Digital Society and Social        Networks Guest Lecture, University of Torino, 14.05.2012                   Lasse Berntze...
About me• Associate Professor at Faculty of Business and Social Science,  Vestfold University College, Norway• Research in...
Content• Mostly based on contemporary research literature  and observations, but also based on:  o Two research projects  ...
Social Media• From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia• Social media are media for social interaction, using  highly accessib...
Web 2.0What is Web 2.0 or “Social Media” about?• Collaboration• Sharing• Interoperability (e.g. through RSS)• User-centere...
Tag Cloud   (from Wikipedia)
Web 2.0• Primarily tools for individuals• But not only..
The Web 2.0 world• Twitter (Social networks, messaging)• Facebook, LinkedIn, Plaxo (Social networks,  messaging)• Blogs (s...
Users of Web 2.0•   (Some sort of timeline)•   Individuals•   Organizations/Social Movements•   Politicians•   Business•  ...
Norwegian usersApplication                      UsersFacebook                                         2.627.700blog.no    ...
New groups of users• National TV 2010:• The older are taking over Facebook
Studying WEB     2.0Some observations from own research
Why is Web 2.0            interesting?• Web 2.0 has regular users• What web sites have regular users?• NOT MANY!• Most web...
Regular users• Newspaper web sites attract regular users• Social media also attract regular users• Some users access such ...
Steps in utilizing social         media
Politicians•   More than individuals..•   Politicians have embraced the internet•   Obama campaign, fundraising•   Norwegi...
Prime minister on    Facebook
Prime minister on    Facebook
Opposition leader on    Facebook
Opposition leader on    Facebook
Not only on national level
Blog•   Web Log•   Website or part of website•   Maintained by individual or group•   Regular entries•   Reverse chronolog...
Why blogging•   Unfiltered opinions•   No discrimination•   Immediate dissemination•   Possible interaction with voters
Blogging project• Municipal elections 2007• Context: Revitalization of democracy through  directly elected mayors• Vestfol...
Candidate blog• Examples:• Candidate  blog• Aggregatio  n
Results/numbers•   31 out of 32 candidates used blogs•   395 articles during the pre-election period•   153 comments from ...
Candidate blog• Another  canditate  blog, where  candidate  responds to  external event.
How to publish in several       channels
What we learned• Dissemination is the biggest motivator• Created some headlines in regional and local  media (Press/local ...
Example..
Municipalities on            Facebook• Two sources:  o Collaboration with City of Larvik, Norway  o Research on uptake by ...
Larvik kommune
Larvik kommune
Kongsvinger kommune
Municipalities on           Facebook• The number of municipalities using Internet as a  communication channel with their c...
Case example: City of      Larvik, Norway• November 2008, discussion and implementation• Target group: Age 18 to 30• Targe...
Mobilization• Oil spill accident: Asking for volunteers• Getting volunteers to read for old people
Interaction• Ask what the citizens want• This is particularly relevant to planning processes
Oops• If you do not have a strategy, you may find yourself  in a strange position• Research on Municipalities on Facebook•...
Case: Grimstad
Case: Horten
The Dark Side of Social            Media•   Everyone is watching you..•   Identity becomes relative..•   EXAMPLE / DEMO•  ...
What’s next• Wiki has a great potential
Example
Example
Example
Example
Example
Example
Campaings andSocial Movementssupported by ICT
Background• The Digital Society – What is happening when  technology is put into use?• Social Media Week, Rome• Take Actio...
Software Patent Directive• During the fall of 2003, the European Commission  proposed a new software patent directive.• Th...
Property tax• In Norway municipalities decide whether or not to  collect property tax.• February 2005, Holmestrand, Norway...
Property tax• One citizen, Tommy Sundstrøm, took the matter in  his own hands.• He downloaded an open source petition  app...
Property tax• The largest party (Labour) changed its position, and  the proposal was abandoned.• The mayor made explicit r...
Research• These two campaigns relied on technology to  mobilize citizens against the political body  responsible for a dec...
Social Movement Theory•   Substantial base of research on Social movements•   Vietnam war, Women liberation, Environmental...
Social movements
Social Movements• Political objective, change the society, long lasting• Campaigns can be short lived, and can have other ...
Social Movements• A protest group is, by definition, a collectivity of  actors who want to achieve their shared goal or  g...
Social Movement Theory• During the last two decades, there has been a growing  consensus that social movements can be expl...
Social Movement Theory• Political opportunities• A political opportunity must exist. In order to  mobilize, there must be ...
Social Movement Theory• Mobilizing structures• There must be some kind of structure that makes it  possible to enroll supp...
Social Movement Theory• Framing processes• There must be a clear message that is well  understood by people deciding to su...
Political CampaignsTwo types of politcalcampaigns:Politicians trying to                         Politicalinfluence the pub...
Campaigns• Bottom up (Initiated by the public)   o Grassroot campaigns   o Campaigns by organizations / groups• Top down (...
Grassroot campaigns• What is the grassroot?• From answers.yahoo.com:"grass roots" means at the individual level.So a grass...
What is new• So we had successful e-campaigns for many years• But what is new, what is the new mechanisms or  new technolo...
Social Media Week
E-campaigning
Impact of Technology
Impact of Technology• Technology has always been important• Technology gives tactical advantages• But technology can also ...
Quality of participation
What does this mean?• Easier to initiate campaigns• Easier and faster community building
Egypt
Egypt• Protest repertoire   o Demonstrations in the streets   o But also through social media• Colleague• Facebook very im...
Set Maria Amelie Free•   The case of Maria Amelie, 25 years old•   Illegal immigrant•   Came to Norway when 15 years old• ...
Set Maria Amelie Free
Set Maria Amelie Free• Facebook• More than 60.000 «likes» in two days• More than 90.000 «likes» in one week
Set Maria Amelie Free• She was sent back to Russia,• But government was pressured into changing the  rules• She is now arr...
Observations• Interrelationsship between media and social media• New ways of utilizing social media
Steps in utilizing social         media
Interrelationsship• No social media campaign lives its own life!• The interrelationship of traditional media and social  m...
New ways• Background information, fact finding• Real time updates   o «She is now put in the police car»   o «Watch TV2 no...
#InternetPart12 Berntzen Day 1
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#InternetPart12 Berntzen Day 1

  1. 1. Digital Society and Social Networks Guest Lecture, University of Torino, 14.05.2012 Lasse Berntzen Vestfold University College Tonsberg, Norway lasse.berntzen@hive.no
  2. 2. About me• Associate Professor at Faculty of Business and Social Science, Vestfold University College, Norway• Research interests: • Digital Society • eDemocracy, eParticipation, eDemocracy • Public Sector Innovation• Research projects: • Webcasting of local council meetings • ePetitions (elektronisk innbyggerinitiativ) (Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development) • Candidate blogs (Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development) • Digital Planning Dialog (Research Council of Norway) • eGovMon (Research Council of Norway) • Consultative (EEA) • eGovMoNet (European Union Commision) • Net-EUCen (European Union Commision)• Also: External expert for Council of Europe and EU
  3. 3. Content• Mostly based on contemporary research literature and observations, but also based on: o Two research projects • Candidate blogs • eGovMon (Facebook use by Municipalities) o Collaboration with Vestfold County municipalities • Larvik, Andebu, Lardal,Tjøme
  4. 4. Social Media• From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia• Social media are media for social interaction, using highly accessible and scalable publishing techniques.• Social media uses web-based technologies to turn communication into interactive dialogues.• Andreas Kaplan and Michael Haenlein also define social media as "a group of Internet-based applications that build on the ideological and technological foundations of Web 2.0, which allows the creation and exchange of user-generated content."…• A common thread running through all definitions of social media is a blending of technology and social interaction for the co-creation of value.
  5. 5. Web 2.0What is Web 2.0 or “Social Media” about?• Collaboration• Sharing• Interoperability (e.g. through RSS)• User-centered design• Fun
  6. 6. Tag Cloud (from Wikipedia)
  7. 7. Web 2.0• Primarily tools for individuals• But not only..
  8. 8. The Web 2.0 world• Twitter (Social networks, messaging)• Facebook, LinkedIn, Plaxo (Social networks, messaging)• Blogs (sharing)• YouTube (sharing videos)• Flicr (sharing photographs)• Wiki (Collaboration, sharing)
  9. 9. Users of Web 2.0• (Some sort of timeline)• Individuals• Organizations/Social Movements• Politicians• Business• Government
  10. 10. Norwegian usersApplication UsersFacebook 2.627.700blog.no 1.016Biip.no 446.849LinkedIn 585.847Origo 277.199Twitter 276.084Numbers are from Halogen.nohttp://www.halogen.no/tjenester/losninger/sosiale-medier/norske-brukere-i-sosiale-medier/(Updated April 18th 2012)
  11. 11. New groups of users• National TV 2010:• The older are taking over Facebook
  12. 12. Studying WEB 2.0Some observations from own research
  13. 13. Why is Web 2.0 interesting?• Web 2.0 has regular users• What web sites have regular users?• NOT MANY!• Most web sites have only sporadic users, e.g. personal or municipal web sites.• Information on demand
  14. 14. Regular users• Newspaper web sites attract regular users• Social media also attract regular users• Some users access such web sites several times a day..
  15. 15. Steps in utilizing social media
  16. 16. Politicians• More than individuals..• Politicians have embraced the internet• Obama campaign, fundraising• Norwegian prime minister• What they use: o Blogs o Facebook o Twitter o YouTube
  17. 17. Prime minister on Facebook
  18. 18. Prime minister on Facebook
  19. 19. Opposition leader on Facebook
  20. 20. Opposition leader on Facebook
  21. 21. Not only on national level
  22. 22. Blog• Web Log• Website or part of website• Maintained by individual or group• Regular entries• Reverse chronological order• Interactive (allows readers to comment)
  23. 23. Why blogging• Unfiltered opinions• No discrimination• Immediate dissemination• Possible interaction with voters
  24. 24. Blogging project• Municipal elections 2007• Context: Revitalization of democracy through directly elected mayors• Vestfold county: 5 municipalities was selected as participants• 32 candidates for mayor
  25. 25. Candidate blog• Examples:• Candidate blog• Aggregatio n
  26. 26. Results/numbers• 31 out of 32 candidates used blogs• 395 articles during the pre-election period• 153 comments from readers (strict rules!)• 4261 unique IP adresses• 75000 page accesses to individual blogs• 25000 page accesses to summaries
  27. 27. Candidate blog• Another canditate blog, where candidate responds to external event.
  28. 28. How to publish in several channels
  29. 29. What we learned• Dissemination is the biggest motivator• Created some headlines in regional and local media (Press/local radio used blogs)• Support organization was necessary• Small impact on election result, but some citizens gave nice feedback
  30. 30. Example..
  31. 31. Municipalities on Facebook• Two sources: o Collaboration with City of Larvik, Norway o Research on uptake by municipalities since February 2009
  32. 32. Larvik kommune
  33. 33. Larvik kommune
  34. 34. Kongsvinger kommune
  35. 35. Municipalities on Facebook• The number of municipalities using Internet as a communication channel with their citizens is steadily increasing.• Data collected by the author in November 2009 showed that 26 Norwegian municipalities were actively using Facebook to interact with and inform their citizens.• Alltogether 73 municipalities were present on Facebook, but the remaining profiles were either established by third-parties or used for employees.
  36. 36. Case example: City of Larvik, Norway• November 2008, discussion and implementation• Target group: Age 18 to 30• Targeted information • First use: To inform about a course for young mothers • DEMO
  37. 37. Mobilization• Oil spill accident: Asking for volunteers• Getting volunteers to read for old people
  38. 38. Interaction• Ask what the citizens want• This is particularly relevant to planning processes
  39. 39. Oops• If you do not have a strategy, you may find yourself in a strange position• Research on Municipalities on Facebook• Very interesting results
  40. 40. Case: Grimstad
  41. 41. Case: Horten
  42. 42. The Dark Side of Social Media• Everyone is watching you..• Identity becomes relative..• EXAMPLE / DEMO• Abuse• Social exclusion
  43. 43. What’s next• Wiki has a great potential
  44. 44. Example
  45. 45. Example
  46. 46. Example
  47. 47. Example
  48. 48. Example
  49. 49. Example
  50. 50. Campaings andSocial Movementssupported by ICT
  51. 51. Background• The Digital Society – What is happening when technology is put into use?• Social Media Week, Rome• Take Action Now – Panel on e-Campaigning o Daria Santucci, University of Turin• Panel discussed e-campaigns• But the story really started back in 2003..
  52. 52. Software Patent Directive• During the fall of 2003, the European Commission proposed a new software patent directive.• The open source community, other organizations and individuals were concerned that the new patent directive would hinder innovation.• A petition web site was set up, and more than 300.000 signatures were collected.• On September 24th 2003, the European Parliament passed the directive, but with significant limits on the patentability of software• On July 6th 2005, the European Parliament rejected a revised proposal with 648 against 14 votes.
  53. 53. Property tax• In Norway municipalities decide whether or not to collect property tax.• February 2005, Holmestrand, Norway (a small city with a population of 10.000 (This is where I live)• The majority coalition of the local government proposed introduction of property tax.• Since property tax had been downplayed as a non- issue during the municipal election campaign in 2003, some citizens felt deceived by the majority coalition.
  54. 54. Property tax• One citizen, Tommy Sundstrøm, took the matter in his own hands.• He downloaded an open source petition application from the Internet, set up his own web site and registered the domain name nok-er- nok.net. (enough-is-enough)• By sending e-mails to friends and acquaintances, asking them to sign, and also to forward the message, he was able to collect around 700 signatures within short time.
  55. 55. Property tax• The largest party (Labour) changed its position, and the proposal was abandoned.• The mayor made explicit references to the e- campaign when explaining the change of position.• Also, the majority coalition fell apart as a result of this abandonment.
  56. 56. Research• These two campaigns relied on technology to mobilize citizens against the political body responsible for a decision.• They were both successful..• But is there any theoretical framework that can be used to explain such campaigns?
  57. 57. Social Movement Theory• Substantial base of research on Social movements• Vietnam war, Women liberation, Environmentalists• Social movements is one type of campaigns• Can Social Movement Theory be used to explain the successes?
  58. 58. Social movements
  59. 59. Social Movements• Political objective, change the society, long lasting• Campaigns can be short lived, and can have other objectives, e.g. a marketing campaign• Formal or informal structure that directs goals and means of the social movement• Campaigns in social movements have a protest repertoire, means, tactics, strategies• Demonstrations, signing a petition..• Is lifespan important anymore? Technology may reduce time to achieve a result.
  60. 60. Social Movements• A protest group is, by definition, a collectivity of actors who want to achieve their shared goal or goals by influencing decisions of target.• What is the difference between a protest group and a social movement o Size o Structure o Longevity• But what is really size, structure and longevity?[Karl-Dieter Opp: Theories of Political Protest and Social Movements,Routledge, 2009]
  61. 61. Social Movement Theory• During the last two decades, there has been a growing consensus that social movements can be explained from three factors: This theory identifies three factors that must be present.• Political opportunities• Mobilizing structures• Framing processes[McAdam, D., McCarthy, J. D., & Zald, M. N. (1996). Introduction: Opportunities,mobilizing structures, and framing processes - toward a synthetic, comparativeperspective on social movements. In D. McAdam, J. D. McCarthy & M. N. Zald(Eds.), Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements (pp. 1-20): CambridgeUniversity Press.]
  62. 62. Social Movement Theory• Political opportunities• A political opportunity must exist. In order to mobilize, there must be a possibility to change current policy. If no one believes it is possible to do something about a problem, it will be impossible to mobilize.
  63. 63. Social Movement Theory• Mobilizing structures• There must be some kind of structure that makes it possible to enroll supporters of the movement. John D. McCarthy (McCarthy 1996) tried to enumerate the range and variety of mobilizing structures. He stressed the importance of existing informal human networks such as kinship and friendship networks for mobilization. But mobilizing structures may also include such things as a computer network. In this context the computer network may help mobilization, by facilitating enrollment and communication. Without mobilizing structures, it will be impossible to mobilize.
  64. 64. Social Movement Theory• Framing processes• There must be a clear message that is well understood by people deciding to support or not to support the movement. If there is no clear message, it will be impossible to mobilize.
  65. 65. Political CampaignsTwo types of politcalcampaigns:Politicians trying to Politicalinfluence the public,e.g. election campaignscampaigns GrassrootCitizens trying toinfluence politicians campaigns
  66. 66. Campaigns• Bottom up (Initiated by the public) o Grassroot campaigns o Campaigns by organizations / groups• Top down (Initiated by politicians) o Election campaigns o Campaigns to get support for a cause
  67. 67. Grassroot campaigns• What is the grassroot?• From answers.yahoo.com:"grass roots" means at the individual level.So a grass roots campaign is one where most of theaction and support is coming from littleguys/individuals at the local level as opposed to atop-down campaign where big money donors andpeople in powerful positions are driving it.
  68. 68. What is new• So we had successful e-campaigns for many years• But what is new, what is the new mechanisms or new technology?
  69. 69. Social Media Week
  70. 70. E-campaigning
  71. 71. Impact of Technology
  72. 72. Impact of Technology• Technology has always been important• Technology gives tactical advantages• But technology can also cause superficial participation• Clicktivism
  73. 73. Quality of participation
  74. 74. What does this mean?• Easier to initiate campaigns• Easier and faster community building
  75. 75. Egypt
  76. 76. Egypt• Protest repertoire o Demonstrations in the streets o But also through social media• Colleague• Facebook very important• Fear wall broke
  77. 77. Set Maria Amelie Free• The case of Maria Amelie, 25 years old• Illegal immigrant• Came to Norway when 15 years old• Finished her M.Sc. Degree in Norway• Expelled by the Norwegian Government
  78. 78. Set Maria Amelie Free
  79. 79. Set Maria Amelie Free• Facebook• More than 60.000 «likes» in two days• More than 90.000 «likes» in one week
  80. 80. Set Maria Amelie Free• She was sent back to Russia,• But government was pressured into changing the rules• She is now arranging documents to get ready for applying for a work permit in Norway.• Gave a lot of focus on how illegal immigrants are treated
  81. 81. Observations• Interrelationsship between media and social media• New ways of utilizing social media
  82. 82. Steps in utilizing social media
  83. 83. Interrelationsship• No social media campaign lives its own life!• The interrelationship of traditional media and social media• Result is often upward spiral
  84. 84. New ways• Background information, fact finding• Real time updates o «She is now put in the police car» o «Watch TV2 now»• Mobilization for other activities o Demonstrations o Amnesty online campaign o Recurring• New phenomen: Like, comment, unlike• Upward spiral effect

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