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4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
4.5 british ig
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4.5 british ig

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  • 1. The British Independent GroupArt 109A: Art since 1945Westchester Community CollegeFall 2012Dr. Melissa Hall
  • 2. The BritishIndependent GroupFormed in 1952 by students at theInstitute of Contemporary Art,London
  • 3. The BritishIndependent GroupEmbraced “popular culture” --Rebelled against the elitist valuesof the British art establishment“Movies, science fiction, advertising,Pop music. We felt none of the dislike ofcommercial culture standard amongmost intellectuals, but accepted it asfact, discussed it in detail, andconsumed it enthusiastically.”Lawrence Alloway Eduardo Paolozzi, I was a Rich Man’s Plaything, 1947 Tate Gallery
  • 4. The BritishIndependent GroupWhile British society continued tosuffer economic scarcity, Americanadvertising suggested a glamorousculture of abundance Nigel Henderson, Shop Front Bethnal Green (London East End), 1949-1953
  • 5. “These collages are mainly made frommagazines given to Paolozzi by American ex-servicemen. They show his fascination withpopular culture and technology, as well as withthe glamour of American consumerism. The titleof the series refers to Henry Fords famousstatement that History is more or less bunk....We want to live in the present. It reflectsPaolozzis belief that his work should respondto contemporary culture.”Tate Gallery Eduardo Paolozzi, Meet the People, 1948 From the Bunk series, Tate Gallery
  • 6. Eduardo Paolozzi, I was a Rich Man’s Plaything, 1947 Eduardo Paolozzi, Evadne in Green DimensionTate Gallery (Bunk!), 1952
  • 7. The British Independent Group The term “Pop Art” was first coined by the art critic Lawrence Alloway“Pop Art, in its original form, was apolemic against elite views of art inwhich uniqueness is a metaphor ofthe aristocratic and contemplationthe only proper response to art.”Lawrence Alloway. “Pop Art: The Words” Lawrence Alloway, art critic and Independent Group member
  • 8. The BritishIndependent GroupHe proposed a “continuum”between “high” and “low” art thatrefused to recognize hierarchies
  • 9. The BritishIndependent GroupThe Independent Groupimplemented their non-hierarchicalaesthetic of inclusiveness in severalexhibitions Independent Group, Parallel of Life and Art, ICA, 1953
  • 10. Independent Group, Parallel of Life and Art, ICA, 1953
  • 11. The BritishIndependent GroupFor an exhibition at theWhitechapel Gallery in 1956,members of the Independent Groupcollaborated on room-sizeinstallations This is Tomorrow, Whitechapel Gallery, 1956
  • 12. The BritishIndependent GroupOne installation included a 16 foot“Robbie the Robot” from the filmThe Forbidden Planet This is Tomorrow, Whitechapel Gallery, 1956
  • 13. The BritishIndependent GroupAnd an image of Marilyn Monroefrom The Seven Year Itch This is Tomorrow, Whitechapel Gallery, 1956
  • 14. The BritishIndependent GroupAnd amidst all this “kitsch” was areproduction of Van Gogh’sSunflowers -- the best sellingreproduction from the NationalGallery of Art This is Tomorrow, Whitechapel Gallery, 1956
  • 15. The British Independent Group A jukebox played popular songs while the spongy floors emitted strawberry scented air freshener“In This is Tomorrow the visitor isexposed to space effects, play withsigns, a wide range of materials andstructures, which, taken together,make of art and architecture a many-chanelled activity, as factual and farfrom ideal standards as the streetoutside.”Lawrence Allowayhttp://www.independentgroup.org.uk/contributors/alloway/index.html This is Tomorrow, Whitechapel Gallery, 1956
  • 16. The BritishIndependent GroupWidely regarded as the foundingwork of the Pop art movement, thiscollage was made for the show’sposter and catalog Richard Hamilton, Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? 1956
  • 17. The BritishIndependent GroupDescribed by the artist as “instantart,” the work is made entirely fromadvertisements in magazines Richard Hamilton, Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? 1956
  • 18. “Hamilton and company seemed toquestion the very spectacle theycelebrated”Foster et al, Art Since 1900

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