Kristin Lems PCI at TESOL 2014 - Music and Song in Teaching ESL
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Kristin Lems PCI at TESOL 2014 - Music and Song in Teaching ESL

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The powerpoint from Kristin Lems' Pre-conference Workshop, How Teachers can Incorporate Music and Song in Teaching ESL, TESOL 2014. ...

The powerpoint from Kristin Lems' Pre-conference Workshop, How Teachers can Incorporate Music and Song in Teaching ESL, TESOL 2014.

c 2014 Kristin Lems kristinlems@gmail.com
Also see: ESL Support Video Channel: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNILOFXqUb-YY4hhjV4cOog

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  • This is wonderful! Love the ideas! Thank you —Yesh!
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  • Hi Amy, I created this slideshow, for a presentation at International TESOL, and I give you permission to share it with teachers in the Netherlands. By the way, I have family in the Netherlands and would love to present for your teachers when I am visiting my family there!
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  • Hi Tereza, this looks really great! Is it okay if I share this with teachers in The Netherlands?
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  • I'm sharing this in the interest of helping my colleagues in the ESL field all over the world. I'd appreciate a 'like' for the effort!
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  • Hello colleagues. I hope your students and teachers enjoy this.It's from TESOL 2014!
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    Kristin Lems PCI at TESOL 2014 - Music and Song in Teaching ESL Kristin Lems PCI at TESOL 2014 - Music and Song in Teaching ESL Presentation Transcript

    • Kristin Lems Professor, ESL/Bilingual Education National Louis University TESOL 2014, Portland, OR How Teachers can Incorporate Music and Song into Teaching ESL TESOL Pre-convention Institute
    • abstract Music and song stimulate language growth by training the ear to sounds and patterns; practicing new sounds, words, and idioms through singing; and creating classroom community while lowering the affective filter. With the Internet and smartphones, any teacher can purposefully incorporate songs and music in the classroom. 2014 Kristin Lems
    •  Learning about music is valid in its own right, not just as a means to other knowledge or skills  Language acquisition and learning are integrated processes, & so is the role of music in them is, too… Presenter Beliefs: 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Where does music perception and processing “reside” in the brain? 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Music and language processing  are both located in Broca’s area  both recognize patterns and syntax 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 2014 Kristin Lems Broca’s area lights up on PET scans when subjects hear a discordant musical sequence just as it does when they hear an ungrammatical utterance.
    • Music is also processed in the limbic system, which controls emotions  Carol Krumhansl (Cornell University): …music directly elicits a range of emotions. Music with a quick tempo in a major key…brought about all the physical changes associated with happiness in listeners. In contrast, a slow tempo and minor key led to sadness. 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Geoffrey Miller, University College, London: pattern recognition  "Our brain is constantly trying to make order out of disorder, and music is a fantastic pattern game for our higher cognitive centers…..our brains are exercised by extracting different patterns and groupings from music's performance.  This pattern recognition gave rise to language and stands behind mathematical ability as well (The Math Gene). 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Educators all know… Music overcomes inhibitions Music gives people a chance to share their likes and preferences Music is non-hierarchical – people can enjoy and take part in it regardless of educational attainment Every culture has music – no one is “deprived” 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Music is associated with our deepest memories You must remember this… 2014 Kristin Lems
    • The power of the arts in education  Autistic children can be highly analytical listeners and are able to access musical details more readily than typically developing children ScienceDaily (May 27, 2004)  Artistic activities build community  Provides an outlet and validation for GLBT kids with artistic talent 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Music can create deep conversations 2014 Kristin Lems
    • What do we know about music and learning? 2014 Kristin Lems
    • An interest in a performing art leads to a high state of motivation. That in turn produces the sustained attention and the training of attention that leads to improvement in other cognitive domains. 2014 Kristin Lems
    • One of the central predictors of early literacy, phonological awareness, is correlated with both music training and the development of a specific brain pathway. Dana Foundation, 2008 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Music is positively associated with academic achievement, especially during the high school years Citation: Southgate et al. The Impact of Music on Childhood and Adolescent Achievement. Social Science Quarterly, 2009; 90 (1): 4 DOI: 10.1111/j.1540- 6237.2009.00598.x 2014 Kristin Lems
    • The infant brain makes associations between melody and positions in space  When baby hears rising melody sequence while watching an object rise, and falling sequence of notes with a falling object, they learn to pair them  When baby as young as 4 months shown object falling when sequence of notes is RISING, and object rising when melody sequence falls, they do not learn the pairing Relationship between sound and space perception (Spelke, in Dana report, 2008) 2013 Kristin Lems
    • Hearing songs in new languages assists in the segmenting of new words, probably due to the motivational and structuring properties of song 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Music as a Universal Language Sing the audience’s part at Bobbie McFerrin’s appearance at the 2009 World Science Festival 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Why are pop songs so powerful for language learners?  They’re everywhere – many learners have them as part of their background knowledge  They use high frequency vocabulary  Use of 2nd person, first person singular and plural draws listeners in, giving them an emotional “stake” in the music  They are repetitive, a perfect effortless “drill” for sounds and syntax (Tim Murphey, 2000) 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Parallels between benefits of music learning and bilingualism  Both are associated with cognitive advantages  Both are proven to hold back the effects of Alzheimers  Both have more powerful effects when introduced at an early age 2014 Kristin Lems
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    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 1. Using instrumental or vocal music as a writing prompt and conversation starter 2. Presenting about a musical genre, artist or musical work from the L1 culture 3. Singing together ~ with or without gestures and props 4. Studying a song for its grammar, syntax, vocabulary, fast speech, punctuation 5. Focus on listening – transcribing a song 6. Using a graphic organizer to analyze a song 7. Creating a visualization of a song using technology 8. Writing an interpretation to the plot of a song 9. Writing a new verse for a song and performing it 10. Learning a dance with or without words 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 1. Using instrumental or vocal music as a writing prompt and conversation starter Exemplar: El Condor Pasa 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Example: El Condor Pasa  Written 1913  Part of a full scale orchestral work  Highlighted struggle of Peruvian miners against European bosses  Wildly popular for decades! Daniel Alomía Robles Born 1871, Huánuco, Peru - Died 1942, Lima, Peru 2014 Kristin Lems
    • In the work, the Condor serves as a symbol of freedom for the Incan people. 2014 Kristin Lems
    • From recording by Simon and Garfunkel I’d rather be a sparrow than a snail… I’d rather be a hammer than a nail… I’d rather be a forest than a street… I’d rather feel the earth beneath my feet… Students write sentences with these frames: I’d rather be ___________ than __________ I’d rather ______________ than __________ 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 2. Presenting about a musical genre, artist or musical work Exemplar: Umm Kulthum 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Umm Kulthum 1898-1975  Great Egyptian singer renowned across Arabic- speaking world considered “diva” “royalty” from the power of her song 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Write or talk about your favorite singer…… 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Presenting about a musical genre, artist or musical work Lesson plan: • Students create an oral report about their favorite artist or genre • They can include a brief mp3 or YouTube of the artist – limit to 3 minutes • As student presents, have others fill out a feedback form (establish purpose) and give to the presenter 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Feedback form 2014 Kristin Lems Name of presenter: __________________________ Subject of the presentation: ____________________ My name: __________________________________ “I really liked _______________________________.” Something I learned: “I learned that______________________________.”
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 3. Singing together ~ with or without gestures and props Exemplar: 5 Green and speckled Frogs and the Itsy Bitsy Spider 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Singing supercharges opportunities to hear and practice new words! (And it’s lots of fun, too!) 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Singing supercharges opportunities to hear and practice new words! (And it’s lots of fun, too!) 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Five Green and Speckled Frogs 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Focus: 2014 Kristin Lems
    • The Itsy Bitsy Spider A song about resilience! 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Focus: 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Why is this tornado Called a waterspout? 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 4. Studying a song for its grammar, syntax, vocabulary, fast speech, punctuation Exemplars: I’m Yours by Jason Mraz Talking Leaves by Johnny Cash 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Jason Mraz – text analysis After listening once to “I’m Yours”: What does “done done” mean? How does the phrase “You win some…” end? What is another way to pronounce “The sky is yours?” and what does it mean? 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 2014 Kristin Lems Lesson plan: Listen once without lyrics and talk about the music Provide cloze and play again Provide complete lyric sheet Discuss grammatical, lexical, idiomatic, cultural features of the song Play it again as a singalong!
    • 2014 Kristin Lems Well you done done me and you bet I felt it I tried to be chill but you're so hot that I melted I fell right through the cracks, now I'm trying to get back Before the cool done run out I'll be giving it my bestest And nothing's going to stop me but divine intervention I reckon it's again my turn to win some or learn some But I won't hesitate no more, no more It cannot wait, I'm yours Well open up your minds and see like me Open up your plans and damn you're free Look into your heart and you'll find love love love love Listen to the music of the moment people dance and sing We're just one big family And it's our God-forsaken right to be loved loved loved loved loved done done bestest win some or learn some
    • 2014 Kristin Lems So I won't hesitate no more, no more It cannot wait, I'm sure There's no need to complicate, our time is short This is our fate, I'm yours D-d-do do you, but do you, d-d-do But do you want to come on Scootch on over closer dear so I can nibble your ear? I've been spending way too long checking my tongue in the mirror And bending over backwards just to try to see it clearer But my breath fogged up the glass And so I drew a new face and I laughed I guess what I been saying is there ain't no better reason To rid yourself of vanities and just go with the seasons It's what we aim to do, our name is our virtue But I won't hesitate no more, no more It cannot wait, I'm sure there’s no need to complicate… Open up your mind and see like me Open up your plans and damn you're free Look into your heart and you'll find that the sky is yours I won't hesitate no more, no more -It cannot wait, I'm yours bending over backwards this guy is yours
    • Talking leaves by Johnny Cash Johnny’s song, based on the story of Sequoia and the invention of the Cherokee alphabet
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 5. Focus on listening – transcribing a song Exemplar: Que Sera, Sera 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Transcribing an Easy Song 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Lesson plan  Divide students into small groups  Each group is assigned one verse  Least proficient group can be assigned to chorus  Each member of group listens to song, writes what they hear, and compares notes to create one version  A member of the group writes it on board, and the whole class listens again  Any miscues noticed by other groups are corrected, correct lyric sheet provided2014 Kristin Lems
    • 2014 Kristin Lems Ways to scaffold:  preteach key words in advance (e.g. whatever, handsome, tenderly)  explicitly teach tricky features: (e.g. future’s not ours… (American flap)
    • Transcribing a song with a certain focus  “the American flap” “Mairzy Doats”  Preteach: mare, doe, lamb, kid 2014 Kristin Lems Mares eat oats and does eat oats And little lambs eat ivy A kid’ll eat ivy too, wouldn’t you? T + y = sh
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 6. Using a graphic organizer to analyze a song Exemplar: Ironic by Alanis Morrisette 2014 Kristin Lems
    • “Infographic” by Matt Stopera  To accompany “Ironic” by Alanis Morrisette 2014 Kristin Lems
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    • Won$1,000,000inlottery DiedMonday morning Tuesday morning timeline 2014 Kristin Lems
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    • timeline 2013 Kristin Lems
    • timeline 2013 Kristin Lems
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    • 2013 Kristin Lems Oh dear….late again….I need a good excuse..
    • 2014 Kristin Lems
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    • Life sneaking up on you Life helping you out 2014 Kristin Lems
    • These are the Breaks…  By Kurtis Blow 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 7. Creating a visualization of song lyrics using technology Exemplar: Help! By the Beatles 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Visualization project lesson plan:  Students choose a song (with your blessing)  Student creates a photostory or powerpoint of the song using images they have chosen  It is played in class  Students discuss how they chose their images  Example: “Help” found on YouTube 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 8. Writing an interpretation of the plot of a song Exemplar: Man of Constant Sorrow 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Characteristics of Bluegrass From Kentucky and Appalachia Irish, Scottish, African, British influences A capella singing, usually telling a story Taking turns on the solos Sometimes, very fast playing Male falsetto voice (singing up high) Acoustic instruments (not electric)2014 Kristin Lems
    • Bill Monroe, father of bluegrass (1911-1996) named after his Kentucky band, Blue Grass 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Originally made by coal miners, truckers, farmers…poor people’s music from rural America 2014 Kristin Lems
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    • The guitar, mandolin, standup bass…. 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Do you know this banjo player? 2014 Kristin Lems
    • And don’t forget……  The fiddle! 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Man of Constant Sorrow Traditional American tune from the movie soundtrack “O Brother Where Art Thou?” (2002 Grammy) Performed by Dan Tyminski and the Soggy Bottom Boys
    • 1. I am a man of constant sorrow I've seen trouble all my days I bid farewell to old Kentucky the place where I was born and raised the place where he was born and raised 2. For six long years I've been in trouble No pleasure here on earth I've found For in this world I'm bound to ramble I have no friends to help me now he has no friends to help him now 3. It's fare thee well my own true lover I never expect to see you again For I'm bound to ride that Northern Railroad Perhaps I'll die upon this train Perhaps he’ll die upon this train 4. You can bury me in some green valley For many years where I may lay May you learn to love another While I am sleeping in my grave While he is sleeping in his grave 5. Maybe your friends think I'm just a stranger My face you never will see no more But there is one promise that is given I'll meet you on God's golden shore He'll meet you on God's golden shore
    • Group Project a. You are a newspaper reporter. Write a story about the events in the song, using a journalistic style. What is the article’s headline? b. The singer is singing this song to you. Write a response to the singer explaining how you feel about the situation. Do you want to see him again? Are you angry at him? Heartbroken? Do you want to follow him? Help us understand what happened, and how you feel about it. 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Group Project c. You are a not-nice next door neighbor of the singer. Tell us about him. d. You are the mother of the singer. Tell his story to a sympathetic audience, such as your hairdresser. How did these things happen to him? Report back to the rest of the class. 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 9. Writing a new verse for a song and performing it 2014 Kristin Lems Exemplar: What a Wonderful World By Louis Armstrong
    • Lesson plan  Give brief bio about Louis Armstrong  Explain the word “Satchmo”  Play a youtube of song while enjoying images  Pass out lyric sheet and listen again  Analyze rhyme pattern  Get into small groups and create new verse  Find karaoke version of song on You Tube and sing new verses to the class 2014 Kristin Lems
    • New Verse to “What a Wonderful World” I see trees of green, red roses too. I see them bloom, for me and you. And I think to myself... what a wonderful world. I see skies of blue, and clouds of white. The bright blessed day, the dark sacred night And I think to myself... what a wonderful world... The colors of the rainbow so pretty in the sky Also the faces of people going by, I see friends shaking hands, say how do you do? They're really saying, I love you. I hear babies crying, I watch them grow. They'll learn much more than I'll ever know, And I think to myself... what a wonderful world Yes I think to myself... what a wonderful world
    • Your verse! I see ____________________ ________________________ (“A” rhyme) _________________________ ________________________ (“A” rhyme) And I think to myself, what a wonderful world! 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 10 techniques to use music with ELLs 10. Learning a dance with or without words Exemplar: Yesh! 2014 Kristin Lems
    • 2014 Kristin Lems Resources: Live performances on You Tube •Compare performances of the same song/dance •Sing to Karaoke songs on You Tube •Google “karaoke” and the artist you’re looking for ~ it’s all there!
    • The power of beauty – music is beautiful! 2014 Kristin Lems
    • Music is fun for ALL ages! Kristin Lems/* ~ stay in touch! kristinlems@gmail.com 2014 Kristin Lems