Ada Lovelace Picture Book Prepared by the Cronegeek - April 2010 For the Women and Computer Class at St. Cloud State Unive...
Ada Lovelace 1815 – 1852 First Computer Programmer
Ada was born  in 1815 in Marleybone, which is part of London.  This map shows how Marleybone is near famous places like Hy...
Ada Lovelace lived during the time when the first railroads were being built.  Here is a map of the railroads in southern ...
Ada’s mother did not want her to become an impractical poet like her father Lord Byron. So Ada had lots of math tutors and...
Charles Babbage – Replace Human Calculations with a Machine Charles Babbage, an English “gentleman scientist” grew increas...
Ada worked from  Babbage’s Analytical Engine to develop a program to calculate Bernoulli numbers.  This is a page from an ...
From an 1823 academic journal describing Babbage’s Analytical Engine – a very early design for what we today would call a ...
“ Ada met Babbage at a party in 1833 when she was seventeen and was entranced when Babbage demonstrated the small working ...
Ada Lovelace – Prophet of the Computer Age Ada Lovelace has been called the “prophet of the computer age.”  She foresaw ma...
What Happens When Enlarge Pic Too Much? Original Pic at Original Size
What Happens When Enlarge Pic Too Much? Here Original Pic Enlarged to full Height of Slide
What Happens When Enlarge Pic Too Much? Enlarged Manually to Completely Fill Screen – Distorting Width
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Draft Ada Lovelace Picture Book

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An attempt to create a children's Golden Book using PowerPoint - to show how Powerpoint can be used in a nontraditional manner to present information. Content focused on Ada Lovelace, who lived in the 1800's and is often called the first computer programmer.

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  • This is a draft intended to illustrate how one could use PowerPoint to make a picture book for children – like the famous Golden Book series. Generally speaking, I used only blank slides so could arrange picture like on a book page and then used a text box to insert short text. The object is to print out the slides as pages in a book. Note this is only a draft. A proper book on Ada Lovelace would contain more info and be more artistic. Last 3 slides are intended to illustrate the dreadful results if one enlarges a picture too much and/or if one enlarges the width but not the height, etc. (fails to keep original aspect ratio). Note how blurry and distorted the picture becomes. To illustrate how one can customize Powerpoint (and to make the slides or pages look more like a children’s picture book), I created my own background. I just used Microsoft Paint as provided with all Windows computers. I set the image size to 640 x 480 which is the proper ratio for Powerpoint slides. I then used the Airbrush tool to create the yellow smudges around the border. I saved the image as a JPG file. In Powerpoint 2007, I clicked on the Design Tab, chose Background Styles (far right of ribbon), then Format Background at bottom of dialog box. Then chose Picture or Texture fill and imported by JPG file. I clicked “Apply to All” and then had this childish border on all my slides.
  • Source of Image: Wikimedia Commons at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ada_Lovelace_1838.jpg. Says public domain because copyright has expired.
  • Map from Google Maps
  • This drawing of the Railroads in southern England as of 1840 was found by doing a search at Wikimedia Commons (http://commons.wikimedia.org) using term Victorian England. URL for this image is http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:S_england_railways_1840.jpg. In public domain because copyright has expired.
  • Source of cartoon: Part of long cartoon strip re Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage created by Sydney Padua. Retrieved 4/21/10 from http://sydneypadua.com/2dgoggles/lovelace-the-origin-2/
  • Source: The Overview page of The Babbage Engine at the Computer History Museum web site. Accessed 4/21/10 at http://www.computerhistory.org/babbage/overview/. Image is from this page also, credited to the Science Museum.
  • Source of Image from page of 1823 academic journal is http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:On_Mr._Babbage%27s_new_machine_for_calculating_and_printing_mathematical_and_astronomical_tables.pdf. Image in public domain since copyright has expired. Will only find this image when searching for Babbage at commons.wikimedia.org if careful to uncheck “for commercial use” at near search box.
  • Source of Image from page of 1823 academic journal is http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:On_Mr._Babbage%27s_new_machine_for_calculating_and_printing_mathematical_and_astronomical_tables.pdf. Image in public domain since copyright has expired. Will only find this image when searching for Babbage at commons.wikimedia.org if careful to uncheck “for commercial use” at near search box.
  • Source of image: http://honorsbrit.wikispaces.com/Women?f=print of women at a party. Looked very old, so I have assumed expired copyright. Bottom of page says “Contributions to http://honorsbrit.wikispaces.com are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 License .” Found 4/21/10 via Google image search using terms Victorian England. Full Source for text entry: Ada Lovelace page of The Babbage Engine from the Computer History Museum web site. Accessed 4/21/10 from http://www.computerhistory.org/babbage/adalovelace/
  • Full Source for text entry: Ada Lovelace page of The Babbage Engine from the Computer History Museum web site. Accessed 4/21/10 from http://www.computerhistory.org/babbage/adalovelace/ Image from Cakewalk Music Creator 5 website at http://www.cakewalk.com/products/musiccreator/instruments.asp
  • Original image of 275 x 275 pixels as found at Flickr [http://www.flickr.com/photos/clvrmnky/3178299616/sizes/o/] under Creative Commons License “Attribution, Non commercial, Share Alike”
  • Original image of 275 x 275 pixels as found at Flickr [http://www.flickr.com/photos/clvrmnky/3178299616/sizes/o/] under Creative Commons License “Attribution, Non commercial, Share Alike” Notice how blurry when enlarged to fill slide – this is 262 % of original size. Method: After moving the small original pic to upper left hand corner, I manually grabbed corner of original pic and dragged to filled screen from top to bottom, leaving white margin on right side. With pic selected, I clicked Picture Tools and “Send to Back” so title of pic would be visible (which I dragged to bottom of slide).
  • Original image of 275 x 275 pixels as found at Flickr [http://www.flickr.com/photos/clvrmnky/3178299616/sizes/o/] under Creative Commons License “Attribution, Non commercial, Share Alike”. After moving the small original pic to upper left hand corner, I manually grabbed corner of original pic and dragged to filled screen from top to bottom, leaving white margin on right side. Then I grabbed the side grab box and dragged to right (distorting the width) so completely fills slide.
  • Draft Ada Lovelace Picture Book

    1. 1. Ada Lovelace Picture Book Prepared by the Cronegeek - April 2010 For the Women and Computer Class at St. Cloud State University DRAFT : To illustrate use of PowerPoint to make a picture book – like the classic children’s Golden Book series . Last three slides illustrate mistakes to be avoided when enlarging images.
    2. 2. Ada Lovelace 1815 – 1852 First Computer Programmer
    3. 3. Ada was born in 1815 in Marleybone, which is part of London. This map shows how Marleybone is near famous places like Hyde Park and the zoo in Regent’s Park
    4. 4. Ada Lovelace lived during the time when the first railroads were being built. Here is a map of the railroads in southern England around 1840. Ada could take the train from London to Southampton or Dover and then take a boat to France.
    5. 5. Ada’s mother did not want her to become an impractical poet like her father Lord Byron. So Ada had lots of math tutors and grew to love mathematics. Ada and her friend Mary Somerville loved to attend science demonstrations together. One day Ada met George Babbage who had written a description of an Analytical Engine which would perform math operations and calculations. Mary was fascinated and years later wrote the first program for this machine – a forerunner of the modern computer.
    6. 6. Charles Babbage – Replace Human Calculations with a Machine Charles Babbage, an English “gentleman scientist” grew increasingly frustrated with all the errors he discovered in a book of astronomical tables and declared, “ I wish to God these calculations had been executed by steam.” His frustration at all the time-wasting and error-prone hand calculations led him to develop plans for an Analytical Engine – a machine which would perform mathematical calculations.
    7. 7. Ada worked from Babbage’s Analytical Engine to develop a program to calculate Bernoulli numbers. This is a page from an academic journal of 1823 describing Babbage’s machine.
    8. 8. From an 1823 academic journal describing Babbage’s Analytical Engine – a very early design for what we today would call a computer. Ada wrote a step-by-step description of the operations that could be performed with punch cards to calculate the Bernoulli numbers. This step by step approach is what we call programming, so Ada is known as the first programmer.
    9. 9. “ Ada met Babbage at a party in 1833 when she was seventeen and was entranced when Babbage demonstrated the small working section of the Engine to her.” according to the Computer History Museum web site .
    10. 10. Ada Lovelace – Prophet of the Computer Age Ada Lovelace has been called the “prophet of the computer age.” She foresaw many possibilities besides math for Babbage’s Analytical Engine. Ada speculated that “the Engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent.” Source: Computer History Museum Today we can use software like Cakewalk Music Creator and the virtual keyboard to compose music on the computer – just like Ada Lovelace predicted .
    11. 11. What Happens When Enlarge Pic Too Much? Original Pic at Original Size
    12. 12. What Happens When Enlarge Pic Too Much? Here Original Pic Enlarged to full Height of Slide
    13. 13. What Happens When Enlarge Pic Too Much? Enlarged Manually to Completely Fill Screen – Distorting Width
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