Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Session 9 ic2011 schimleck
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Session 9 ic2011 schimleck

398

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
398
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Estimation of the wood properties of tropical, sub‐tropical and temperate pine species using NIR spectroscopy L.R. Schimleck1, J. L. M. Matos2,  R. Trianoski2 and J. G. Prata2 1Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Res., University of Georgia 2Department of Forest Sciences, Federal University of Parana
  • 2. Introduction Extensive field trials have been established  in South America that aim to evaluate the  growth and adaptability of several tropical,  sub‐tropical and temperate pine species.  To fully assess their suitability for  deployment in plantations wood property  information needs to be collected for  multiple species, which is prohibitively  expensive using lab‐based methods. Interest exists in using near infrared (NIR)  spectroscopy to estimate mechanical  properties (MOE, MOR). This study aims to  develop multiple pine species calibrations  and to compare calibrations using lab  based and portable spectrometers. 
  • 3. Species and sites examined Samples collected from trials established by CAMCORE and The Center for  the Genetic Conservation and Management of Tropical Pines Species Age Location Pinus caribaea var. bahamensis 17 anos Itararé ‐ SP Pinus caribaea var. caribaea 17 anos Itararé ‐ SP Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis  18 anos  Ventania ‐ PR Pinus chiapensis 18 anos Ventania ‐ PR Pinus maximinoi 18 anos Ventania ‐ PR Pinus oocarpa  18 anos Ventania ‐ PR Pinus taeda 18 anos Ventania ‐ PR Pinus tecunumanii 18 anos Ventania ‐ PR
  • 4. Location of sites 1 = Camcore, 2 = C.C.G.M.P.T
  • 5. Sample collection
  • 6. Sample collection Species Number of  Age (yr) Average diameter at  Average height  trees breast height (cm) (m) Pinus caribaea var. bahamensis 5 17 37 27.0 Pinus caribaea var. caribaea 5 17 37 26.3 Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis 5 18 42 25.1 Pinus chiapensis 5 18 46 29.8 Pinus maximinoi 5 18 47 27.6 Pinus oocarpa 5 18 41 26.7 Pinus taeda 5 18 32 18.4 Pinus tecunumanii 5 18 46 25.9 Base of the tree cut to provide two 2.6 m long logs Ist log used for veneer, 2nd log used for wood  property analysis 10 cm thick slab cut through the pith, and consecutive  static bending samples cut from the slab
  • 7. Wood property evaluation
  • 8. Wood property evaluation
  • 9. Wood properties Properties Density Elastic properties Compression Shear Hardness Species (12%) MOR MOE MOR MOE MPa N kg/m3 MPa MPa MPa MPa P. c.bahamensis 484 63 6.568 33 9.550 10 2795 P. c caribaea 433 56 6.060 30 10.480 9 2138 P. c.hondurensis 500 64 7.206 36 11.324 11 2667 P. chiapensis 440 61 7.590 36 11.546 9 2511 P. maximinoi 530 70 9.045 40 14.133 11 3383 P. oocarpa 540 68 7.788 41 13.597 12 3403 P. taeda 516 63 8.234 40 13.197 10 3138 P. tecunumanii 561 71 8.878 42 15.109 11 3393
  • 10. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy Widely used to measure parameters that are time  consuming to measure NIR spectrum closely related to wood chemistry Applicable to static bending samples and has been  used to estimate a range of wood properties Calibrations limited to a small number of species or  sites Global calibrations – rare in forestry (several reasons) • NIR applied to wood for only a short time • Most properties are expensive to measure • Limited networks to share samples
  • 11. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy Transverse Radial
  • 12. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy
  • 13. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy
  • 14. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy
  • 15. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy
  • 16. Building calibration models based on NIR and wood property data  Estimation of a parameter involves the following steps: Collect spectra of calibration samples Develop a calibration (regression) (y = B0 + X1*B1 + X2*B2 + ………..+ XN*BN) Collect NIR spectra of test (or unknown) samples Estimate parameter of interest for test set samples  using the calibration
  • 17. Calibrations for density (334 samples) Calibration Number of  R2 SEC SECV RPDC Factors FOSS Static Density (Kg/m3) ‐ Radial face 8 0.81 35.6 38.5 2.1 Density (Kg/m3) ‐ Transverse face 8 0.80 36.8 38.3 2.2 FOSS Probe Density (Kg/m3) ‐ Radial face 4 0.51 57.8 58.8 1.4 Density (Kg/m3) ‐ Transverse face 10 0.68 46.8 49.3 1.7 ASD Probe Density (Kg/m3) ‐ Radial face 8 0.73 43.2 45.8 2.0 Density (Kg/m3) ‐ Transverse face 10 0.70 45.0 48.5 1.8
  • 18. Calibration for Density (transverse face, FOSS Static) 900 800 Measured density (kg/m3) 700 600 500 8 factors R2 = 0.80 400 SEC = 36.8 kg/m3 300 SECV = 38.3 kg/m3 RPDc = 2.2 200 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 NIR-estimated density (kg/m3)
  • 19. Calibrations for MOE (334 samples) Calibration Number of  R2 SEC SECV RPDC Factors FOSS Static MOE (MPa) ‐ Radial face 8 0.78 1154 1215 2.1 MOE (MPa) ‐ Transverse face 6 0.81 1095 1123 2.2 FOSS Probe MOE (MPa) ‐ Radial face 7 0.55 1668 1747 1.4 MOE (MPa) ‐ Transverse face 8 0.68 1411 1464 1.7 ASD Probe MOE (MPa) ‐ Radial face 9 0.73 1308 1413 1.8 MOE (MPa) ‐ Transverse face 6 0.75 1252 1303 1.7
  • 20. Calibration for MOE (transverse face, FOSS Static) 16000 Measured stiffness (MPa) 12000 8000 6 factors R2 = 0.81 4000 SEC = 1095 MPa SECV = 1123 MPa RPDc = 2.2 0 0 4000 8000 12000 16000 NIR-estimated stiffness (MPa)
  • 21. Calibrations for MOR (334 samples) Calibration Number of  R2 SEC SECV RPDC Factors FOSS Static MOR (MPa) ‐ Radial face 4 0.69 8.4 8.6 1.7 MOR (MPa) ‐ Transverse face 6 0.73 7.9 8.0 1.9 FOSS Probe MOR (MPa) ‐ Radial face 7 0.50 10.6 11.2 1.3 MOR (MPa) ‐ Transverse face 10 0.61 9.3 10.4 1.4 ASD Probe MOR (MPa) ‐ Radial face 8 0.67 8.6 9.2 1.6 MOR (MPa) ‐ Transverse face 5 0.64 9.0 9.2 1.6
  • 22. Calibration for MOR (transverse face, FOSS Static) 120 100 Measured MOR (MPa) 80 60 6 factors 40 R2 = 0.73 SEC = 7.9 MPa 20 SECV = 8.0 MPa RPDc = 1.9 0 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 NIR-estimated MOR (MPa)
  • 23. Conclusions • Wood property calibrations obtained for density, MOE and  MOR using several pine species growing on two sites • Transverse surface spectra marginally better than radial face  spectra • FOSS Static system provided the strongest calibrations,  followed by ASD probe and FOSS probe systems

×