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Community Division Q4 2009
 

Community Division Q4 2009

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    Community Division Q4 2009 Community Division Q4 2009 Presentation Transcript

    • PresenTense Community Division Report January 2010 Here is a summary of the Community Division’s activities for October– December 2009, and upcoming plans for January-March 2010.
    • Goals of the Community Division
      • To lower the barrier to entry for young Jews to allow them to voice their ideas in the global conversation on Jewish identity and innovation in the digital age
      • To empower young Jews with the tools and resources they need to broadcast their voice, their initiatives, and their creativity, to ensure they have the support they need to be successful
      • To facilitate conversations on innovation in the Jewish world, and to foster connections between innovators in the same fields
      • To build local communities that support and foster innovators and Jewish leaders, where some will go on to be Fellows, writers, etc.
    • Assumptions
      • Continued demand for involvement in conversations on Jewish identity and innovation in the Digital Age and Creative Zionism
      • Ability (technical, financial) to foster conversations , online in addition to in-print
      • Demand for local PT involvement in the global conversation in the form of Circles and other activities
      • Community members’ interest in growing into leadership roles both due to this demand, and because they aspire to be part of the PT Team serving the Jewish People, with the privileges and responsibilities that that entails
      • Animating local communities will foster innovators who will go on to be active in PT in other ways
      • PT can provide tools and resources valuable to local innovators
      • PT can sustain the infrastructure necessary for a effective and functional global community, including effective communication, successful community organizing, and delegation and management of roles and responsibilities
    • Program Content: What we’re seeking to achieve
      • To sustain ongoing Circles and other PT activities (minimum monthly) in New York, Chicago, Boston, and Tel Aviv, producing in-depth explorations that lead to action through the generation of pioneer guides and handbooks (one per quarter)
      • To use the PT Network to build local leadership, ultimately generating City Teams who will drive the above activities as well as identify local innovators
      • To provide mentors for young Jews interested in our target fields through a mentorship program
      • To generate an ongoing conversation through the quarterly Magazine (online or combination online/in-print)
      • To facilitate connections between innovators in the same field and foster action through taskforce steering committees
    • 1. Metric: City Stats : In how many cities is PT active? Projected: 6 Cities (New York, Chicago, Jerusalem, LA, Tel Aviv, Denver) Actual: 5 Cities (New York, Chicago, Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and Boston) Planned vs. Actual Programming Projected: 10 events 6 Launch events 1 FutureTense 1 social event 2 Circles How many events take place? Actual: 11 events 2 launch events (NY, Jerusalem) 1 FutureTense (NY) 1 social event (NY) 5 Circles (NY held 2, Boston, Tel Aviv held 2) 2 Brainstorms (Chicago, NY)
      • 2 launch events
      • NY December 1: “Entitled or Enlightened: Conversation on young Jews and Philanthropy” cosponsored by ROI and BYFI: 32 attendees
      • Jerusalem November 12: Panel on Philanthropy: 24 attendees
      • 1 FutureTense
      • NY December 17: Social Justice and Education cosponsored by JESNA: 11 attendees
      • 1 social event
      • NY November 18 bar night: 10 attendees
      • 5 Circles
      • NY December 19 “Jewish Heroes” Havdalah event: 10 attendees
      • NY January 14 “What is Jewish Food?”: 10 attendees
      • Boston Circle December 7 Jewish Education and Peoplehood: 6 attendees
      • Tel Aviv (Hebrew) December 17: 8 attendees
      • Tel Aviv (English) January 19 “Memory in Israeli culture”: 11 attendees
      • 2 Brainstorms
      • Chicago January 6: 11 attendees
      • NY December 14: 12 attendees
      Planned vs. Actual Programming Events held:
    • Metric: Networking Stats: How many mentorships have been established? How many times have they met? What relationships developed as a result of PT activities?
      • Mentorship
      • Planned: 8 mentorship matches were ongoing at the beginning of last quarter
      • Actual: There is an ongoing re-evaluation of the mentorship project , in which research is being done to produce a new mentorship program.
      Planned vs. Actual Programming Steering Committee Planned : To expand the Philanthropy Steering Committee to 1 additional field, Digital Media, with at least 12 Committee members. Actual: There is 1 new Steering Committee, Digital Media, with 15 Committee members.
    • Metric: Conversation Stats : How many people have been involved in PT Conversations, either in-print or online? How many people are following our conversations?
      • PT9 engaged 95 contributors :
      • 12 Steering Committee members
      • 9 artists and PT photographers
      • 23 writers
      • 5 online-only writers
      • 18 editors
      • 23 fellows and interns (Institute Insert)
      • 5 interviewees
      • So far PT10 engaged 94 contributors including:
      • 15 Steering Committee members
      • 3 artists and PT photographers
      • 37 writers with pitched ideas
      • 7 submitters of ideas (non-writers)
      • 18 editors
      • 8 attendees of brainstorms (not otherwise contributing to the issue)
      • 6 interviewees
      Planned vs. Actual Programming
      • Planned: 150 participants
      • Actual: 94 participants
      • Reason for discrepancy: We planned to have community members engage with the issue online, but the new website has been delayed in its launch. We do intend to engage our community in the newly-launched website in the upcoming quarter.
      Planned vs. Actual Programming
    • Metric: Pioneer Stats: How many past Fellows/Magazine contributors have remained engaged through PT Community activities? How many Handbooks were produced to further the community’s collective action?
      • Fellow engagement
      • Planned : To engage 10 fellows each in the Digital Issue, mentorship opportunities, and the Yazam Fund
      • Actual :
      • Digital Issue: 4 contributors are past fellows/interns
      • Yazam Fund: 7 fellows have submitted proposals for events; so far, 1 event of a past fellow has occurred.
      • Mentorship: Mentorship program is not currently in operation as it is being reevaluated.
      • Reason for discrepancy: Needs to further assess how we can best create match between needs of fellows and available opportunities.
      • Handbooks
      • Future Plans: Creation of a PresenTense Handbook and Cookbook
      Planned vs. Actual Programming
      • In the upcoming quarter, the Community Division will reevaluate the following underlying assumptions in expanding PT programming to new cities and maintaining it in existing cities:
      • Demand for involvement - a need to reexamine the target market of PT programming, and to ensure that members of that target market are those who attend city programming
      • Interest in growing into leadership roles How to cultivate city leadership
      • Flow of participants from participants in events to becoming active in PT in other ways to participating again in the community
      • What tools and resources are we providing which are valuable to local innovators
      • Sustaining the infrastructure and programming remotely – though there was a Tel Aviv Circle successfully organized remotely
      • What is the narrative of the PT Volunteer – what motivates them to be involved
      Challenges in City Operations
    • :
      • The PresenTense Community needs a strong cohort of City Leaders who are trained, connected, and inspired. To achieve this, the Community Division plans to convene 20 City Leaders in a Summit Shabbaton.
      • The Summit will include:
      • Training in grassroots activism and PresenTense methodologies
      • Building actionable workplans that will lay out goals which City Leaders will achieve in their cities
      • Peer-led learning and training, and networking between City Leaders
      • Learning about the larger vision of PresenTense, Creative Zionism and social entrepreneurship
      • Participation from other organizational leaders from the Jewish community, who will get to know and find synergy with those in the PT network
      Future Plans: City Leaders’ Summit
      • Future Plans: Mentorship
      A new mentorship program is being planned, to be launched in the Spring 2010. The PresenTense Mentorship Program will exponentially expand the possibilities in how young Jewish innovators in our network can develop meaningful relationships with each other – and find more people and information to work with. The PresenTense Mentorship Program will launch with two pilot groups, one in New York and one in Jerusalem, made up of working cohorts of ten mentors and ten mentees in each location. The Program will incorporate opportunities for group-building activities such as speed-dating-style networking events and team skillbuilding workshops, which will enable participants to be exposed to the maximum number of opportunities for learning and networking. In addition, participants will engage in individual work, where mentorship relationships will further their work as well as personal development through skillbuilding, networking, and troubleshooting challenges that arise in the mentee's work.
      • City:
      • To identify, engage and train 20 City Leaders in a City Leaders’ Summit
      • To form the City Leaders into City Teams which can steer the development of local PT community
      • To run 10 events in 5 cities (New York, Chicago, Boston, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem), including Circles, FutureTense, Launch Parties for PT10, Brainstorming for PT11
      • Networking:
      • To launch 2 mentorship groups (New York and Jerusalem), of 10 mentors and mentees each
      • To engage the 15 members of the Digital Committee in the production and launch of PT10, to continue to engage the 12 members of the Philanthropy Committee in networking opportunities
      • Conversation:
      • To engage 150 users in our online space as a result of the Digital Issue
      • Pioneering:
      • To engage 10 past fellows in the Digital Issue
      • To engage 10 past fellows in the Yazam Fund activities
      • To recruit 2 fellows to the Institute this summer from the PT Community.
      Future Plans:
    • Budget
      • Yazam Fund/ City Events: $1500 ($150 per event for 10 events) Last quarter: 2 events ($300)
      • City Leaders’ Summit: $27,000 requested (food, location, flights, materials, transportation) (new)
      • PresenTense Handbook: $10,000 requested (printing/shipping, fellowship stipend) (new)
      • Mentorship Program: $1000 requested (2 launch events, local mentoring programming) (new)