Activity! Stare into this “magic” crystal, does it make you feel more powerful. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • Do crystals have magic powers? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • Do crystals have magic powers? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Video! The Deadly Crystal Cave. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgUFb_l4DLE Naica Mine of Chihuahua, Mexico
  44. 44. • Quiz Wiz 1-10. (Oral / Hand signals) Is it a rock, mineral, or neither? 1-10 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. • Review! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • Review! – Rock: A grouping of minerals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Review! – Rock: A grouping of minerals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • Review! – Rock: A grouping of minerals – Mineral: Minerals are natural inorganic (non- living) solids that join together (crystals) to make unique compositions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Review! – Rock: A grouping of minerals – Mineral: Minerals are natural inorganic (non- living) solids that join together (crystals) to make unique compositions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Review! – Rock: A grouping of minerals – Mineral: Minerals are natural inorganic (non- living) solids that join together (crystals) to make unique compositions. – Neither: Not either; not one or the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Review! – Rock: A grouping of minerals – Mineral: Minerals are natural inorganic (non- living) solids that join together (crystals) to make unique compositions. – Neither: Not either; not one or the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • Review! – Rock: A grouping of minerals – Mineral: Minerals are natural inorganic (non- living) solids that join together (crystals) to make unique compositions. – Neither: Not either; not one or the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • Review! – Rock: A grouping of minerals – Mineral: Minerals are natural inorganic (non- living) solids that join together (crystals) to make unique compositions. – Neither: Not either; not one or the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • Table Salt (NaCl) under electron microscope on pretzel is a mineral.
  55. 55. • #11 Bonus: “Who am I?” “Any of my names count.”
  56. 56. • #11 Answer: “I am The Rock.” “My real name is Dwayne Johnson.”
  57. 57. • #11 Answer: “I am The Rock.” “My real name is Dwayne Johnson.”
  58. 58. • #11 Answer: “I am The Rock.” “My real name is Dwayne Johnson.”
  59. 59. • #11 Answer:
  60. 60. • #11 Answer:
  61. 61. • #11 Answer:
  62. 62. • #11 Answer:
  63. 63. • #11 Answer:
  64. 64. • #11 Answer:
  65. 65. • #11 Answer:
  66. 66. • #11 Answer:
  67. 67. • #11 Answer:
  68. 68. • #11 Answer:
  69. 69. • #11 Answer:
  70. 70. • #11 Answer:
  71. 71. • You can now complete this question.
  72. 72.  Uses of Minerals  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73.  Gems: Rare highly prized minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • Activity! How many gemstones can the class name?
  75. 75. • Do you know your birthstone? Write it down.
  76. 76. • If you don’t you have 20 sec. to record it.
  77. 77. • If you don’t you have 20 sec. to record it.
  78. 78. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • Diamond mine / pit in Africa
  80. 80.  Ores: Useful mineral that can be mined for profit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. • Would you buy any of these phones? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. • Would you buy any of these phones? – Columbite-tantalite (coltan) for short is one of the world's most sought-after minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • Would you buy any of these phones? – Columbite-tantalite (coltan) for short is one of the world's most sought-after minerals. – It’s heat resistant properties allow us to use our technology devices. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • In the Congo, kids your age are mining this mineral in horrible working environments. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • In the Congo, kids your age are mining this mineral in horrible working environments. – They are not in classrooms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • In the Congo, kids your age are mining this mineral in horrible working environments. – They are not in classrooms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Note: Mineral resources are from past geological processes and vary greatly in their distribution around the planet.
  87. 87. • The mining industry is also causing instability and war. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. • The mining industry is also causing instability and war. – This is the hidden cost of our things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89. • What if every time we turned on our devices we got a 10 sec. peek at what it is causing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90. • What if every time we turned on our devices we got a 10 sec. peek at what it is causing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • What if every time we turned on our devices we got a 10 sec. peek at what it is causing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92. • What if every time we turned on our devices we got a 10 sec. peek at what it is causing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. • What if every time we turned on our devices we got a 10 sec. peek at what it is causing? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. • What if every time we turned on our devices we got a 10 sec. peek at what it is causing? – Would we change our ways? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • What if every time we turned on our devices we got a 10 sec. peek at what it is causing? – Would we change our ways? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The Coltan mineral can be linked to roughly 5 million deaths since 1990.
  96. 96. Which big idea do ores and gems have to do with…?
  97. 97.  Six types of crystals.  -  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • Activity! Cut the Cheese
  99. 99. • Activity! Make the six crystal types out of cheese squares. – Use the plastic knives to cut the cheese into the correct crystal. (eye goggles required) – Place your cheese crystal onto a plate and label them correctly. • At the end, be prepared to switch with your neighbors and try to identify the various crystals types made from cheese.
  100. 100. • Activity! Make the six crystal types out of cheese squares. – Use the plastic knives to cut the cheese into the correct crystal. (eye goggles required) – Place your cheese crystal onto a plate and label them correctly. • At the end, be prepared to switch with your neighbors and try to identify the various crystals types made from cheese.
  101. 101.  Hexagonal.  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102.  Hexagonal.  (Four axis, three are equal in length and lie at an angle of 120° from each other). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  103. 103. • Hexagonal. – (Four axis, three are equal in length and lie at an angle of 120° from each other)
  104. 104. • Hexagonal. – (Four axis, three are equal in length and lie at an angle of 120° from each other)
  105. 105. • Hexagonal. – (Four axis, three are equal in length and lie at an angle of 120° from each other)
  106. 106. • Hexagonal. – (Four axis, three are equal in length and lie at an angle of 120° from each other)
  107. 107. • Trigonal – Part of Hexagonal.
  108. 108.  Triclinic:  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109.  Triclinic:  (3 axis, all unequal and none at 90° angles). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • Triclinic. (3 axis)
  111. 111. • Triclinic. (3 axis)
  112. 112. • Triclinic. (3 axis)
  113. 113. • Triclinic. (3 axis)
  114. 114.  Orthorhombic: Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115.  Orthorhombic: (All axis unequal in length, and 90° degrees from each other). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  116. 116.  Monoclinic:
  117. 117.  Monoclinic:  All axis unequal in length.
  118. 118.  Monoclinic:  All axis unequal in length.  Two of them are at right angles to each other, while the third lies at an angle other than 90°.
  119. 119. • Monoclinic. (All axis unequal in length)
  120. 120. • Monoclinic. (All unequal in length)
  121. 121. • Monoclinic. (All axis unequal in length)
  122. 122. • Monoclinic. (All axis unequal in length)
  123. 123.  Tetragonal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124.  Tetragonal. (Three axis, two are equal in length, one is unequal.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  125. 125. • Tetragonal. (Three axis, two are equal in length, one is unequal.)
  126. 126. • Tetragonal. (Three axis, two are equal in length, one is unequal.)
  127. 127. • Tetragonal. (Three axis, two are equal in length, one is unequal.)
  128. 128. • Tetragonal. (Three axis, two are equal in length, one is unequal.)
  129. 129.  Isometric / Cubic
  130. 130.  Isometric / Cubic  (All three axis are equal in length and at 90 degrees from each other.)
  131. 131.  Isometric / Cubic  (All three axis are equal in length and at 90 degrees from each other.)
  132. 132. Learn more about mineral crystals at… http://dave.ucsc.edu/myrtreia/crystal.html
  133. 133. • Activity! Cut the Cheese
  134. 134. • Activity! 50 / 50 challenge. – Each person in group gets a token / old cd. – Which table group can hold on to their tokens? (Prize at end?) – If you get a question incorrect then your table loses your token. Keep helping group. – Best of luck, you are on the honor system.
  135. 135. • 50 / 50 Challenge • True = Cover side False =
  136. 136. • 50 / 50 Challenge • True = Cover side False =
  137. 137. • 50 / 50 Challenge • True = Cover side False = Mirror side
  138. 138. • Practice Question. – This person is named Junction Seabear
  139. 139. • Practice Question. – This person is named Junction Seabear
  140. 140. • This crystal is hexagonal?
  141. 141. • This crystal is hexagonal? • False! Tetragonal (2 equal sides)
  142. 142. • This crystal is hexagonal?
  143. 143. • This crystal is hexagonal? • True! (3 equal sides)
  144. 144. • Which crystal is Isometric?
  145. 145. • Which crystal is Isometric?
  146. 146. • This crystal is tetragonal?
  147. 147. • This crystal is tetragonal? • False! Monoclinic (Not 90 )
  148. 148. • This is a monoclinic crystal?
  149. 149. • This is a monoclinic crystal? • True! All unequal sides.
  150. 150. • These are both tetragonal crystals?
  151. 151. • These are both tetragonal crystals? • True! 2 sides are equal.
  152. 152. • Which is a hexagonal crystal?
  153. 153. • Which is a hexagonal crystal?
  154. 154. • The other is tetragonal?
  155. 155. • The other is tetragonal? • False! Monoclinic (no equal sides)
  156. 156. • This is a isometric crystal?
  157. 157. • This is a isometric crystal? • True! (All equal and 90 ).
  158. 158. • This crystal is Isometric? i
  159. 159. • This crystal is Isometric? • False! Orthorhombic. (Unequal). i
  160. 160. • This is Orthorhombic?
  161. 161. • This is Orthorhombic?
  162. 162. • This is cubic / Isometric?
  163. 163. • This is cubic / Isometric?
  164. 164. • This is Hexagonal?
  165. 165. • This is Hexagonal?
  166. 166. • This is Cubic / Isometric?
  167. 167. • This is Cubic / Isometric?
  168. 168. • This is Triclinic?
  169. 169. • This is Triclinic?
  170. 170. • This picture is Triclinic?
  171. 171. • This picture is Triclinic?
  172. 172. • This is Hexagonal?
  173. 173. • This is Hexagonal?
  174. 174. • This is Isometric / Cubic?
  175. 175. • This is Isometric / Cubic?
  176. 176. • This is Tetragonal?
  177. 177. • This is Tetragonal?
  178. 178. • Salt forms Isometric Crystals.
  179. 179. • Salt forms Isometric Crystals.
  180. 180. • Do any table groups still have their cd? – Send a representative to the teacher with tokens.
  181. 181. • Follow-up! Growing Crystals Demonstration. – Add salt to boiling hot water until no more will dissolve. – Soak a piece of cardboard in the salt solution, then set it in a sunny, dry spot to dry. – The next day, using a stereoscope, draw the crystals that you see. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. Learn more about mineral crystals at… http://dave.ucsc.edu/myrtreia/crystal.html
  183. 183. • Video Link! Review from New York. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTDMb1TLf64
  184. 184. • Activity! Observing a rock with a magnification device to look for crystals. – Can you identify any of the minerals / crystals?
  185. 185. • You can now complete this question.
  186. 186.  Two main types of minerals  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187.  Silicate Minerals: Contains silica and oxygen. 75% of all minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188.  Silicate Minerals: Contains silica and oxygen. 75% of all minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189.  Silicate Minerals: Contains silica and oxygen. 75% of all minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190.  Silicate Minerals: Contains silica and oxygen. 75% of all minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191.  Silicate Minerals: Contains silica and oxygen. 75% of all minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192.  Silicate Minerals: Contains silica and oxygen. 75% of all minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Silicate is a chemical term for the group of a single atom of silicon surrounded by four atoms of oxygen, or SiO4
  193. 193.  Silicate Minerals: Contains silica and oxygen. 75% of all minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Silicate is a chemical term for the group of a single atom of silicon surrounded by four atoms of oxygen, or SiO4
  194. 194.  Silicate Minerals: Contains silica and oxygen. 75% of all minerals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Silicate is a chemical term for the group of a single atom of silicon surrounded by four atoms of oxygen, or SiO4
  195. 195. • Note for next slide!
  196. 196. • Note for next slide! – Igneous rocks are a type of rock that comes from cooled magma or lava.
  197. 197. • Note for next slide! – Igneous rocks are a type of rock that comes from cooled magma or lava. – This is the start to all types of rocks
  198. 198. • Characteristics of Igneous Rocks • Remember felsic magma / lava? – Felsic Igneous Rocks • Composition of Aluminum and Silicon • Low Density • Light in Color • Feldspars and Quartz Minerals
  199. 199. • Characteristics of Igneous Rocks • Remember felsic magma / lava? – Felsic Igneous Rocks • Composition of Aluminum and Silicon • Low Density • Light in Color • Feldspars and Quartz Minerals
  200. 200. • Characteristics of Igneous Rocks • Remember felsic magma / lava? – Felsic Igneous Rocks • Composition of Aluminum and Silicon • Low Density • Light in Color • Feldspars and Quartz Minerals
  201. 201. • Characteristics of Igneous Rocks • Remember felsic magma / lava? – Felsic Igneous Rocks • Composition of Aluminum and Silicon • Low Density • Light in Color • Feldspars and Quartz Minerals