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Ingrid moerman   isbo ng wi nets - overview of the project
 

Ingrid moerman isbo ng wi nets - overview of the project

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    Ingrid moerman   isbo ng wi nets - overview of the project Ingrid moerman isbo ng wi nets - overview of the project Presentation Transcript

    • ISBO NG WiNeTs Next Generation Wireless Networks and Terminals NES & WATS IBCN PATS SMIT
    • Program   14.00 - 14.10 Introduction & Context of the NG Wireless project Wim De Waele , IBBT   14.10 - 14.55 Overview of the NG Wireless project: Ingrid Moerman, IBBT-IBCN-UGent   14.55 - 15.10 Storyline introducing the demos Peter De Cleyn, IBBT-PATS-UA   15.10 - 15.55 Plenary demo presentations   Monitoring interference with sensing technology focusing on low-power lost cost sensing solutions for sensing terminals   Avoiding interference with context-aware adaptive protocols   Minimizing interference with cooperative networks   15.55 - 16.10 Accounting interference: impact of interference on revenue modeling – results Vânia Gonçalves, IBBT-SMIT-VUB   16.10 - ... Demo boots and networking drink 2
    • ISBO NG WiNeTs Next Generation Wireless Networks and Terminals Ingrid Moerman IBBT-IBCN, Ghent University NES & WATS IBCN PATS SMIT
    • Outline  Situating the project  Objectives  Research partners  Milestones  Demos  Regulatory trends & business aspects 4
    • Outline  Situating the project   Wireless networks today   Wireless networks tomorrow: cognitive radio   Cognitive radio research  Objectives  Research partners  Milestones  Demos  Regulatory trends & business aspects 5
    • Wireless networks today   A multitude of wireless technologies & standards   building on proprietary or standardized radio technologies   Tuned for a specific application   Many non-interoperable solutions   different architectures   different protocols   Assumption of homogeneous nodes   same protocol stack on all nodes within network   No cooperation between networks 6
    • Internet evolution: multitude of networks   4G communication networks   Evolution towards a “network of networks”, integrating different technologies (WLAN, UMTS, Ad Hoc, cellular…)   Characteristics   IP-based   Broadband   Wireless access   Support of mobility   Heterogeneity   … 7
    • Internet evolution: multitude of end devices (1)   Personal devices 8
    • Internet evolution: multitude of end devices (2)   Embedded devices Artificiële retina 9 9
    • Internet evolution: a multitude of services ? 10
    • Internet evolution: a multitude of co-located wireless devices   Observation   Growing importance of mobile & wireless networks   Continuous evolution of wireless technologies   Ever increasing number/density of wireless devices   emergence of wireless sensor networks (‘Internet of things’)   Increasing heterogeneity of the Internet   Heterogeneous network technologies   wired & wireless networks   licensed & unlicensed technologies   underutilization of licensed spectrum, scarce unlicensed spectrum   Heterogeneous devices   network interfaces, memory/processing capacity, power supply, fixed/mobile…   Heterogeneous services   Dynamics of mobile and wireless environment   (un)controlled interference, fading, (dis)appearing of devices…   Need for more advanced, more flexible communication paradigms supporting coexistence of heterogeneous wireless technologies  Cognitive Radio 11
    • Cognitive radio and 4A vision   The 4A vision (ITU) = network ubiquity + connectivity to anything   AnyTIME, AnyWHERE connectivity for Anyone for Anything AnyTIME connection For AnyONE On the move Night Daytime AnyWHERE connection Between PCs Human to Human (H2H), not using a PC Human to Thing (H2T), using generic equipment Thing to Thing (T2T) AnyTHING connection Source: ITU Internet Reports 2005: The Internet of Things 12
    • Cognitive radio and 4A vision   enough spectrum, no matter when AnyTIME connection (daytime, night, on the move…)   enough spectrum, no matter where AnyWHERE connection (home, office, indoor, outdoor, at events, on the move…)   enough spectrum, no matter who (young, For AnyONE old, skilled, non-skilled…)   enough spectrum, no matter which device AnyTHING connection (from powerful PCs/laptops up to small embedded devices with very limited capabilities). 13
    • Cognitive radio = spectrum sharing   Vertical spectrum sharing   primary users have exclusive spectrum usage rights in a certain band   secondary users either lease or just autonomously use the spectrum without creating harmful interference to the primaries   Horizontal spectrum sharing   systems/users having equal spectrum usage rights 14
    • Cognitive radio = more flexibility (1)  Radio flexibility (5-tier concept of SDR Forum)   Hardware Radios   no flexibility, fixed functionality   Software Controlled Radios   Fixed signal path   SW interface allows to configure limited number of parameters (current commercial radios)   Software Defined Radios   SW reconfigurable signal path (current SoA flexible radios)   Ideal Software Radios   more functionality of signal path in digital domain   Ultimate Software Radios   blue sky vision: full programmability with analog/digital conversion at antenna 15
    • Cognitive radio = more flexibility (2)   Spectrum access flexibility   No flexibility or fixed access   the frequency allocation scheme is fixed at a given time and location by regulatory bodies   Opportunistic spectrum access   secondary users can actively search for unused spectrum in licensed bands and communicate using these white holes. There is no feedback between primary and secondary users.   Dynamic spectrum access   terminals and technologies can negotiate the use of wireless spectrum locally for a certain time window at run-time. Dynamic spectrum access requires cooperation and negotiation between users. 16
    • Outline  Wireless networks today  Internet evolution  Wireless networks tomorrow: cognitive radio  Cognitive radio research   Research areas   Experimentally-driven research  Belgian research efforts on cognitive radio  Conclusions 17
    • Cognitive radio research areas (1)   Sensing the wireless environment   Identification of spectral opportunities   Methods   detection performed in time or frequency domain   different level of knowledge (energy versus feature detection)   different computational complexity and sensing accuracy 18
    • Cognitive radio research areas (2)   (Re)configuration of wireless transmission parameters   Level of collaboration   Level of information sharing   local versus distributed sensing   Local versus global objective span   local versus collective decisions   cross-layer, cross-node, cross-network optimization  cognitive networking   Optimization objective   minimal interference   minimal energy consumption   maximal QoS guarantees (e.g. maximal throughput)   minimal EM pollution   … 19
    • Cognitive radio research   Experimentally-driven research: why?   Dynamic nature of wireless environment   uncontrolled interference   complex wireless channels (mobility, fading…)   (dis)appearing wireless devices   Theoretical studies or network simulations are often unreliable   they build on simplified and inaccurate channel models   they do not take into account HW limitations   Current experiments are limited   experimental platforms and measurements today are mainly based on 1.  laboratory equipment, such as vector spectrum analyzers, with high sensitivity 2.  very low-cost narrowband, limited sensitivity off-the-shelf components   only small scale experiments   sensing implementations focused on vertical spectrum sharing (detection of TV signals) 20
    • Cognitive radio research   Experimentally-driven research: how? (European vision)   Deployment of large-scale open testbed facilities in realistic wireless environments in view experimental exploration & validation of cognitive radio and cognitive networking research   Creation of flexible experimental platforms enabling various cognitive radio usage scenarios   horizontal and vertical spectrum sharing   licensed and unlicensed bands   heterogeneous wireless technologies   Development of benchmarking methods   enabling experiments under controlled and reproducible test conditions   offering automated procedures for experiments and methodologies for performance evaluation   allowing a fair comparison between different cognitive radio & cognitive networking concepts or between subsequent developments of diverse approaches   Involvement of relevant stakeholders   academia   industry: equipment manufacturers, network operators, vendors…   regulatory bodies   standardization bodies 21
    • Outline  Situating the project  Objectives  Research partners  Milestones  Demos  Regulatory trends & business aspects 22
    • Objectives   Overall research objective   To develop solutions for flexible and efficient use of network/spectrum resources through appropriate sensing and adaptive/intelligent radio/ network management.   Focus areas 1.  Cognitive control functionalities enabling cognitive/opportunistic use of network/spectrum resources 2.  Spectrum sensing functionality for better awareness of the networking environment 3.  E2E energy/power optimization of wireless network and terminal aspects 4.  Flexible and adaptive wireless node (software) architectures enabling energy-efficient and reliable communication in dynamic, heterogeneous and large-scale wireless environments 5.  Market, standard and policy roadmaps and frameworks for Cognitive Radio and Opportunistic Radio 23
    • Focus areas   Cognitive control   Cognitive Radio Connectivity-centric Approach   seamless connectivity across heterogeneous wireless networks (intelligent handover, learning capabilities)   Cognitive Radio Spectrum-centric Approach   Horizontal spectrum sharing   Coexistence of heterogeneous devices in ISM band (IEEE802.11, IEEE802.15.1, IEEE802.15.4)   Study impact of interference   Interference avoidance techniques   Dynamic spectrum sharing   Vertical spectrum sharing   Opportunistic spectrum sharing (frequency & time)   Coexistence of primary and secondary users   Spectrum sensing functionality   Fast, cost-effective and energy-efficient sensing engine 24
    • Focus areas  End to End Energy Efficiency of Wireless Networks   Holistic power optimization approach   Radio devices:   innovative implementations of terminals and base stations   power control strategies   Radio transmission (PHY/MAC)   energy-efficient modulation and coding schemes   energy-aware radio link control and scheduling strategies   multi-mode operation and interoperability of coexisting modes   Network architecture   Flexible modular node architecture   avoiding duplicate functionality through a finer granularity of modules   multimode management   information-driven approach (based on information exchanges)   intelligent aggregation of data/control message   HW/SW interaction between HW and SW modules (advanced HAL) 25
    • Focus areas  Advanced cooperation   Advanced sharing of   Information   spectrum (distributed sensing)   network capabilities (distributed network discovery)   Resources   routing capacity   processing capacity   Services   Cross-layer/cross-node/cross-network cooperation   Collective decisions   Global optimization   minimizing interference   minimizing energy consumption   maximizing QoS (throughput, delay, reliability) 26
    • Focus areas  Market, standard and policy roadmaps   Study transitions in the wireless ecosystem provoked by introduction of cognitive & opportunistic components   exploring future business, policy and standardization frameworks in close collaboration with technical developments   Study of changes in interactions between present and new stakeholders 27
    • Outline  Situating the project  Objectives  Research partners  Milestones  Demos  Regulatory trends & business aspects 28
    • Research partners   IMEC/NES   system architecture exploration and definition (wireless link aspects)   Cognitive Radio Control (MAC) and Sensing solutions   Radio resource management in complex environments   Algorithm development of SoA schemes   Intra-standard (WLAN, WIMAX, 3GPP-LTE, ...) cross-layer controller   Cross-layer energy-aware optimizations   IMEC/WATS   radio coexistence (WBAN-WLAN)   UWB positioning and localization 29
    • Research partners  IBCN   Heterogeneous wireless scenarios in ISM band   Development of adaptive and flexible modular node architecture incorporating advanced hardware abstraction layer (HAL) supporting spectrum awareness   Strategies for advanced information sharing and collaboration (cognitive networking)   Interference avoidance strategies   Dynamic spectrum access 30
    • Research partners  PATS   Seamless handover mechanisms based on sensing   Channel allocation algorithms in a heterogeneous environment   Cooperation on MAC and Network layer in heterogeneous environments   Resource sharing in MAC and Network layer in heterogeneous environments 31
    • Research partners  SMIT   Exploration and evaluation of new cognitive and opportunistic radio frameworks in business, policy and standardization, devoting attention to potential intermediaries and cognitive enablers, in specific:   Intra and inter-firm incentives and bottlenecks for cooperation   Costs of sensing technology   Impact on spectrum use   Analysis of the potential impact of sensing technology and interference on the cost and revenue models through specific application scenarios 32
    • Outline  Situating the project  Objectives  Research partners  Milestones  Demos  Regulatory trends & business aspects 33
    • Research phases   Step 1: Distributed Coexistence of Heterogeneous Networks (2009)   Heterogeneous networks awareness through spectrum sensing   Adaptation to minimize harmful interference based on sensing   Step 2: Cooperative coexistence of heterogeneous Networks (2010)   Communication with heterogeneous networks through SDR   Adaptation to minimize interference based on agreements   Step 3: Collaborative heterogeneous Networks (2011)   Awareness through spectrum sensing   Optimal collaboration to improve user QoS given the spectral (and energy) resource constraints. 34
    • (Demo) milestones   2009: Distributed Coexistence of Heterogeneous Networks   Reference scenario: heterogeneous wireless coexistence in ISM band   Spectrum awareness: sensing functionality   sensing multiple channels and multiple communication technologies in the ISM band   Adaptive modular protocols   distributed interference avoidance algorithm   distributed channel allocation   global routing   optimization of QoS (throughput, reliability)   Integration   Development of HAL incorporating spectrum awareness components   Business Aspects:   Impact of interference (i.e., application QoS degradation) on revenue. Revenue enhancements from improved coexistence. 35
    • IBBT-IMEC experimental facilities  Heterogeneous ISM test environment @ IBBT   Technologies   commercial radios:   IEEE 802.11 (400)   IEEE 802.15.4 (> 200)   802.15.1 (200)   open USRP software radios (10)   IMEC sensing platform (10)   Spectral range: from 1 MHz to 6 GHz   Bandwidth: 1 MHz to 40 MHz   Benchmarking framework   automated experimentation, performances analysis and comparison of cognitive radio & cognitive networking solutions 36
    • Outline  Situating the project  Objectives  Research partners  Milestones  Demos   Sensing interference   Avoiding interference   Minimizing interference  Regulatory trends & business aspects 37
    • Sensing interference   Prototype: 500 MHz to 2.5 GHz Prototype demonstrating sensing capabilities of IMEC Scaldio2B RFIC 500 MHz 2.5 GHz •  40 nm RFIC •  On chip ADC •  100 MHz -> 6 GHz 38 © imec/restricted 2010
    • Avoiding interference Building floor during nighttime Building floor during daytime 39
    • Avoiding interference   Multichannel solution Multi-channel Single channel 40
    • Minimizing interference   2 WSNs in each others range   Suboptimal routing   Suboptimal use of spectrum   Route optimization by   Resource sharing   Back end routing will lead to higher spectrum efficiency   Demo   TinySPOTComm   Communication between 2 different sensor nodes, using identical radios   Global routing   1 routing protocol across sensors and back-end network providing overall connectivity SunSPOT TMote 41
    • Outline  Situating the project  Objectives  Research partners  Milestones  Demos  Regulatory trends & business aspects 42
    • Wireless Networks towards more Flexible Spectrum Management?   Current regulatory system of exclusive, long-term spectrum licensing: inefficiency and high entry barriers   Spectrum underused   Innovation stifled   Customers locked-in   Trend towards technological neutrality & spectrum sharing   Increasing heterogeneity of access technologies (despite LTE)   Huge demand for additional capacity   Digital dividend incites debate on spectrum refarming and sharing   Towards more flexible forms of spectrum management   Dynamic Spectrum Allocation   Spectrum pooling   Secondary markets and change of use 43
    • Cognitive Radio: Technologies to cope with Flexible Spectrum Management  Cognitive Radio   New paradigm for mobile and wireless   Intelligence and autonomy of networks and handsets   Actively monitor context and change behaviour  In context of Flexible Spectrum Management   Spectrum sensing   Spectrum sharing   Dynamic spectrum allocation  May have repercussions on   Spectrum use   Spectrum cost   User experience   Industry architecture 44
    • Regulatory Trends – WAPECS   WAPECS - Wireless Access Policy for Electronic Communications (WAPECS)   A framework for the provision of electronic communications services within a set of frequency bands to be identified and agreed between European Union Member States in which a range of electronic communications networks and electronic communications services may be offered on a technology and service neutral basis, provided that certain technical requirements to avoid interference are met, to ensure the effective and efficient use of the spectrum, and the authorisation conditions do not distort competition. 45
    • Regulatory Trends – WAPECS 46
    • Regulatory Trends – Digital Dividend  Harmonised conditions for the sub-band 790-862 MHz optimised for, but not limited to, fixed/mobile communications networks   Principle: least restrictive technical conditions   Avoid interference   Facilitate cross-border coordination 47
    • Regulatory Trends – Collective Use of Spectrum  CUS allows an undetermined number of independent users and/or devices to access spectrum   in the same range of frequencies   at the same time   in a particular geographic area   under a well-defined set of conditions 48
    • Regulatory Trends – Collective Use of Spectrum 49
    • Potential Business Impact   CAPEX and OPEX reduction for Network Operators/ Spectrum Holders   Reduce costs in spectrum   Sub-lease excess capacity in licensed band   Efficient use of spectrum   Diversification of NO’s service portfolio   Better performance and user experience   Increased QoS   Interoperability between services and networks   Cross-country operation: roaming   Increase of service value 50