Successfully reported this slideshow.

Session 20 ic2011 hammett

432 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Session 20 ic2011 hammett

  1. 1. Survival and Entrepreneurship:  The  Forest Products Entrepreneurs of  Southern Malawi  By   E. Brad Hager, Ndalapa Mhango, and Tom HammeB    Current Topics in Forest Products MarkeEng Research  Forest Products Society 65th InternaEonal ConvenEon  Portland, OR  ‐ June 21, 2011  
  2. 2. Outline •  Background •  Study goal and objec5ves •  Methods •  Implica5ons •  Future ac5vi5es 
  3. 3. “The Warm Heart of Africa” 
  4. 4. Challenges •  Poverty (53%) •  Least Developed Country Status •  HIV/AIDS Pandemic  
  5. 5. Forest Products •  Important source of income •  Much hidden in informal sector •  Low technology‐inefficiency •  Na5ve tropical hardwood  resources exhausted  
  6. 6. Goal of Project Determine if entrepreneurship exists in Malawi’s very distressed economic environment and if so, what are the characteris5cs.  
  7. 7. ObjecEves 1.  Iden5fy   –  Driving Mo5ves  –  Key Success Factors  –  Current Marke5ng Prac5ces  –  Major Challenges/Obstacles 2.  Develop Recommenda5ons 
  8. 8. Entrepreneurs Sub‐Saharan Africa •  Nature of entrepreneurship  varies by socio‐cultural context •  Informal sector or hidden  economy 
  9. 9. Methods •  In‐depth interviews   –  Story telling   –  Average 42 minutes •  Respondent‐Driven Sampling  –  Access “hidden economy”  –  “Include” key groups rather than a  “representa5ve sample”   
  10. 10. Forest products parEcipants  (15 of 35) •  Sawyer/5mber suppliers    (4) •  Furniture manufacturers     (4) •  Coffins and cabinets    (3) •  Wooden fishing boats     (1) •  Toys and cra^s       (3)  
  11. 11. Categorizing by MoEves 1.  Necessity‐driven: forced into self‐ employment by necessity 2.  Opportunity‐driven:  drawn into  self‐employment by desire 3.  High ExpectaEon: opportunity‐ driven; poten5al for large impact  
  12. 12. Clusters (all par5cipants) 
  13. 13. Clusters  (forest products producers) 
  14. 14. MoEves •  Mo5ve based entrepreneur types  “cluster” by educa5on level and  business experience •  Vast majority have primary level  educa5on; most entrepreneurs  are likely necessity‐based  
  15. 15. Key Success Factors •  Honest business prac5ces •  Nego5a5on skills •  Adequate finances •  Financial management skills •  Voca5onal training 
  16. 16. MarkeEng PracEces •  Promo: On‐site signs and word of  mouth (reputa5on is crucial) •  Place: Must be near customers as  public transporta5on difficult •  Price:  Nego5a5on/price sensi5ve •  Product: Must meet basic needs  without unnecessary features 
  17. 17. General Challenges •  Access to start‐up capital •  Business training desired by  lending ins5tu5ons unavailable •  Customers have lible disposable  income in distressed markets •  Bureaucracy and local corrup5on  
  18. 18. Wood‐Related Challenge 1.  DeforestaEon (mountain was  forested five years ago)   ImplicaEons:  •  Rapid increase in wood costs •  Need to use less desirable species 
  19. 19. Wood‐Related Challenge 2.  Lack of Wood Drying Technology:  Use of green or poorly air‐dried  lumber in furniture produc5on   ImplicaEons:  •  Poor product quality limits access to  more lucra5ve markets •  Wood lost in drying process 
  20. 20. Wood‐Related Challenge 3.  Lack of Basic Power Hand Tools:  Much of the manufacturing u5lizes  basic hand saws, planers, etc.  ImplicaEons:  •  Again poor product quality limits  access to more lucra5ve markets  •  Inconsistent products  characteris5cs 
  21. 21. Response to Challenges InnovaEon:  Use of electric fan  motor, leather belt, and hand file  to create a lathe (improvise)  
  22. 22. Response to Challenges InnovaEon:  Learn to u5lize and  plant non‐indigenous species  
  23. 23. Ques5ons?   Comments? 
  24. 24. Thank you! Tom Hammeb  Virginia Tech himal@vt.edu 

×