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Presentation by Jim Lunt of Jim Lunt & Associates LLC.

Presentation by Jim Lunt of Jim Lunt & Associates LLC.

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INDA presentation INDA presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Bio-feedstocks, Chemicals and Polymers. Trends, Success Stories and Challenges. KISBP 2012 January 30, 2014.
  • Presentation Outline  Bio materials definitions.  Present and Emerging Bio-Feedstock's .  Emerging Bio Chemicals and Players.  First Generation Bioplastics.  Second Generation Biobased Plastics.  Bioplastics Growth Projections and Market Trends.  Applications in Use Today for Bioplastics.
  • Basic Definitions for Bioproducts. Biobased Products Must be organic and contain some percentage of recently fixed (new) carbon found in biological resources or crops. Focus on renewable resource based origin. Uses C14 content measurement. Biodegradable or Compostable Bioplastics Meet all scientifically recognized standards for biodegradability and compostability of plastics and plastic products. Independent of carbon origin-(i.e. Ecoflex, PBS, PLA ). Focus is on end-of-life or disposability.
  • Common Renewable Feedstocks Sugars: Sugar Beet, Sugar cane, sweet sorghum, corn dextrose. Starches: Corn, Cassava, sorghum, sweet potato, wheat. Oils & Fats : Edible: Coconut oil, palm oil, sunflower seed, soy beans. Non Edible: Castor beans, Jatropha.
  • Concerns with Existing Feedstocks from Food Crops The Food versus Fuel debate: • Food Crops Diversion to Fuels/Plastics • Land Use • Fertilizer Use • Pesticide Use • The “Ripple Effect “ Use of GMO's
  • Biomass Feedstocks Under Consideration Lignocellulose (wood, corn stover, other agricultural residues) Oil seeds (soy, rape/canola, palm, coconut, Jatropha) Microalgae Macroalgae (kelp) Waste:    MSW, food processing (cellulosic) Used fats and oils Animal processing wastes (rendering, feathers, hair, manure, etc.)
  • Green House Gases as Feedstocks Novomer PPC Newlight Technologies PHA’s
  • Biochemical Examples Ethylene/ethylene glycol Braskem, India Glycols. TPA Gevo, Anellotech, Draths, Genomatica, UOP, Global Bioenergies, Sabic, Virent,Chemtex. Succinic acid PTT, DSM, BASF, Bioamber, Roquette, Mitsubishi Chem., Myriant, Purac. Rennovia, Verdezyne, Genomatica. Genomatica. Adipic acid Butane diol FDCA Avantium. Ketals Segetis, XLTerra/Reluceo. Caprolactam Acrylic acid Isosorbide Propylene Propane 1,3 diol Draths. Ceres, Dow/OPX. ADM, Roquette. Braskem. DuPont / Tate & Lyle.
  • Bio Ethylene/Ethylene Glycol India Glycols, GTC, FENC, JBF fermentation ethanol sugar cane molasses -H2O +H2O ethylene glycol oxidation ethylene oxide ethylene
  • Biobased TPA Virent Process.
  • Biobased Succinic Acid and Derivatives Biobased Succinic Acid Succinic acid/PBS • BioAmber • PTT • MCC • DSM/Roquette • BASF/Purac Butane diol • Genomatica Adipic acid • Rennovia • Verdezyne Courtesy Myriant
  • Bio Butane Diol
  • FDCA (furan 2,5 dicarboxylic acid) Avantium
  • First Generation Bioplastics Compounded, Biobased & Compostable …………………….…………………………………………… Starch/PLA/ECOFLEX Polylactic Acid (PLA) O O HO H OH CH3 L-Lactic Acid HO H3C OH H D-Lactic Acid (0.5%) 100% Renewable & Compostable
  • First Generation PHA’s Compostable, Biodegradable and Renewable PHA picture courtesy of Metabolix
  • Performance Concerns of First Generation Compostable Bioplastics Areas of Concern Hydrolytic stability Distortion Temp Vapor Transmission Shelf Life PLA Hydrolytic Stability Distortion Temp (amorphous) Vapor Transmission Shelf Life Tear strength Melt Strength …………………….……………………………..…………… …………………….……………………………..…………… Starch Blends …………………….……………………………..…………… …………………….……………………………..…………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………… PHA’S Hydrolytic Stability √ √ Shelf Life Processability Melt Strength Economics
  • Second Generation Bioplastics Developments
  • Green Polyethylene Braskem ethanol sugar cane molasses HDPE polyethylene ethylene Non Compostable
  • Bio PET
  • Nylon 6,6
  • Sorona™-PTT
  • Avantium PEF ‘yxy’ bottles FDCA PEF Plant based carbohydrates films fibers EG Courtesy of Avantium
  • Projected Biomaterials Trends Bioplastics are still less than 1% of the approximate 240 million tons of plastics in use today.
  • Sales Trends in Bioplastics 205KT 500KT Jim Lunt & Associates LLC. Projections 1.2MT
  • Why The Change? Continuing lack of infrastructure for use and disposal of compostable plastics. “Compostables” performance v durables. Increasing demand for biobased, semi-durable and durable products for household goods, electronics and automotive applications. Increasing interest and developments in existing and new monomers from renewable resources.
  • Bioplastic Products Development/Commercial
  • PLA
  • Cellulose Acetate
  • Compounded PLA/Starch Blends
  • Green Polyethylene
  • Bio PET
  • Sorona
  • Avantium PEF Made from 100% Recycled PEF Conventional polyester spinning technology Conventional polyester dyeing technology
  • Challenges/Opportunities for Bio Materials.  Oil pricing continuing to increase.  Improved performance/ reduced cost.  Composting/recycling infrastructure developments.  Expanding from single-use compostable to durable applications.  Moving to non-food source feedstocks.  Competition from carbon dioxide based plastics.  Natural gas dynamics on polyolefin/ aromatics Pricing.
  • Thank You