Virtual Museum II: Museum of Historical Art

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  • The Museum of Historical ArtDoge’s Palace
  • The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque began in the seventeenth century as a way to reform itself as the Catholic Church was struggling to win back those who had been drawn away by the Protestant Reformation. The church wanted to attract people to their arts and made a sensual turn by displaying a range of human emotion and feelings which came to be known as the Baroque. Its focal point was the Vatican City in Rome.
  • Michelangelo Merisi, known as Caravaggio (1571-1610) was the master of light and dark was the most influential painter of his days. Caravaggio’s first major commission was The Calling of St. Matthew in Rome which displays light as a dramatic element in this painting. Tax collector Levi (St. Matthew) and his four assistances are dressed of a style not of Jesus’s times, but of Caravaggios are centered where light beams in from an unseen window in the upper right corner of the painting. Jesus enters from the right with a halo and his index finger pointed towards St. Matthew as his head is hung low unto the table.Caravaggio, The Calling off St. Matthew. ca. 1599-1600. Oil on canvas, 11’1” x 11’5. Contarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei Francesi, Rome.
  • Human freedom was fundamental to the Enlightenment, finding political expression the American Declaration of Independence and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen. The Age of Revolution (American Revolution) was essentially the revolt of an upper class that felt disenfranchised by its distant king, while the French Revolution was a revolt against an absolute monarch whose abuse of power had disenfranchised his own people.
  • Paul Revere a silversmith and engraver produced a print called, The Bloody Massacre in 1770. This hand-colored engraving details the attack on March 5, 1770 as an angry mob of Bostonians attacked a small band of British troops stationed at the Boston Custom House as they were protecting the custom agents and tax collectors. British troops opened fire killing five.Paul Reverse. After Henry Pelham,, The Bloody Massacre. ca. 1770. Hand-colored engraving, 8 15/16” x 10 3/16”.
  • The Age of Encounter explores how Portugal and Spain were active in seeking trading opportunities but focused on African and the Eastern cultures. Their focus on the African and Eastern cultures displays how their rulers created lifelike images of their ancestors by producing naturalistic portraits out of clay and stone.
  • At the La Venta three colossal stone heads stood guard over the ceremonial center on the south end of the platform and a fourth guarded the north end by itself. The colossal heads are carved of basalt and weighs between 11 and 24 tons each bearing an unique headgear similar to old-style American leather football helmets. The stone heads are generally believed to be portraits of Olmec rulers which they share the same facial features, including wide, flat noses and thick lips. Colossal head, La Venta, Mexico, Olmec culture. ca. 900-500 BCE. Basalt, height 7’ 5’. La Venta Park, Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico.
  • The Modern Age was the way the physical universe radically changed. Still photography suddenly became animated into a moving picture. A motion-picture theatre was open, automobiles were created, science and physics were discovered which all changed how the physical universe became transformed into the Modern Age.
  • Pablo Picasso’s double portrait of Marie-Therese expresses her as a moon, sun, night, and light as her facial expressions appears in both profiles of the painting. Her protruding belly on the left suggests her fertility. Picasso paints Marie-Therese psyche both literally and figuratively, which the long oval mirror supported by both sides is her psyche.Pablo Picasso, Girl Before a Mirror. Boisgeloup. March 1932. Oil on canvas, 64 x 5 ¼’.

Transcript

  • 1. Jamiee Marshall Dean Feldman Humanities 60398 The Museum of Historical Art Doge’s Palace
  • 2. Exhibit Directory • Wing 1 Renaissance • Wing 2 The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque • Wing 3 The Age of Revolution • Wing 4 The Age of Encounter • Wing 5 The Modern Age
  • 3. The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque began in the seventeenth century as a way to reform itself as the Catholic Church was struggling to win back those who had been drawn away by the Protestant Reformation. The church wanted to attract people to their arts and made a sensual turn by displaying a range of human emotion and feelings which came to be known as the Baroque. Its focal point was the Vatican City in Rome. The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque
  • 4. The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque Louis XIV as the sun, Ballet de la Nuit. 1653. Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris. Rembrandt van Rijn, Christ Preaching (the “Hundred- Guilder Print”). ca. 1648-50. Etching.
  • 5. The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque Sculptures Gianlorenzo Bernini, The Ecstasy of St. Teresa. 1645-52. Marble. Gianlorenzo Bernini. David, 1623. Marble.
  • 6. The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque Andre Le Notre, Versailles. ca. 1669-85. North flowerbed formal French gardens. Veronese, Feast in the House of Levi. ca. 1573. Oil on canvas.
  • 7. The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque Oil Paintings Caravaggio, Conversion of St. Paul. ca. 1601. Oil on canvas. El Greco, Resurrection. ca. 1597-1604. Oil on canvas.
  • 8. The Counter-Reformation and the Baroque Paintings Michelangelo, Last Judgment, Sistine Chapel, Vatican, Rome. 1534-41. Fresco. Fra Andrea Pozzo, Triumph of St. Ignatius of Loyola, Sant’lgnazio, Rome. 1691-94. Ceiling fresco.
  • 9. Caravaggio, The Calling off St. Matthew. ca. 1599-1600. Oil on canvas, 11’1” x 11’5. Contarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei Francesi, Rome. Michelangelo Merisi, known as Caravaggio (1571-1610) was the master of light and dark was the most influential painter of his days. Caravaggio’s first major commission was The Calling of St. Matthew in Rome which displays light as a dramatic element in this painting. Tax collector Levi (St. Matthew) and his four assistances are dressed of a style not of Jesus’s times, but of Caravaggios are centered where light beams in from an unseen window in the upper right corner of the painting. Jesus enters from the right with a halo and his index finger pointed towards St. Matthew as his head is hung low unto the table. Highlighted Work of Art
  • 10. Human freedom was fundamental to the Enlightenment, finding political expression the American Declaration of Independence and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen. The Age of Revolution (American Revolution) was essentially the revolt of an upper class that felt disenfranchised by its distant king, while the French Revolution was a revolt against an absolute monarch whose abuse of power had disenfranchised his own people. The Age of Revolution
  • 11. The Age of Revolution Paintings J. M. W. Turner, Interior of Tintern Abbey. ca. 1794. Watercolor. J. M. W. Turner, The Upper Falls of the Reichenbach. ca. 1810-15. Watercolor.
  • 12. The Age of Revolution Oil Paintings Francisco Goya, The Third of May. ca. 1814-15. Oil on canvas. Jacques-Louis David, The Lictors Returning to Brutus the Bodies of His Sons. ca. 1789. Oil on canvas.
  • 13. The Age of Revolution Oil Paintings Jacques-Louis David, Napoleon Crossing the Saint-Bernard. ca. 1800- 01. Oil on canvas. Theodore Gericault, The Raft of the “Medusa”. ca. 1818. First oil sketch. Oil on canvas.
  • 14. The Age of Revolution William Hackwood, for Josiah Wedgwood, “Am I Not a Man and a Brother?” 1787. Black-and-white jasperware, 1 3/8” x 1 3/8”. Leonardo da Vinci, To Versailles, To Versailles, October 5, 1789. Engraving. Musee de a Ville de Paris, Musee Carnavalet, Paris.
  • 15. The Age of Revolution Pierre-Alexandre Vignon, La Madeine. ca. 1806-42. Paris, Italy. Jacques-Louis David, The Tennis Court Oath. ca. 1789-91. Pen and brown ink and brown wash on paper.
  • 16. Paul Reverse. After Henry Pelham,, The Bloody Massacre. ca. 1770. Hand-colored engraving, 8 15/16” x 10 3/16”. Paul Revere a silversmith and engraver produced a print called, The Bloody Massacre in 1770. This hand-colored engraving details the attack on March 5, 1770 as an angry mob of Bostonians attacked a small band of British troops stationed at the Boston Custom House as they were protecting the custom agents and tax collectors. British troops opened fire killing five. Highlighted Work of Art
  • 17. The Age of Encounter explores how Portugal and Spain were active in seeking trading opportunities but focused on African and the Eastern cultures. Their focus on the African and Eastern cultures displays how their rulers created lifelike images of their ancestors by producing naturalistic portraits out of clay and stone. The Age of Encounter
  • 18. The Age of Encounter Architecture Palace and Temple of Inscriptions. Palenque, Mexico. Maya culture. 600-900 CE. The Pyramid of the Moon, looking north up the Avenue of the Dead. Mesoamerica culture. 500 CE.
  • 19. The Age of Encounter Drawings Cheng Sixiao, Ink Orchids. ca. 1306. Ink on paper. Shen Zhou, Poet on a Mountain Top. ca. 1496. Ink and color on paper.
  • 20. The Age of Encounter Sculptures Head of an Oni (King). Ife culture, Nigeria. ca. thirteenth century. Brass. Head of an Oba. Nigeria; Court of Benin. ca. 1550.
  • 21. The Age of Encounter Sculptures Mask of an iyoba (queen mother), probably Idia, Court of Benin, Nigeria. ca. 1550. Ivory, iron, and cooper, height 9 3/8”. Portuguese Warrior Surrounded by Manillas, Court of Benin, Nigeria. Sixteenth century. Bronze.
  • 22. The Age of Encounter Pair of Vases, Chinese, mark of Xuande reign (1426-1435), Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). Porcelain with underglaze blue decoration. Kinkakuji (Temple of the Golden Pavilion), Rokionji, Kyoto. Rebuilt in 1964 after the original of the 1390s.
  • 23. Colossal head, La Venta, Mexico, Olmec culture. ca. 900-500 BCE. Basalt, height 7’ 5’. La Venta Park, Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico. At the La Venta three colossal stone heads stood guard over the ceremonial center on the south end of the platform and a fourth guarded the north end by itself. The colossal heads are carved of basalt and weighs between 11 and 24 tons each bearing an unique headgear similar to old-style American leather football helmets. The stone heads are generally believed to be portraits of Olmec rulers which they share the same facial features, including wide, flat noses and thick lips. Highlighted Work of Art
  • 24. The Modern Age was the way the physical universe radically changed. Still photography suddenly became animated into a moving picture. A motion-picture theatre was open, automobiles were created, science and physics were discovered which all changed how the physical universe became transformed into the Modern Age. The Modern Age
  • 25. The Modern Age Oil Paintings Paul Cezanne, Still Life with Plaster Cast. ca. 1894. Oil on paper on board. Georges Seurat, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte. ca. 1884. Oil on canvas.
  • 26. The Modern Age Oil Paintings Paul Gauguin, Mahana no atua (Day of the God). ca. 1894. Oil (possibly mixed with wax)on canvas. Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. ca. June- July 1907. Oil on canvas.
  • 27. The Modern Age Oil Paintings Henri Matisse, Dance. Oil on canvas. Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory. ca. 1931. Oil on canvas.
  • 28. The Modern Age Oil Paintings Paul Cezanne, Mount Sainte-Victoire. ca. 1902- 04. Oil on canvas. Pablo Picasso, Horta de Ebro – Houses on a Hill. ca. 1909. Oil on canvas.
  • 29. The Modern Age Umberto Boccioni, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space. ca. 1913. Bronze. Marcel Duchamp, Fountain. ca. 1917; replica 1964. Porcelain.
  • 30. Pablo Picasso, Girl Before a Mirror. Boisgeloup. March 1932. Oil on canvas, 64 x 5 ¼’. Pablo Picasso’s double portrait of Marie-Therese expresses her as a moon, sun, night, and light as her facial expressions appears in both profiles of the painting. Her protruding belly on the left suggests her fertility. Picasso paints Marie-Therese psyche both literally and figuratively, which the long oval mirror supported by both sides is her psyche. Highlighted Work of Art
  • 31. For a limited time through the month of May The Museum of Historical Art will be offering an additional exhibit, the Greek Period. You will not want to miss this special event. Please see guest services for details. Thank you for visiting with us. Please come back again soon!
  • 32. Works Cited Ballet de la Nuit. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Colossal Head. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Doge’s Palace. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Head of an Oba. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Head of an Oni (King). In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Kinkakuji (Temple of the Golden Pavilion). In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. "Map of San Juan." Map of San Juan. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Mar. 2013. <http://www.lonelyplanet.com/maps/caribbean/puerto-rico/san-juan/> Mask of an iyoba (queen mother). In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. "San Juan Puerto Rico." - San Juan Vacations. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Mar. 2013. < http://www.destination360.com/caribbean/puerto-rico/san-juan>
  • 33. Palace. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Pair of Vases. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Portuguese Warrior Surrounded by Manillas. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. The Pyramid and the Moon. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Pyramid of the Moon (looking south down the Avenue of the Dead). In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. To Versailles, To Versailles. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Bernini Gianlorenzo. The Ecstasy of St. Teresa. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Bernini Gianlorenzo. David. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Boccioni Umberto. Unique Forms of Continuity in Space. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources.
  • 34. Bramante Donato. Tempietto. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Brunelleschi. Florence Cathedral. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Caravaggio. Conversion of St. Paul. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Caravaggio. The Calling of St. Matthew. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Caravaggio. Conversion of St. Paul. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Cezanne Paul. Still Life with Plaster Cast. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Cezanne Paul. Mont Sainte-Victoire. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Dali Salvador. The Persistence of Memory. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. da Vinci Leonardo. Embryo in the Womb. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. da Vinci Leonardo. Last Supper. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources.
  • 35. David Jacques-Louis. Napoleon Crossing the Saint-Bernard. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. David Jacques-Louis. The Oath of the Horati. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. David Jacques-Louis. The Lictors Returning to Brutus the Bodies of His Sons. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. David Jacques-Louis. The Tennis Court Oath. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. della Robbia Luca. Drummers. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Duchamp Marcel. Fountain. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. El Greco. Resurrection. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Gericault Theodore. The Raft of the “Medusa”. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Goya Francisco. The Third of May. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources.
  • 36. Hackwood William. Am I Not a Man and a Brother. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Le Notre Andre. North flowerbed. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Matisse Henri. Dance. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Michelangelo. Creation of Adam. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Michelangelo. David. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Michelangelo. Last Judgment. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Michelangelo. Libyan Sibyl. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Michelangelo. Studies for the Libyan Sibyl. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Picasso Pablo. Girl Before a Mirror. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Picasso Pablo. Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources.
  • 37. Picasso Pablo. Horta de Ebro-Houses on a Hill. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Pozzo Fra Andrea. Triumph of St. Ignatius. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Raphael. School of Athens. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Revere Paul. The Bloody Massacre. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Seurat Georges. A Sunday on La Grande Jette. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Sixiao Cheng. Ink Orchids. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Steen Jan. The Dancing Couple. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Titian. Reclining Nude (Venus of Urbino). In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Titian. Sacred and Profane Love. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Turner J. M. W. Interior of Tintern Abbey. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources.
  • 38. Turner J. M. W. The Upper Falls of the Reichenbach. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. van Rijn Rembrandt. Christ Preaching (the “Hundred-Guilder Print”). In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. van Gogh Vincent. Portrait of Patience Escalier. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Veronese. Feast in the House of Levi. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Vignon Pierre-Alexandre. La Madeline. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources. Zhou Shen. Poet on a Mountain Top. In Discovering the Humanities by Henry M. Sayre, Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Pearson, 2010. Resources.