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mobile usability

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Mobile Usability
    • 2. 1. What is different about mobile? Students mentioned:• Size• Gestures• Tapping• No hover effects• Context of use
    • 3. 2. What does/does not apply to mobile? Students mentioned:• Design process applies• Some design principles apply (e.g. Gestalt, visual hierarchy, grids)• Some design principles may not apply (e.g. navigation)
    • 4. Debate based on 2 readings• Nielsen’s guidelines for mobile usability: http://www.useit.com/alertbox/mobile- vs-full-sites.html• Josh Clark’s counterpoint: http:// www.netmagazine.com/opinions/nielsen- wrong-mobile• Josh Clark on Twitter: @globalmoxie
    • 5. Mobile usabilityHARD Web UX: Philosophy Process ? Principles
    • 6. Web UX PrinciplesMultiple column layoutsPersistent navigationContent vs. links/buttonsImages. Video. Flash.
    • 7. Platform
    • 8. Context
    • 9. Focus: TransACTION
    • 10. Important:PlanningInformation architectureWireframingEarly testing
    • 11. Resources
    • 12. @globalmoxie
    • 13. http://mobithinking.com/best-practices/a-three-step-guide-usability-mobile-webhttp://econsultancy.com/us/blog/6610-seven-enlightening-mobile-usability-presentations
    • 14. iPad = smartphone??? • Read–tap asymmetry for websites, with content that was large enough to read but too small to tap. We did see some examples across a few websites that were designed to work well on tablets, with bigger touchable areas. For example,Virgin Americas reservation page let users touch anywhere in the entire table cell containing a desired departure, as opposed to having to touch the much smaller area represented by the radio button (or even its label). • Websites worked fairly well in the standard iPad browser as long as users didnt have complex tasks; focusing on reading and looking at pictures or video was relatively easy. (If your service requires substantial interaction, consider an app instead of a site.) • Touchable areas were too small in many apps, as well as too close together, increasing the risk of touching the wrong one. • Accidental activation due to unintended touches again caused trouble, particularly in apps lacking a Back button. • Low discoverability, with active areas that didnt look touchable. • Users disliked typing on the touchscreen and thus avoided the registration process.http://www.useit.com/alertbox/ipad.html