User experience. What is it anyway?

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User Experience (UX) can be confusing, unless you are a practitioner. This introductory presentation defines user experience, shows you how to do it, how to evaluate web sites for their user experience and names the components of user experience.

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User experience. What is it anyway?

  1. User Experience So, what is it, anyway?
  2. The definition of UX UX encompasses all aspects of the end-user’s interaction with an organization, its services, and its products. – Jakob Neilsen
  3. My definition of UX The discipline of UX is the process of optimizing the interactions between a person and an organization, its products, web sites/apps.
  4. User Needs Components of UX Jessica Ivins, jessicaivins.net/blog
  5. Business Goals Components of UX Jessica Ivins, jessicaivins.net/blog
  6. Technical Constraints Components of UX Jessica Ivins, jessicaivins.net/blog
  7. User Needs Business Goals Technical Constraints Combine the Components Jessica Ivins, jessicaivins.net/blog
  8. User Needs Business Goals Technical Constraints UX UX, the Sweet Spot! Jessica Ivins, jessicaivins.net/blog
  9. The Goal of UX Create an easy-to-use, pleasing & valuable product, web site/app useful desirableusable valuable findable creditable accessible Peter Morville, semantidstudios.com
  10. UX is an Iterative Process From this… …To this. Rama, WikiMedia Commons Apple, apple.com
  11. Is it easy-to-use, pleasing, valuable? useful desirableusable valuable findable creditable accessible
  12. Is it easy-to-use, pleasing, valuable? useful desirableusable valuable findable creditable accessible
  13. Is it easy-to-use, pleasing, valuable? useful desirableusable valuable findable creditable accessible
  14. Is it easy-to-use, pleasing, valuable? useful desirableusable valuable findable creditable accessible
  15. UX: How to do it. 1. Get to know your users. 2. Include user needs when deciding how a site/app looks, behaves, and what it allows a user to do. User Needs Business Goals Technical Constraints UX
  16. Techniques for getting to know your users:
  17. Techniques for getting to know your users: • Interview them.
  18. Techniques for getting to know your users: • Interview them. • Observe them.
  19. Techniques for getting to know your users: • Interview them. • Observe them. • Survey them.
  20. Techniques for getting to know your users: • Interview them. • Observe them. • Survey them. • Conduct Usability testing.
  21. Techniques for getting to know your users: • Interview them. • Observe them. • Survey them. • Conduct Usability testing. • Conduct Card Sorting.
  22. Techniques for getting to know your users: • Interview them. • Observe them. • Survey them. • Conduct Usability testing. • Conduct Card Sorting. • Interpret Search Analytics.
  23. User Needs Business Goals Technical Constraints UX How do we include user needs in the decision-making process?
  24. The Elements of User ExperienceJesse James Garrett Surface: Visual design Visual design Skeleton: Interface design Navigation design Structure: Interaction design Information architecture Scope: Functional specifications Content requirements Strategy: User needs Business objectives Web as: Software Interface Hypertext Content
  25. The Elements of User Experience Surface: Visual design Visual design Skeleton: Interface design Navigation design Structure: Interaction design Information architecture Scope: Functional specifications Content requirements Strategy: User needs Business objectives Web as: Software Interface Hypertext Content
  26. The Elements of User Experience Surface: Visual design Visual design Skeleton: Interface design Navigation design Structure: Interaction design Information architecture Scope: Functional specifications Content requirements Strategy: User needs Business objectives Web as: Software Interface Hypertext Content
  27. The Elements of User Experience Surface: Visual design Visual design Skeleton: Interface design Navigation design Structure: Interaction design Information architecture Scope: Functional specifications Content requirements Strategy: User needs Business objectives Web as: Software Interface Hypertext Content
  28. The Elements of User Experience Surface: Visual design Visual design Skeleton: Interface design Navigation design Structure: Interaction design Information architecture Scope: Functional specifications Content requirements Strategy: User needs Business objectives Web as: Software Interface Hypertext Content
  29. The Result UX practices increase users’ satisfaction while meeting business objectives within technical constraints. User Needs Business Goals Technical Constraints UX
  30. The Take-Aways 1. Get to know your users. 2. Work together on UX. 3. Build easy-to-use, pleasing & valuable sites/apps 4. Use the adjectives to evaluate UX: useful desirableusable valuable findable creditable accessible
  31. Bibliography UX The Elements of User Experience: User-Centered Design for the World Wide Web, 2nd Edition, by Jesse James Garrett. ©2010, New Riders. The Design of Everyday Things, by Don Norman, Neilsen Norman Group. ©2013, Basic Books. Designing for Behavior Change, Dr. Stephen Wendel, Hello Wallet. ©2013, O’Reilly Media, Inc. Sketching User Experiences: the Workbook, By Saul Greenberg, Sheelagh Carpendale, Nicolai Marquardt, Bill Buxton. ©2012, Elsevier, Inc. The User Experience Team of One: A Research and Design Survival Guide, By Leah Buley. ©2013, Rosenfeld Media. Innovating for People: Handbook of Human-Centered Design, by the LUMA Institute. ©2012, LUMA Institute. Content Strategy Content Srategy for the Web, by Kristina Halvorson. ©2010, New Riders/ Pearson Publications. Managing Enterprise Content: A Unified Content Strategy, by Ann Rockley, Charles Cooper. ©2012, O’Reilly Media. The Accidental Taxonomist, by Heather Hedden. ©2010, Information Today. Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content that Works, by Janice (Ginny) Redish, 2nd Edition. ©2012, Elsevier. The Web Content Strategist’s Bible: The Complete Guide to a New and Lucrative Career for Writers of All Kinds, by Richard Sheffield. ©2013, CLUEfox Publishing. Information Architecture Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, 3rd Edition, by Peter Morville & Louis Rosenfeld. ©2013, O’Reilly Media. Information Architecture: Blueprints for the Web, 2nd Edition, by Christina Wodtke and Austin Govella. ©2009, New Riders. Interaction Design Evil by Design: Interaction designs to lead us into temptation, by Chris Nodder. ©2013, Wiley & Sons, Inc. Microinteractions, Dan Saffer, Smart Design. ©2014, O’Reilly Media. Designing Interfaces, by Jenifer Tidwell. ©2010, O’Reilly Media. Search Search Patterns: Design for Discovery, Peter Morville, Jeffrey Callender. ©2010, O’Reilly Media. Search Analytics for Your Site: Conversations with Your Customers, by Louis Rosenfeld. ©2011, Rosenfeld Media. Designing the Search Experience: The Information Architecture of Discovery, by Tony Russell-Rose, Tyler Tate. ©2013, Elsevier, Inc. Usability Usability.gov Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited (3rd Edition), by Steve Krug. ©2014, New Riders. Web Site Usability: A Designer’s Guide, by Jared M. Spool, Tara Scanlon, Will Schroeder, Carolyn Snyder, Terri DeAngelo. ©2007, Elsevier, Inc. Card Sorting, by Donna Spencer. ©2011, Rosenfeld Media. Usable Usability: Simple Steps for Making Stuff Better, by Eric Reiss. ©2012, Wiley & Sons, Inc. Measuring the User Experience: Collecting, Analyzing, and Presenting Usability Metrics, by Thomas Tullis and William Albert. ©2010, Elsevier.

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