Citizen Charter..The power of people is stronger than the people in power......
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Citizen Charter..The power of people is stronger than the people in power......

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The POWER of PEOPLE is stronger than the People in power............PPT on citizen charter uploaded by T J Joseph Mob-9447464502

The POWER of PEOPLE is stronger than the People in power............PPT on citizen charter uploaded by T J Joseph Mob-9447464502

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Citizen Charter..The power of people is stronger than the people in power...... Citizen Charter..The power of people is stronger than the people in power...... Presentation Transcript

  • Citizen Charter.
      • A mysandesham presentation.
      • Presented by
      • T. J JOSEPH
      • DEPUTY TAHSILDAR,
      • Kottayam. Kerala.
      • India.
    • .
    They Expect MORE…….
  • The need for a citizen charter arises from the dissatisfaction of the customer Citizen charter
  • Citizen Charter.
      • The concept of Citizen’s Charter enshrines the trust between the service provider and its users.
  • Expectation of the Customer People Expect Good service---- -------But few are willing to give it.
  • Citizen Charter Is For Good Governance.
      • The Charter should be an effective tool to ensure transparency and accountability and should help deliver good governance if implemented vigorously by the government departments.
  • Good Governance
      • Transparency
    • Accountability
    • Responsivenes
  • Transparency.
    • “ Right to information.- Transparency reduces uncertainity and un predictability in out come as relevant facts are available to citizens.
  • Transparency
    • “ The purpose of a government is to make it easy for people to do good and difficult to do evil”
    • - Sir Gladstone
  • Accountability To my customer, I may not have the Answer, But I will find it. I may not have the time, But I will make it.
  • RESPONSIVENESS
      • As public services are funded by citizens, either directly or indirectly through taxes, they have the right to expect a particular quality of service that is responsive to their needs and is provided efficiently
  • Value for money
    • About 1.87% of Indians govern 1090 million people! This comes to about US$147 billion or nearly 25% of India’s Gross domestic product or GDP!
    • Are Indian citizens getting their moneys worth?
  • Cost of Governance.
    • By the 790 politicians at the Center,
    • the 4120 in the 35 States and
    • the 18.7 million employees of the Central and State Govts.
    • use about Rs.2200 crore per day
    • or Rs. 760,000 crore per year,
    • both on capital & revenue acount.
  • Citizen Charter is for effective Service delivery.
    • “ Implementation of citizen charter ensures better service delivery.
  • Equity
    • Non Discriminatory with respect to quality and quantity of services delivered.
  • Inclusiveness
    • “ Marginalised sections of the society or very poor should not be byepassed.
  • Efficiency.
    • “ Speed,technology based applications and cost effective service delivery to to maximise citizens’ satisfaction and optimise the use of available public resources.
    • Eg- ATM
  • Efficiency.
    • “ Quality in a service or product is what you put into it ……..
    • It is what the customers get out of it……………..
    • .
  • Effectiveness
    • “ Service delivery should bring desired outcomes and makes significant changes to the peoples’ lives as envisaged by the policy.
  • Expectation of the Customer If we don’t take care of our customers, some one else will--------
  • Go Extramile There are no traffic jams along extramile -------
  • A simple, but powerful rule Always give people more than they expect to get-----------
  • Every complaint is a gift. Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning.
  • Sustainablity.
    • “ Service delivery by the state should have a long term commitment to ensure service delivery.
  • Participation
    • Democracy is of the people, for the people and by the people. Citizens must play an active role.
    • As President John F. Kennedy said, “ask not what the country has done for you, but what you have done for the country”.
  • Citizen Charter for Participation
    • “ The punishment suffered by the wise who refuse to take part in the government, is to suffer under the government of bad men”
    • - Plato
  • Citizen Charter is for Citizen Centric Administration.
    • “ Implementation of citizen charter is part of citizen centric administration.
  • Citizen-centric Administration
    • Reform of Institutions.
    • Citizen charters.
    • Right to information.
    • Grievance redressal.
    • Attitudinal Changes.
    • Performance Management Frame works
    • Monitoring, Evaluation and feed back.
    • Social Audit.
  • Citizen Charter is for Right to information
  • Citizen Charter.
      • A Citizen’s Charter is the expression of an understanding between citizens and service provider with respect to the quantity and quality of services the former receive in exchange for their taxes. 
  • 6 Principles
    • 1.  P ublished Standards;
    • 2.    O penness and Information;
    • 3.     C hoice and Consultation;
    • 4.      C ourtesy and Helpfulness;
    • 5.      R edress when things go wrong;
    • 6 .     V alue for money ;
  • Citizen
      • The term ‘Citizen’ in the Citizen’s Charter implies the clients or customers whose interests and values are addressed by the Citizen’s Charter .
  • The Customer A Customer is the most important visitor in our premises. He is not dependent on us. We are dependent on him. He is not an interruption on our work. He is the purpose of it. He is not an outsider to the institution. He is the part of it. We are not doing him a favor by serving him. He is doing a favor by giving an opportunity to do so.
  • To my customer……. I may not have the Answer, But I will find it. I may not have the time, But I will make it.
  • Go Extramile You are serving a customer, not a life sentence, Learn to enjoy your work.
  • Basic Rules Rule .1 Customer is always right. Rule. 2 In case of doubt, refer rule 1.
  • Citizen Charter.
      • It is should be an effective tool to meet the right to information of the citizens
  • Change in mindset.
      • It is also intended to help change the mindset of the public official from someone with power over the public to someone with the right sense of duty in spending the public money
  • Whether CC is legally enforceable
    • No. The Citizen’s Charter is not legally enforceable and, therefore, is non-justiciable. However, it is a tool for facilitating the delivery of services to citizens with specified standards, quality and time frame etc. with commitments from the Organisation and its clients.
  • Origin of CC
      • It was first implemented in the United Kingdom by the Conservative Government of John Major in 1991
    • INTER NATIONAL
    • SCENE
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • Cc-Inter national scene
      • The UK’s Citizen’s Charter initiative aroused considerable interest around the world and several countries implemented similar programmes.
  • Cc-Inter national scene
      • 1992
      • France
      • Service Charter. ,.
  • Cc-Inter national scene
      • 1992
      • Belgium
      • Public Service Users Charter ,
  • Cc-Inter national scene
      • 1992
      • Spain
      • THE QUALITY OBSERVATORY ,
  • Cc-Inter national scene
      • 1993
      • MALAYSIA
      • THE CLIENT CHARTER ,
  • Cc-Inter national scene
      • 1993
      • PORTUGAL
      • The quality Charter in Public services
  • Cc-Inter national scene
      • 1994
      • Jamaica
      • The Citizen Charter
  • Cc-Inter national scene.
      • 1994
      • Jamaica
      • The Citizen Charter.
  • Cc-Inter national scene.
      • 1995.
      • Canada.
      • Service Standards Initiative.
  • Cc-Inter national scene
      • 1997.
      • Australia.
      • Service Charter.
    • INDIAN
    • SCENARIO
    CITIZEN CHARTER 24/5/97
  • Cc-The Indian Scenario
      • At a Conference of Chief Ministers of various States and Union Territories held on 24 May, 1997 in New Delhi, presided over by the Prime Minister of India, an Action Plan for Effective and Responsive Government” at the Centre and State levels was adopted.
  • Cc-The Indian Scenario
      • One of the major decisions at that Conference was that the Central and State Governments would formulate Citizen’s Charters , starting with those sectors that have a large public interface
  • Role of DARPG
      • D epartment of A dministrative R eforms and P ublic G rievances coordinates the efforts to formulate and operationalise Citizen’s Charters in Central Government, State Governments and UT Administrations.
      • It provides guidelines for formulation and implementation of the Charters as well as their evaluation
  • www.goicharters.nic.in
      • A comprehensive website on Citizen’s Charters in Government of India has been developed and was launched by the DARPG on 31 May, 2002. This contains the Citizen’s Charters issued by various Central Government Ministries/Departments/Organisations
  •    Compendium on Citizen’s Charters in Government of India
      • DARPG brought out a Compendium of abridged versions of all Citizen’s Charters in Government of India in a book as well as in CD form on 14 May, 2003. The Compendium contains the operative standards and quality of services proposed to be provided as also the public grievance redressal mechanism as committed in the Citizen’s Charters .
  • The 9 principles of the Citizen’s Charter movement as originally framed(1998) were :
      • i.       Set standards of service;
      • ii.      Be open and provide full information;
      • iii.     Consult and involve;
      • iv.     Encourage access and the promotion of choice;
      • v.      Treat all fairly;
      • vi.     Put things right when they go wrong;
      • vii.     Use resources effectively;
      • viii.    Innovate and improve;
      • ix.      Work with other providers .
  •    The approach to CC.
      • 1. A partnership between people and the Government;
      • 2. Citizen’s Charter is not just a concept, but a programme of action;
      • 3. They are a part of democratic reforms;
      • 4. Citizen’s Charters give people orientation and customer focus;
      • 5. Citizen’s Charters are a pro-active approach to good governance;
      • 6. Political parties, administrators, and even judiciary must encourage Citizen’s Charters .
    • PRINCIPLES.
    CITIZEN CHARTER
    • 6 ESSENTIAL
    • COMPONENTS
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • 6 COMPONENTS :-
          • ( i)      Vision and Mission Statements;
          • (ii)      Details of business transacted by the organisation;
          • (iii)      Details of clients;
          • (iv)     Details of services provided to each client group;
          • (v)      Details of grievance redressal mechanism and how to access it; and
          • (vi)     Expectations from the clients.
    • Expectation from the client
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • ‘ expectations from the clients ’
      • Primarily an adaptation of the UK model, the Indian Citizen’s Charter has an additional component of ‘ expectations from the clients’ or in other words ‘ obligations of the users’
  • Evaluation of Citizen’s Charters
      • As on March, 2008, 1700 Citizen’s Charters had been formulated by the Central /state GovernmentGovernment Departments/Organisations . Evaluation of Citizen’s Charters was conducted by the DARPG
    • MAJOR FINDINGS
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • Major findings-1
      • In majority of cases Charters were not formulated through a consultative process;
  • Major findings-2
      • service providers are not familiar with the philosophy,
      • goals and
      • main features of the Charter;
  • Major findings-3
      • )    In none of the departments evaluated, had adequate publicity been given to the Charters.
      • In most Departments, the Charters were only in the early stages of implementation
  • Major findings-4
      • )    No funds were specifically earmarked for awareness generation on Citizen’s Charter or for orientation of the staff on various components of the Charter.
    • PROBLEMS
    • FACED
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • Problems faced-1
      • . The consultation process was minimal or largely absent. It, thus, became one of the routine activities of the organisation and had no focus;
  • Problems faced-2
      • In many cases, the concerned staff were not adequately trained and sensitised;
  • Problems faced-3
      • Transfers and reshuffles of concerned officers at the crucial stages of formulation/implementation of the Citizen’s Charter.
  • Problems faced-5
      •      
      • Awareness campaigns to educate clients about the Charter were not conducted systematically
  • Problems faced-6
      •     The concept behind the Citizen’s Charter was not properly understood. Information brochures, publicity materials, pamphlets produced earlier by the organisations were mistaken for Citizen’s Charters.
    • LESSONS LEARNT
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • Lessons Learnt-1
      • As with any new effort, the Citizen’s Charter
      • initiative is bound to be looked at initially with
      • skepticism by bureaucrats as well as citizens.
      • Hence, an effective awareness campaign amongst
      • all the stakeholders at the initial stage is
      • essential to overcome this skepticism. These
      • awareness campaigns should be designed and
      • delivered innovatively and effectively.
    implementation
  • Lessons Learnt-2
      • The issuance of Citizen’s Charter will not change overnight the mindset of the staff and the clients, developed over a period of time.   Therefore, regular, untiring and persistent efforts are required to bring about attitudinal changes .
    implementation
  • Lessons Learnt-3
      •    A new initiative always encounters barriers and misgivings from the staff. There is a natural resistance to change, particularly among the cutting-edge staff.
      • Involving and consulting them at all the levels of formulation and implementation of Citizen’s Charter will go a long way in overcoming this resistance and will made them an equal partner in this exercise.
    implementation
  • Lessons Learnt-4
      • )    Instead of trying to reform all the processes at once and encounter massive resistance, it is advisable to break the tasks into small components and tackle them one at a time.
    implementation
  • Lessons Learnt-5
      •     The charter initiative should have a built-in mechanism
      • for monitoring,
      • evaluating and
      • reviewing
      • the working of the Charters, preferably through an outside agency
    implementation
    • DEVELOPMENT
    • Of
    • CHARTER MARK
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • Development of Charter Mark
      • )     In 1992, the UK Government introduced Charter Mark , a scheme for recognising and encouraging excellence in public service
  • Development of Charter Mark
      • To win a Charter Mark, an organisation has to demonstrate excellence against the following nine Charter Mark criteria which correspond to the principles of public service delivery, namely,
      • (i)     Performance Standards;
      • (ii)      Information and openness;
      • (iii)     Choice and Consultation;
      • (iv)     Courtesy and helpfulness;
      • (v)      Putting things right;
      • (vi)     Value for money;
      • (vii)    User satisfaction;
      • (viii)   Improvements in service quality; and
      • (ix)     Planned improvements and innovations.
  • Development of Charter Mark
      • In India, the DARPG has identified a professional agency to develop an appropriate Charter Mark scheme. This scheme will encourage and reward improvement in public service delivery with reference to the commitments and standards notified in the Charter.   This would not only give a sense of achievement to the organisation to be awarded the Charter Mark, but also promote a spirit of competitiveness amongst various organisations that have issued Citizen’s Charters and generate awareness among citizens
  • The Kerala Scene.
      • In Kerala, Government had issued orders for implementing the Citizen’s Charter and had drawn up detailed guidelines on its implementation G.O. (Ms.) 30/99/P&ARD dt.21/12/2009
    • FORMATION OF TASK FORCE
    FORMULATION OF CITIZEN CHARTER
  • 1.Formation of a Task Force
      •   1-2 representatives - top management.
      • 2- 3 Representatives - Middle Management.
      • 2 – 3 Representatives - cutting-edge level.
      • Representatives - Staff Associations.
      • 5. 2 - 3 Representatives - Citizen’s/ Client’s . 
  • Duties of Task Force
      • (i) Identification of all clients and services. 
      • (ii) Determining the standards of outputs/ services etc.  
      • (iii) Preparation of a draft Charter and obtaining suggestions. 
      • (iv) Modification of draft Charter to include suggestions
      • (v)  Submission of draft Charter for consideration by the ‘Core Group
      • (vi)  Modification of the draft Charter on the basis of suggestions/ observations made by the Core Group on Citizen’s Charter. 
      • (vii) Seeking the approval of Minister In-Charge  
      • (viii)  release/ publish the Charter in public domain. 
  • Drafting of CC
      • Simple Language.
      • Easy to read- font size (12).
      • Introduction.
      • Vision and mission statement.
      • About the institution-Location .
      • About the staff- what to expect from them.
      • Commitment to Standards (Time frame, Quality ).
      • Details of Business transacted by the Organisation;
      •    Details of clients;
      •    Details of services provided to each client group;
      •    Details of grievance redressal mechanism and
      • how to access it; and
      •   Expectations from the clients.
      • Feed back.
  • Drafting of CC
      • Simple Language.
      • Easy to read- font size (12).
      • Introduction.
      • Vision and mission statement.
      • About the institution-Location .
      • About the staff- what to expect from them.
      • Commitment to Standards (Time frame, Quality ).
      • Details of Business transacted by the Organisation;
      •    Details of clients;
      •    Details of services provided to each client group;
      •    Details of grievance redressal mechanism and
      • how to access it; and
      •   Expectations from the clients.
      • Feed back.
  • Ingradients of a good CC
      • 1      Focus on Customer Requirements;
      • ii.       Simple Language;
      • iii.      Service standards;
      • iv.      Effective Remedies;
      • v.       Training;
      • vi.      Delegation;
      • vii.     Feedback Mechanism;
      • viii.     Close Monitoring;
      • ix.      Periodic Review
  • Ingredients of a good CC
      • .
  • 1. Introduction.
      • .
  • 2. Vision
      • Ultimate direction in which the Organisation seek to move.
  • 3. Mission
      • Specific objective which drive the organisation in tune with vision.
  • 3. Location
      • Location of the organization or institution.
  • 4. Identification of services
      • All sevices should be clearly mentioned.
  • 5. Identification of levels of services
      • This would enable the citizen the levels at which they can access a specific service and not to waste their time and energy in approaching wrong levels.
  • 6. Identification of Client groups
      • The charter should list out the services of each client group and the commitment of each of such services.
  • 7. Specification of time limit for each service.
      • This would save the orgn from undue expectation.
  • 8. Specification of time frame at each level.
  • 9. Specification of service quality standards.
      • Clear commitment on service delivery standards such as
      • Timeliness,access,accuracy, reliability,affordability, responsiveness, fairness,sensitivity and courtesy.
  • 10. Clear information about procedures to access service.
      • .
  • 11. Clear information about contact points to obtain service benefits.
  • 12. Clear information about IFC
      • .
  • 13. Clear information about PG Cell
      • .
  • 14. Clear information about PG Cell
      • Time frame for PG redress,
      • Time frame for acknowledgement.
      • Time frame for response,
      • Time frame for systematic review, Time frame for outcome of review.
  • 15. Procedures for inviting suggestions
      • Time frame for processing suggestions.
      • Time frame for review of suggestions,
      • Time frame for outcome of review of suggestions.
  • 16. Procedures for inviting suggestions
      • Time frame for processing suggestions.
      • Time frame for review of suggestions,
      • Time frame for outcome of review of suggestions.
  • 17. Information about online Charter
  • 18. Information about Right to information.
  • 18. Information about Right to information.
      • Information about information handbook.
    • implementation
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • Implementation of Citizen’s Charter
      • 1        Ensuring wide publicity of the Charter. Conduct awareness campaigns. Putting up the Charter on the Department/ Organisation’s website and sending copies to all stakeholders and their representative associations etc. 
      • 2        Organising training programmes, workshops etc. for orientation and motivation of officers and staff of the Organisation for aligning the workforce to the commitments made in the Charter so as to ensure proper implementation of the Citizen’s Charter.  
    • MONITORING
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • Monitoring of Citizen’s Charter  
      • 1 Set up an Integrated Performance Monitoring System and monitor Organisation’s performance vis-à-vis commitments made in the Charter on a regular basis and keep the Head of the Department informed. 
      • 2 Publish data relating to performance of the Organisation, vis-à-vis, commitments made in the Citizen’s Charter, in the Annual Report and share with citizens/ clients using appropriate media. 
    • EVALUATION
    CITIZEN CHARTER ATTITUDE
  • Evaluation and Review of Citizen’s Charter  
      • 1        Arrange for regular internal and external evaluation of implementation of Citizen’s Charter in the Organisation and assessment of the level of satisfaction among citizen/ client. Report to the Head of the Department/ Organisation on a regular basis. 
      • 2       Based on the feedback/ assessment/ evaluation, taking necessary steps for review/ revision of the Citizen’s Charter. 
      • 3        Ensuring that activities related to formulation/ implementation of Citizen’s Charter form a part of the Annual
  • Evaluation  
      • i.     Evaluation must be both internal and external;
      • ii.    Evaluation and monitoring are necessary for improving standards of services;
      • iii.   Regular evaluation and monitoring of the performance standards builds confidence among the users of the service and standards may be made more acceptable;
      • iv.   Evaluation can be quarterly, half-yearly or yearly.  Evaluation must be done at least once in a year;
      • v.    Evaluation report must be widely publicized within and outside the organization;
      • vi.   Evaluation enables process review and re-engineering of services provided by Government Departments;
      • vii.  Evaluation and monitoring is better done through computerization  and online access of information to the top management to help decision making;
      • viii.  Evaluation must provide a reward system for services of staff who provide excellent service.
  • External Evaluation  
      • External Evaluation has the following advantages
      • i.     Improves transparency;
      • ii.    Validates Internal Evaluation;
      • iii.   Helps comparison with International Standards;
      • iv.   Makes known customer expectations;
      • v.    Helps in fixing correct user charges and to measure willingness to pay;
      • vi.   It can be undertaken by involving NGOs, professional bodies, consumer activists, academic bodies, research institutions etc.;
      • vii.  Voluntary channel for external evaluation can also include newspaper columns as sources;
      • viii.  An appropriate Report Card system can be developed.
    • Complaint redressal system
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • Remember  
      •        Without a good complaint redressal system, Citizen’s Charters have no effect. Departments should establish highly credible & responsive complaints procedures and redressal systems.
  • Right attitude to Complaints  
      •    •  Listening sympathetically to people who have felt a cause to complain;
      • •  Recognizing that complaints handling is an integral part both of good service and customer care and not a nuisance;
      • •  Understanding the benefits of good complaints handling and consequences of poor complaints handling and welcome complaints as an opportunity;
      • •  Putting things right for the citizen and to learn the lesson and improve service .
  • Complaints  
      •     i.     Be easily accessible and well publicized;
      • ii.     Be simple to understand and use;
      • iii.    Be speedy, with established time limits for action and keeping people informed of progress;
      • iv.    Be fair, comprehensive and impartial in its investigation;
      • v.     Be confidential, to maintain the confidentiality of both the staff and the complainant;
      • vi.    Be informative, providing information to top management so that services can be improved;
      • vii.   Set out clearly the volume of complaints, broken down by different categories;
      • viii.   Include an analysis of response time;
      • ix.    Inform the complainant of the proposed action .
  • Complaints   redressal system
      •    i.   Acknowledge complaints;
      • ii.   Designate a location to receive complaints;
      • iii.  Develop a system for record keeping;
      • iv.  Process and record complaints;
      • v.  Investigate and analyze the complaints;
      • vi.  Keep the customer informed of the progress;
      • vii. Periodically analyze the complaints and improve the process..
  • Redress Options
      •    A recommended menu of redress options could be:
      • i.     An apology;
      • ii.    An explanation;
      • iii.   Assurance that the same thing will not happen again, backed up by action and monitoring;
      • iv.   Action taken to put things right;
      • v.    Financial compensation .
  • The Gift formula
      •     
      • Say “Thank you”;
      • ii.    Explain why you appreciate the complaint;
      • iii.   Apologize for mistake(s);
      • iv.   Promise to do something about the problem immediately;
      • v.    Ask for necessary information;
      • vi.   Correct the mistake – promptly;
      • vii.  Check customer satisfaction;
      • viii.  Prevent future mistakes.
    • INFORMATION AND FACILITATION COUNTERS (IFC)
    CITIZEN CHARTER
  • IFC
      • An integral aspect of administrativereforms is related to the speedy and easy access of information to the public on the services and activities of Government and the development of an appropriate Management Information System in Government
      • offices
  • IFC
      • Provide information regarding services, schemes and procedure through
      • brochures,
      • booklets,
      • reports etc.
      • Provide information regarding position of waiting lists and applications through computer screens updated every day and through computerized query to Departmental data base.
  • IFC
      • Provide information regarding such matters as bill payments, registrations, land/house allotment etc. over the phone or personally to the public.
      • Forms which are to be utilized for various procedures should be available at the Facilitation Centre, even if the processing is to be done elsewhere .
      • Receive complaints, issue acknowledgment slips indicating the section dealing with the complaints .
  • IFC
      • A sufficiently Senior Officer is to man the Facilitation Centres with appropriate orientation, capable of speaking English and local language for handling customers and knowledge of use of computers. Time limits and other details should be notified through display boards at the Facilitation Centres for completion of various procedures and for disposal of cases
  • IFC
      • A sufficiently Senior Officer is to man the Facilitation Centres with appropriate orientation, capable of speaking English and local language for handling customers and knowledge of use of computers. Time limits and other details should be notified through display boards at the Facilitation Centres for completion of various procedures and for disposal of cases
  • IFC
      • Ensure easy accessibility to Facilitation Centres for the average citizen through publicity regarding the location and hours of access.
      • It will also be helpful to utilise the Interactive Voice System where feasible for enquiry response.
  • .
      • T.J Joseph
      • Adhikarathil.
      • Kottayam.