White Paper: Enabling the Perforce Administrator via Mobile Device
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

White Paper: Enabling the Perforce Administrator via Mobile Device

on

  • 559 views

White Paper for the AMD presentation by Xavier Galvez

White Paper for the AMD presentation by Xavier Galvez

Statistics

Views

Total Views
559
Views on SlideShare
559
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

White Paper: Enabling the Perforce Administrator via Mobile Device White Paper: Enabling the Perforce Administrator via Mobile Device Document Transcript

  •   Xavier  Galvez   Advanced  Micro  Devices,  Inc.   ©  2011    Abstract    Granting  access  and  creating  accounts  on  the  Perforce  depots  at  AMD  is  a  24/7  operation  with  engineers  working  around  the  world.  Given  the  highly-­‐sensitive  nature  of  the  source  code  that  resides  on  these  depots,  access  to  areas  is  tightly  regulated  and  may   s  whim.  The  administrators  that  create  accounts  and  grant  access  to  these  areas  should  be  enabled  to  perform  these  tasks  wherever  they  are,  and  they  may  not  necessarily  have  access  to  a  desktop  or  have  the  means  to  log  in  to  the  company  network  remotely.  By  creating  an  interface  accessible  by  web  browser  with  a  predefined  list  of  actions,  our  administrators  are  able  to  perform  these  tasks  securely  by  mobile  device.      Background    In  order  to  fully  appreciate  the  solution  in  place,  some  context  must  be  given  on  the  problem.  The  discussion  touches  on  the  structure  of  the  permissions  in  the  protection  table,  the  centralized  authorization  process,  and  the  breadth  of  the  organization.  The  evolution  of  the  solution  is  then  discussed,  and  its  simplicity  may  be  a  boon  to  other  organizations  with  limited  resources.  A  basic  level  of  Perforce  administration  may  be  required  to  understand  the  terms  used,  but  most  of  the  workflow  will  be  appreciated  by  an  ardent  reader.    Access  Permissions    Source  code  is  version-­‐controlled  on  a  Perforce  server,  and  access  to  the  source  is  dictated  by  a  set  of  (list),  view  their  contents  (read)  or  modify  the  files  (write).    Permissions  on  this  particular  Perforce  server  are  set  up  using  one  level  of  groups  and  one  level  of  subgroups  fo groupsabstraction  levels  also  make  it  easier  to  visualize  how  users  are  given  access  to  areas  of  the  depot.  Permissions  are  not  given  directly  to  the  users,  i.e.,  lines  in  the  protection  table  do  not  explicitly  specify  a  user  account.  This  is  done  to  align  with  best  practices.1  The  protection  table  specifies  mostly  access  groups;  to  minimize  subgroups,  occasional  exceptions  are  granted  to  some  teams.  This  is  further  illustrated  in  the  following  figures  on  the  next  page.                                                                                                                            1    2007.  <http://www.perforce.com/perforce/conferences/us/2007/presentations/jcreasy_p4admin_2007_paper.pdf>  
  •    read  group  ACC_rel  *  //depot/rel/...  write  group  bm_rel  *  //depot/rel/...  write  group  ACC_rel  *  //depot/rel/8.10/...  (added  by  automation  as  release  is  branched)  read  group  ACC_rel  *  -­//depot/rel/*/access.txt  write  group  REG_rel  *  //depot/rel/*/access.txt  read  group  ACC_main  *  //depot/main/...  read  group  ACC_mercury  *  //depot/main/mercury/...  write  group  bm_mercury  *  //depot/main/mercury/...  (main/mercury  =  promoted  stg/mercury/src)  write  group  ACC_mercury  *  //depot/stg/mercury/src/...  write  group  ACC_mercury  *  //depot/stg/mercury/doc/...  write  group  nda_mercury  *  //depot/stg/mercury/nda/...  write  group  reg_mercury  *  //depot/stg/mercury/access.txt  read  group  ACC_venus  *  //depot/main/venus/...  write  group  bm_venus  *  //depot/main/venus/...  (main/venus  =  promoted  stg/venus/src)  write  group  ACC_venus  *  //depot/stg/venus/src/...  write  group  ACC_venus  *  //depot/stg/venus/doc/...  write  group  nda_venus  *  //depot/stg/venus/nda/...  write  group  reg_venus  *  //depot/stg/venus/access.txt  super  group  grp_admins  *  //...       Figure  1.  Protection  table.    The  protection  table  in  Figure  1  above  refers  to   ,  each  of  which  is  composed  of  subgroups  respectively  as  seen  in  Figure  2:      Access  Group   Description   Subgroups  ACC_rel   Subgroups  that  have  access  to  release  branches.   grp_northamerica,  grp_israel,  grp_china,   grp_releasemanagement  REG_rel   Subgroups  that  regulate  write  access  into  a  release  branch  via  Work  ID.   grp_releasemanagement  ACC_main   Subgroups  that  have  read  access  to  mainline.   grp_northamerica,  grp_israel,  grp_china  ACC_mercury   Subgroups  allowed  to  work  on  the  Mercury  component.   grp_northamerica  ACC_venus   Subgroups  allowed  to  work  on  the  Venus  component.   grp_northamerica,  grp_israel,  grp_china     Figure  2.  Access  groups.    The  protection  table  in  Figure  1   -­‐  in  Figure  3:    High-­‐Level  Team   Description  bm_rel   Users  that  promote  from  mainline  to  release;  normally  just  automation.  bm_mercury   Users  that  promote  from  stg/mercury  to  main;  normally  team  leads  or  build  managers  of  Mercury.  bm_venus   Users  that  promote  from  stg/venus  to  main;  normally  team  leads  or  build  managers  of  Venus.  reg_mercury   Users  that  regulate  write  access  into  stg/mercury  via  work  ID.  reg_venus   Users  that  regulate  write  access  into  stg/venus  via  Work  ID.  nda_mercury   Privileged  users  with  nda/mercury  access.  nda_venus   Privileged  users  with  nda/venus  access.     Figure  3.  High-­‐level  teams.    The  access  groups  in  Figure  2  refer  to  the   -­‐  in  Figure  4  below:    Low-­‐Level  Team   Description  grp_releasemanagement   The  release  management  team.  grp_northamerica   Developers  in  North  America.  grp_israel   Developers  in  Israel.  grp_china   Developers  in  China.  grp_admins   Perforce  administrators.     Figure  4.  Low-­‐level  teams.   2    
  •  Additional  notes  regarding  the  permission  structure:     A  user  will  always  be  a  member  of  a  low-­‐level  team  (i.e.,  one  of  the  grp_  groups).   Users  in  high-­‐level  teams  (bm_,  nda_,  reg_)  also  belong  to  a  grp_  group.  (Exception:  bm_rel)   The  access.txt  file  is  an  additional  mechanism  that  works  with  the  submit  trigger;  this  controls   check-­‐ins  based  on  a  Work  ID  found  in  the  changelist  description.    Access  groups  and  teams  can  have  designated  owners  that  may  grant  existing  users  access  to  the  associated  area,  without  having  administrative  (i.e.,  superuser)  rights.  When  a  Perforce  account  is  created,  the  user  is  assigned  to  one  of  the  low-­‐level  teams  by  default.  This  enables  the  user  to  have  access  to  designated  areas  off  the  bat.  Additional  access  can  then  be  granted  by  owners  of  the  high-­‐level  teams  on  request,  or  superusers  can  grant  these  privileges.  And  here  lies  the  crux  of  the  problem  we  would  like  to  solve.    Challenges    AMD  does  not  have  one  team  handling  administrative  duties  for  all  Perforce  servers,  but  rather  the  company  has   that  exist  throughout  the  organization.  Multiple  departments  have  their  own  cluster  of  servers  and  depots  that  are  maintained  by  their  own  respective  administrative  team.  This  decentralization  enables  each  admin  team  to  be  experts  of  the  process,  depot  structure  and  file  contents  of  that  specific  department.  With  that,  each  department  has  specific  rules  on  how  content  residing  on  their  specific  repository  is  accessed.    Some  departments  are  smaller  than  others;  notably,  these  smaller  departments  have  teams  that  reside  in  the  same  time  zone.  Given  this  scenario,  the  superusers  or  group  owners  in  these  departments  can  grant  access  rights  to  a  requestor  during  regular  working  hours.  Also,  a  properly  resourced  admin  team,  or  a  team  using  a  properly  structured  superuser  +  group  owner  model  in  granting  privileges,  is  able  to  fulfill  such  requests  within  a  reasonable  time.    However,  other  departments  may  not  have  this  luxury.  One  department  at  AMD  in  particular  has  teams  covering  almost  all  time  zones  making  creating  accounts  and  granting  access  a  24/7  operation.  Another  restriction  in  this  department  is  its  strict  enforcement  on  code  exposure;  given  the  sensitivity  of  the  content,  only  the  administrative  team  is  allowed  to  grant  access.  Alas,  the  administrative  team  with  the  depth  of  knowledge  of  the  file  hierarchical  structure  and  the  access  to  export  control  laws  for  properly  discerning  permissions  exists  in  only  one  geographical  area,  and  as  such,  authorization  approval  is  centralized.  Lastly,  the  admin  team  is  not  fully  resourced  as  a  support  center,  but  is  also  tasked  with  other  ongoing  projects  and  meetings  that  make  responding  to  requests  somewhat  difficult.    Creating  User  Accounts    Creating  a  Perforce  user  account  in  this  department  started  with  calling  the  traditional  Perforce  command  p4  user  -­i  (and  filling  in  the  appropriate  fields)  from  the  command-­‐line.  To  make  user  creation  a  less  cumbersome  task,  a  script  was  written  that  encapsulated  this  command;  the  script  simply  required  a  list  of  parameters  (such  as  an  email  address  and  groups  the  user  belonged  to),  generated  a   3     View slide
  • strong,  random  password,  and  then  sent  an  email  to  the  user  with  all  the  information  needed  to  access  the  Perforce  depot.  The  sequence  of  events  was  where:     1) The  user  requested  access  to  the  Perforce  depot  by  email.   2) The  Perforce  admin  received  the  email,  validated  the  request,  and  called  the  script   newuser.exe  to  create  the  account.   3) The  script  sent  an  email  to  the  user  with  the  information  required  to  access  the  depot.    Eventually,  the  script  was  extended  so  that  prior  to  the  creation  of  the  account,  contractors  and  users  with  special  access  rights  were  sent  an  email  with  the  terms  and  conditions  for  accessing  the  files  in  the  depot.  Once  the  terms  were  accepted  (by  clicking  on  a  link  in  the  email),  the  account  was  activated  and  the  user  received  the  access  information.    A  list  of  the  parameters  required  by  this  script  newuser.exe  can  be  seen  in  Figure  5.  Calling  the  script  from  the  command-­‐line  without  any  parameters  described  the  usage  syntax  and  inputs.      >  newuser.exe  newuser  1.8.5    Usage:  newuser  -­user  Username  -­fname  FullName  -­email  Email  -­site  Site  -­ports  Server:Port1[,Server:Port2]                  -­groups  Group1[,Group2]  [-­outrule]    Username        -­  The  users  login.  (required)  FullName        -­  The  full  name  of  the  user.  (required)  Email              -­  The  users  AMD  email  address.  (required)  Site                -­  The  site  the  user  is  at  (e.g.,  TO).  Server:Port  -­  The  server  and  port  for  access.  (e.g.,  perforce:1666)  Group              -­  The  groups  the  user  needs  to  be  added  to.  Outrule          -­  Send  email  with  terms  and  conditions  of  the  account.       Figure  5.  Parameters  for  script  newuser.exe.    The  script  made  the  task  of  creating  users  much  easier,  but  it  had  a  couple  shortcomings  that  are  inherent  in  any  published  binary:     Newer  versions  of  the  script  to  address  bugs  or  add  new  features  had  to  be  recompiled  and   packaged  each  time.   Diligence  in  deployment  was  necessary  to  ensure  that  all  users  in  the  admin  team  had  the  latest   and  greatest  version.    This  was  not  a  serious  problem,  but  was  simply  an  annoyance  that  was  easily  rectified  by  a  reminder  email,  a  scheduled  script  (i.e.,  cron  job)  that    the  latest  version  of  the  binarydiligence  to  do  this  manually.  However,  this  scenario  provided  an  opportunity  to  devise  a  web-­‐based  solution  instead.    The  team  had  its  own  web  server  on  the  intranet  that  was  used  to  publish  documents  that  were  checked  into  the  Perforce  depot.  This  mechanism  allowed  users  to  examine  files  that  were  deemed  safe  for  general  consumption  and  did  not  require  a  Perforce  account  to  access.  Leveraging  this  web  server,  a  secure  area  was  created  specifically  for  the  Perforce  admins.     4     View slide
  • Within  this  secure  area,  the  newuser.exe  binary  was  converted  to  a  CGI  script  accessible  only  to  the  admins.  The  web-­‐based  model  addressed  the  limitations  of  using  the  published  binary  model,  and  even   easily  implemented  before:     Newer  versions  of  the  script  were  available  the  moment  these  were  uploaded  to  the  server.   Deployment  was  instantaneous,  as  admins  had  access  to  the  latest  version  immediately.   Experimental  versions  of  the  script  co-­‐existed  with  production  versions  and  could  easily  be   tested  by  residing  in  relatively  the  same  location.   Validation  of  the  inputs  was  now  possible,  as  the  web  interface  was  able  to  check  for  spelling   mistakes  against  a  live  database  (that  was  updated  with  employee  info)  or  against  the  Perforce   server  itself  (for  existing  users  or  groups).   The  script  was  now  OS-­‐independent,  as  a  web  browser  was  simply  needed  to  access  the  script.    A  simple  web  interface  was  sufficient  to  provide  the  functionality  that  the  previous  binary  offered.  Its  simplicity  also  meant  quick-­‐loading  times  (which  turned  out  to  be  a  boon  for  a  serendipitous  discovery  that  followed  shortly,  to  be  discussed).  Not  much  time  was  invested  to  get  this  running,  as  the  objective  was  to  have  a  functional  replacement  in  place.  A  screen  cap  of  the  web  interface  can  be  seen  in  Figure  6.         Figure  6.  Screen  cap  of  the  web  interface.   5    
  • The  parameters  required  by  the  original  binary  newuser.exe  can  now  be  input  more  intuitively  through  the  new  web  browser  interface.  The  CGI  script  was  written  in  Perl  to  leverage  the  source  of  the  original  binary  (which  was  also  written  in  Perl,  although  the  internal  mechanism  has  since  been  re-­‐written).  The  Perl  script  generated  the  HTML  files  on  the  fly,  and  with  the  CSS  files,  comprised  the  web  page.  The  full  name,  login,  email  address,  groups  and  ports  were  still  required  parameters,  but  checkboxes  and  validation  checks  made  the  interface  less  error-­‐prone.    After  the  administrator  filled  in  the  required  parameters,  the  script  then  processed  the  inputs,  generated  a  strong  password,  and  then  sent  this  off  to  the  user  via  email.  The  script  called  an  instance  of  the  command-­‐line  client  p4.exe  that  is  installed  on  the  server  to  perform  the  task;  other  implementations  of  this  model  may  call  APIs  such  as  P4Perl  or  P4Python  as  well.    The  administrator,  however,  still  needed  to  be  on  the  AMD  domain  in  order  to  access  the  web  server.  The  admin  would  need  to  be  in  front  of  a  desktop  computer  or  laptop  while  in  the  office.  If  the  admin  was  not  within  the  vicinity,  accessing  the  domain  remotely  via  VPN  (i.e.,  virtual  private  network)  was  required.  But  was  there  a  way  to  untether  the  admin?    Wireless  Solutions    AMD  runs  a  BlackBerry  Enterprise  Server  behind  a  firewall;  one  of  the  modules  included  in  a  BlackBerry  Enterprise  Server  is  the  BlackBerry  MDS  Connection  Service.  This  mechanism  allows  wireless  applications  on  BlackBerry  devices  to  connect  to  tservers  or  web  servers,  and  to  do  so  securely.2      Perforce  admins  at  AMD  are  equipped  with  Blackberry  devices.  These  were  originally  issued  for  admins  to  monitor  the  health  of  the  Perforce  servers,  where  administrators  were  quickly  alerted  of  any  anomalies  that  would  occur  via  automated  notifications.  As  this  resource  was  already  available,  no  other  infrastructure  was  required  for  the  Perforce  admin  to  access  the  web  server  hosting  the  user  creation  script.    By  keeping  the  HTML  simple,  the  web  page  can  be  quickly  loaded  into  the  BlackBerry  devices.  The  web  page  works  wonderfully  even  on  the  antiquated  browser  found  in  the  BlackBerry  8700r,  as  seen  in  Figure  7.  With  this  discovery,  the  Perforce  admins  are  able  to  conduct  administrative  tasks  on  their  mobile  devices.                                                                                                                          2  BlackBerry  MDS  Connection  Service  <http://docs.blackberry.com/en/admin/deliverables/7335/BB_MDS_Connection_Service_267709_11.jsp>   6    
  •     Figure  7.  A  BlackBerry  8700r  accessing  the  web  page.    Another  wireless  option  available  to  Perforce  admins  would  be  accessing  the  web  page  on  an  iOS  device  such  as  an  iPhone  or  iPad.  Users  equipped  with  one  of  these  are  able  to  do  so  by  setting  up  a  VPN  on  their  iOS  device.  This  allows  the  administrator  to  communicate  private  information  securely  over  a  public  network,  but  only  if  the  VPN  server  hosted  by  the  organization  supports  one  of  the  protocols  and  authentication  methods  that  works  with  iOS.3    The  Perforce  admin  is  able  to  use  a  variety  of  iOS  devices  to  access  this  web  page.  Figure  8  is  a  screen  cap  of  how  this  page  looks  when  accessed  from  an  iPad.                                                                                                                            3  iOS:  Supported  protocols  for  VPN  <http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1288>   7    
  •     Figure  8.  Screen  cap  of  the  web  page  on  an  iPad.    Security  and  Risks    Security  over  wireless  devices  is  achieved  via  secure  VPN  for  users  accessing  the  web  page  by  iOS  device,  and  through  the  different  mechanisms  put  in  place  by  the  BlackBerry  Enterprise  Solution  (e.g.,  strong  data  and  encryption  key  protection).4    HTTP  (Hypertext  Transfer  Protocol)  is  not  secure  and  can  be  exploited  for  man-­‐in-­‐the-­‐middle  and  eavesdropping  attacks.  The  web  server  runs  in  HTTPS,  which  is  a  combination  of  ordinary  HTTP  over  SSL/TTL  (encrypted  Secure  Sockets  Layer  or  Transport  Layer  Security  connection).  This  mechanism  encrypts  the  HTTP  message  prior  to  transmission  and  decrypts  the  message  upon  arrival,  which  adds  a  layer  of  security  when  the  web  page  is  accessed  by  browser.    The  web  page  itself  is  not  published  to  the  internal  development  community  within  the  company,  and  is  only  known  to  Perforce  admins.  The  script  that  generates  the  HTML  itself  also  does  a  check  to  ensure  that  only  the  authorized  Perforce  admins  are  allowed  to  access  the  URL  to  the  web  page.                                                                                                                        4  BlackBerry  Technical  Overview  <http://docs.blackberry.com/en/admin/deliverables/7225/FTO_X_Gold.pdf>   8    
  • If  a  malicious  non-­‐administrator  is  able  to  access  the  web  page,  then  the  risks  can  still  be  minimized  by  having  a  limited  list  of  actions  that  can  be  performed.  This  prevents  any  extended  damage  that  can  be  done.  Currently,  the  production  version  of  the  web  page  provides  the  following  functionality:     Create  a  new  user,  given  inputs  such  as  full  name,  email  address  and  groups.   Displa s  permissions  (using  p4  protects  and  p4  groups).   Add  an  existing  user  to  currently  existing  groups  to  extend  access.   Remove  the  user  from  a  group  to  limit  or  prevent  access.   Change  the  password  of  an  existing  user.    The  implications  of  being  able  to  provide  an  abstraction  to  the  Perforce  commands  but  made  accessible  via  web  browser,  and  then  through  mobile  devices,  are  endless.  Extended  features  can  be  added  for  additional  administrative  tasks,  such  as  checking  the  status  of  the  Perforce  servers  and  viewing  submitted  changelists  and  jobs.  However,  these  should  be  deliberated  carefully,  as  not  all  commands  may  be  suited  for  a  web  interface.  Also,  limited  actions  lower  the  risk  of  damage  by  a  non-­‐admin.    Other  Solutions    The  P4Web5  application  is  more  suited  for  the  developer  that  uses  Perforce,  and  not  for  the  admin  that  wishes  to  perform  administrative  tasks  through  a  web  browser.  The  interface  of  P4Web  may  also  be  a  little  bit  too  content-­‐intensive  for  a  mobile  device.    The  P4Scout6  application  runs  natively  on  Android  and  iOS  devices,  and  allows  the  administrator  to  check  the  status  of  the  servers.  P4Scout  addresses  a  different  need  altogether.    Conclusion    The  solution  presented  is  actually  a  very  simple  mechanism.  It  took  advantage  of  existing  resources  that  the  Perforce  team  had  at  its  disposal,  and  the  latest  web  programming  technologies  were  not  necessary  to  get  it  up  and  running.  This  resulted  in  quick  development  and  fast  deployment.    Having  the  mechanism  run  in  a  web  page  +  mobile  device  model  allows  a  much  richer  feature  set,  as  the  only  limitation  is  the  discretion  of  the  Perforce  admin  team  on  the  administrative  tasks  that  they  choose  to  support.  New  capabilities  can  be  easily  added  and  deployed.  B  Compiling  for  different  platforms  is  not  needed,  and  the  administrator  will  feel  at  home  accessing  the  web  page  on  a  desktop  as  accessing  this  from  a  mobile  device  since  the  interface  will  remain  relatively  the  same.    being  tethered  to  a  desktop  or  laptop,  freeing  up  the  most  valuable  resource  anyone  could  ask  for:  time.                                                                                                                        5  P4Web  Release  2010.1  User  Guide  <http://www.perforce.com/perforce/r10.1/manuals/p4web/help/index.html>  6   http://blog.perforce.com/blog/?p=1047>   9