CULTURAL
AWARENESS
Russell Harlow, Principal Consultant TMA World
2
A Global Village?
Rationale
A Global Village?
A Flat World?
………………………
In reality, not yet!
3
Why?
The Reality
• Our customers, suppliers, colleagues, and strategic partners are increasingly
global and diverse.
We ...
4
The Relationship Challenge in a Diverse World
FEELINGS
BEHAVIORS THOUGHTS
BEHAVIORS THOUGHTS
FEELINGS
Acting
Out Of
Habi...
CULTURE IS…?
6
Culture Matters
• The way we do things around here
• The operating system of the group
• The personality of the group
• ...
7
Our Invisible Teacher
Culture
• Culture teaches us how to
• think, feel, believe and value...
• All groups develop a com...
CULTURES SHARE
THE SAME PROBLEMS;
IT’S THEIR SOLUTIONS
WHICH DIFFER…
9
The complexity of cultural difference
National
Culture
Local Culture
Team
Culture
Industry
Culture
Professional
Culture
...
10
The Danger Zone: Stereotypes
STEREOTYPES
The Closed Circle
Closed to information on
individual variations
TENDENCIES
Th...
11
The Closed Circle
Cultural Stereotypes
ALL Americans are
only interested in
work !
12
The Closed Circle
Cultural Stereotypes
ALL Americans
are only
interested in work
!
Our suppliers in
China never
deliver...
13
The Closed Circle
Cultural Stereotypes
ALL Americans are
only interested in
work !
Our suppliers in
China never
deliver...
14
The Open Circle
Cultural Tendencies
Some Americans
are only interested
in work ..
15
The Open Circle
Cultural Tendencies
Our Chinese
suppliers
occasionally miss
deliveries
Some Americans
are only interest...
16
The Open Circle
Cultural Tendencies
Some of the
Japanese in my
team are very
indecisive
Our Chinese
suppliers
occasiona...
INDIVIDUAL
CULTURAL
INTELLIGENCE
18
Cultural Intelligence
• Being aware, and
• being flexible enough to adapt effectively
• to each new cultural situation
...
19
10 Personal Attributes
Cultural Intelligence
1. Confidence
2. Curiosity
3. Flexibility
4. Mindfulness
5. Objectivity
6....
20
Key Message
Our Challenge
Switching off cultural autopilot
21
Key Message
Our Challenge
Switching off cultural autopilot
Our Solution
Acting from informed choice not habit
22
Cultural Orientations
• Culture is a clue as
to the way a
person or group
may think or
respond
23
Cultural Orientations
• Culture is a clue as to the way a person or group may think
or respond
Culture
A
Culture
B
Cult...
24
Cultural Orientations
• Culture is a clue as to the way a person or group may think
or respond
Culture
A
Culture
B
Cult...
25
Cultural Orientations
• Culture is a clue as to the way a person or group may think
or respond
Culture
A
Culture
B
Cult...
26
Culture
A
Culture
B
Cultural orientation
Cultural Norms
•Not all people are the cultural norm
More similar to the
USA c...
27
Real World reference
Do I lack awareness
of how culture
influences my own
thinking and behavior?
28
Real World reference
Do I lack respect for
and sensitivity to
cultural differences?
29
Real World reference
Am I unable to
recognize and
understand cultural
differences?
30
Real World reference
Do I tend to become
stressed and anxious
in unfamiliar
situations?
31
Real World reference
Do I rely heavily on
cultural stereotypes?
32
The World Through a Cultural Lens
• We don’t see the world as it is, but as we are
• We don’t see others as they are, b...
33
Cultural Levels
34
Cultural Levels
• SURFACE
• clothes
• music
• food
• games THOUGHTS
FEELINGS
THOUGHTS/
FEELINGS
• value systems
• custo...
35
What options do you have?
Strategize
• Each option is
useful in
different
situations
ADAPT
I/we will make small changes...
36
Culture and Communication
Take Away | Best practice
•How to accommodate culture in your visual communication /
presenta...
37
Written Communication
Take Away | Best practice
•How to write clearly and unambiguously
• Consider how a message will ‘...
38
My top ten tips
Cultural intelligence
• Assume differences until similarity is proven
• Understand your own cultural or...
39
Q & A
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Cultural Awareness

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  • Thank you for that kind introduction.Hello and a warm welcome to everyone. I’m going to talk about cultural intelligence in relation to your global working. I’ll be using input derived from a number of interviews we conducted with individual associates and managers in Australia, Bulgaria, Panama, the Philippines, and the U.S., as well as input from my global experiencesOver the next hour, I’m going to . . .
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 3 minPurpose: To demonstrate the need for today’s session on cultural differenceProcess:Click and reveal the first two words. Rhetorically ask “so we’re all one big global village?”Click to reveal ‘Hmmm..’ Briefly having asked the rhetoric questionClick to reveal ‘not yet’ and explain (see additional notes)Tools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Before we begin…’ covers housekeeping rulesLink to: ‘Key message’ Additional notes:Globalization and new communications technologies are powerful integrating forces, but that doesn’t mean the differences between us have disappeared. Economic, political, legal, social, and cultural differences still make a significant impact when working and doing business across borders.
  • My definition – that is shown on the screen – The learned set of assumptions, attitudes, expectations, values, beliefs, and behaviors that distinguish one group of people from another – contains some important words.Let me start with ‘group’. There is no mention of nationality in the definition – at a high level of generalization a ‘nation’ can be thought of as a cultural group, but there are many groups that have a cultural identity. On the next slide, I’ve listed some of these groups that can share common ways of seeing and doinglearned. You are not born with a culture; you learn your cultural orientations through your family, friends, places of worship, the media, schools and so on.Assumptions, attitudes, expectations, values, and beliefs – what is common to all of those is that they tend to be beneath the surface of a culture. They are the driving force, but somewhat hidden from view. Typically, it is what is below the surface – but driving more visible behaviors – that causes the most difficulties. Too often we try to change a behavior without understanding the cultural forces that give meaning to that behavior.You can also see that I’ve put up three simpler definitions that might help understanding.
  • We’ve talked about the importance of cultural intelligence at the high level – knowing what global principles should act as a glue for corporate and functional cohesion, and as guiding principles for teams and individuals. I now want to move down to cultural intelligence at the individual level. I’m going to introduce you to what I call the Cultural RISK Analysis framework, but before I do that I’d like to quickly describe personal attributes I’ve found to be associated with cultural intelligence.
  • In today’s global workplace, many of us are cultural complex - shaped by many cultural influences.Culture is not only about nationality; there are many different layers of culture -- some are more dominant than others. We can switch between our different cultural influences depending on the context, e.g.: home and work.
  • “All generalizations are false, including this one.” - Mark TwainAnother important aspect of cultural intelligence is how we think and talk about cultural differences. Too often, we fall into the trap of stereotypical thinking. A stereotype is a relatively fixed view of another group, and leaves very little room for individual variations. I’m originally from England, and when you hear ‘English’ it’s very likely that your mind will form very fast and stereotypical impressions. Groups do have cultural tendencies, but whatever early impressions we have must always be open to change. Always remember you work with individuals who may demonstrate cultural tendencies, but who cannot be reduced to a cultural type. Relationships aren’t built on interactions between stereotypes, and relationships are critical when working across cultures. When we use stereotypes, we use the very crude reasoning of “You’re American, therefore you are . . .” or “You’re Panamanian, therefore you are . . . ”.
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 2 minPurpose: To highlight how you’re stereotyping when you don’t even think you areProcess: N/ATools: N/AInstructions to delegates: Link from: ‘Cultural stereotypes’ – slide 1 of 2Link to: ‘Individual activity’ – warning screenAdditional notes:Stereotypical statements are characterized by absolute language: all, everyone, alwaysWe don’t work with or sell to ‘cultures’; we deal with individuals
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 2 minPurpose: To highlight how you’re stereotyping when you don’t even think you areProcess: N/ATools: N/AInstructions to delegates: Link from: ‘Cultural stereotypes’ – slide 1 of 2Link to: ‘Individual activity’ – warning screenAdditional notes:Stereotypical statements are characterized by absolute language: all, everyone, alwaysWe don’t work with or sell to ‘cultures’; we deal with individuals
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 2 minPurpose: To highlight how you’re stereotyping when you don’t even think you areProcess: N/ATools: N/AInstructions to delegates: Link from: ‘Cultural stereotypes’ – slide 1 of 2Link to: ‘Individual activity’ – warning screenAdditional notes:Stereotypical statements are characterized by absolute language: all, everyone, alwaysWe don’t work with or sell to ‘cultures’; we deal with individuals
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 1 minPurpose: To highlight the language of tendenciesProcess: Mouse click to reveal some examples that demonstrate the language of generalisationsTools: audio enabled for allInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Describe yourself... ’ – delegates complete the sentence I am a ___ , but I am not a __Link to: ‘Cultural stereotypes vs tendencies’ Additional notes:When we talk about a cultural group we are only talking about central tendencies - our ‘norms’Generalizations have more tentative language: some, occasionally. For example, Some Americans find it hard to balance work and relationships
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 1 minPurpose: To highlight the language of tendenciesProcess: Mouse click to reveal some examples that demonstrate the language of generalisationsTools: audio enabled for allInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Describe yourself... ’ – delegates complete the sentence I am a ___ , but I am not a __Link to: ‘Cultural stereotypes vs tendencies’ Additional notes:When we talk about a cultural group we are only talking about central tendencies - our ‘norms’Generalizations have more tentative language: some, occasionally. For example, Some Americans find it hard to balance work and relationships
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 1 minPurpose: To highlight the language of tendenciesProcess: Mouse click to reveal some examples that demonstrate the language of generalisationsTools: audio enabled for allInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Describe yourself... ’ – delegates complete the sentence I am a ___ , but I am not a __Link to: ‘Cultural stereotypes vs tendencies’ Additional notes:When we talk about a cultural group we are only talking about central tendencies - our ‘norms’Generalizations have more tentative language: some, occasionally. For example, Some Americans find it hard to balance work and relationships
  • We’ve talked about the importance of cultural intelligence at the high level – knowing what global principles should act as a glue for corporate and functional cohesion, and as guiding principles for teams and individuals. I now want to move down to cultural intelligence at the individual level. I’m going to introduce you to what I call the Cultural RISK Analysis framework, but before I do that I’d like to quickly describe personal attributes I’ve found to be associated with cultural intelligence.
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 1.5 minPurpose: A definition of cultural intelligence Process:Present this sentence as a definition of cultural intelligence, highlighting the three key elements: aware, adapt, and newMouse click 1: explain what being aware means to the delegateClick 2: explain what adapt means to the delegateClick 3: explain what being aware means to the delegateTools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/A new cultural situationLink from: ‘Six characteristics of culture’ Link to: ‘Real World reference’Additional notes:Attention: Coming off cultural automatic pilot and observing and listening in the ‘here and now’.Adaptability: Calling on a repertoire of behaviors that support cross-cultural bridge building. Knowledge: Understanding what culture is and its key characteristics, as well as some knowledge of cultural differences.
  • Confidence – not arrogance. Just a belief that things will work outCuriosity – a desire to learn about other ways of seeing and doingFlexibility – an ongoing ability to learn and adaptMindfulness – ability to focus intently on our own and others’ reactionsObjectivity – ability to stay open to what is best in the situationPerceptiveness – ability to recognize differences and their implicationsResilience – ability to recover from setbacks and keep goingRestraint – ability to slow down reactionsRisk-taking – ability to act despite an unknown outcomeTolerance for ambiguity – ability to let go of a need for a quick explanation
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 1 minPurpose: To present key messageProcess:On entry explain to delegates how day to day we act out of habitClick to reveal ‘Our Solution’ and state that Cultural Intelligence and Adaptation are requiredTools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Rationale’ - about the need to develop cultural intelligence Link to: ‘Workshop roadmap’ – overview to today’s sessionAdditional notes: Each day we tend to work out of habit, and are on cultural automatic pilot for most of the time – we do things in a certain way, and see thing things in a certain way. We don’t question or reflect on our cultural habits of mind and body. However, we’ve now entered the age of the global workplace, and we must all increase our ability to adapt to one another to achieve our goals.We can become culturally intelligent by knowing: what we are adapting to, what are we adapting fromBut you must have patience. We can experience confusion and frustration, but those are to be expected. Your job is to remain open, learn, and adapt.Working across cultures can take us into unfamiliar places, and the process of adaptation can take some time. Today is just the start of a journey in the process of developing cultural adaptability and cultural intelligenceThis will require a high level of self awareness.
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Facilitator presentationTiming: 1 minPurpose: To present key messageProcess:On entry explain to delegates how day to day we act out of habitClick to reveal ‘Our Solution’ and state that Cultural Intelligence and Adaptation are requiredTools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Rationale’ - about the need to develop cultural intelligence Link to: ‘Workshop roadmap’ – overview to today’s sessionAdditional notes: Each day we tend to work out of habit, and are on cultural automatic pilot for most of the time – we do things in a certain way, and see thing things in a certain way. We don’t question or reflect on our cultural habits of mind and body. However, we’ve now entered the age of the global workplace, and we must all increase our ability to adapt to one another to achieve our goals.We can become culturally intelligent by knowing: what we are adapting to, what are we adapting fromBut you must have patience. We can experience confusion and frustration, but those are to be expected. Your job is to remain open, learn, and adapt.Working across cultures can take us into unfamiliar places, and the process of adaptation can take some time. Today is just the start of a journey in the process of developing cultural adaptability and cultural intelligenceThis will require a high level of self awareness.
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Real World referenceTiming: 1 minPurpose: To get delegates thinking about their own cultural intelligenceProcess: Mouse click and cycle the questionsAt the end of the last (5th) question ask delegates: if you answered yes to any of the following then you can understand the necessity of today’s workshopTools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Cultural intelligence’ – a definitionLink to: ‘Take away | Cultural Intelligence’Additional notes:These are the five question:Do I lack awareness of how culture influences my own thinking and behavior Do I lack real respect for - and/or sensitivity to - cultural differencesAm I unable to recognize and understand cultural differencesDo I tend to become stressed and anxious in unfamiliar situationsDo I rely heavily on cultural stereotypes
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Real World referenceTiming: 1 minPurpose: To get delegates thinking about their own cultural intelligenceProcess: Mouse click and cycle the questionsAt the end of the last (5th) question ask delegates: if you answered yes to any of the following then you can understand the necessity of today’s workshopTools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Cultural intelligence’ – a definitionLink to: ‘Take away | Cultural Intelligence’Additional notes:These are the five question:Do I lack awareness of how culture influences my own thinking and behavior Do I lack real respect for - and/or sensitivity to - cultural differencesAm I unable to recognize and understand cultural differencesDo I tend to become stressed and anxious in unfamiliar situationsDo I rely heavily on cultural stereotypes
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Real World referenceTiming: 1 minPurpose: To get delegates thinking about their own cultural intelligenceProcess: Mouse click and cycle the questionsAt the end of the last (5th) question ask delegates: if you answered yes to any of the following then you can understand the necessity of today’s workshopTools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Cultural intelligence’ – a definitionLink to: ‘Take away | Cultural Intelligence’Additional notes:These are the five question:Do I lack awareness of how culture influences my own thinking and behavior Do I lack real respect for - and/or sensitivity to - cultural differencesAm I unable to recognize and understand cultural differencesDo I tend to become stressed and anxious in unfamiliar situationsDo I rely heavily on cultural stereotypes
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Real World referenceTiming: 1 minPurpose: To get delegates thinking about their own cultural intelligenceProcess: Mouse click and cycle the questionsAt the end of the last (5th) question ask delegates: if you answered yes to any of the following then you can understand the necessity of today’s workshopTools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Cultural intelligence’ – a definitionLink to: ‘Take away | Cultural Intelligence’Additional notes:These are the five question:Do I lack awareness of how culture influences my own thinking and behavior Do I lack real respect for - and/or sensitivity to - cultural differencesAm I unable to recognize and understand cultural differencesDo I tend to become stressed and anxious in unfamiliar situationsDo I rely heavily on cultural stereotypes
  • FACILITATOR NOTESType of Activity: Real World referenceTiming: 1 minPurpose: To get delegates thinking about their own cultural intelligenceProcess: Mouse click and cycle the questionsAt the end of the last (5th) question ask delegates: if you answered yes to any of the following then you can understand the necessity of today’s workshopTools: N/AInstructions to delegates: N/ALink from: ‘Cultural intelligence’ – a definitionLink to: ‘Take away | Cultural Intelligence’Additional notes:These are the five question:Do I lack awareness of how culture influences my own thinking and behavior Do I lack real respect for - and/or sensitivity to - cultural differencesAm I unable to recognize and understand cultural differencesDo I tend to become stressed and anxious in unfamiliar situationsDo I rely heavily on cultural stereotypes
  • We do not see the world – or others – as they are, but as we are – as we have been shaped by history, religion, language, and environment.The lens we look through influences expectations about, for example:QualityValueLeadershipCommunicationDecision-makingHandling conflictPlanningOur cultural lens is a major influence in shaping our understanding of how the world does or should work.At the bottom of the screen, is perhaps the core of cultural intelligence – Beware of using your cultural perspective in interpreting behavior; learn to interpret measning based on the perspectives of the other cultural group
  • Transcript of "Cultural Awareness"

    1. 1. CULTURAL AWARENESS Russell Harlow, Principal Consultant TMA World
    2. 2. 2 A Global Village? Rationale A Global Village? A Flat World? ……………………… In reality, not yet!
    3. 3. 3 Why? The Reality • Our customers, suppliers, colleagues, and strategic partners are increasingly global and diverse. We must understand – and adapt to – their worldviews so that we can work with them most effectively. • Our competitive advantage is tied increasingly to innovation, problem-solving, and intellectual capital. We must have the diverse perspectives and talents to meet this challenge. • Our ability to attract and retain diverse perspectives and talents is not enough to succeed. These perspectives and talents must be able to work together. We must develop the attitudes, awareness, knowledge, and skills to enable collaboration across borders.
    4. 4. 4 The Relationship Challenge in a Diverse World FEELINGS BEHAVIORS THOUGHTS BEHAVIORS THOUGHTS FEELINGS Acting Out Of Habit Acting Out Of Choice VALUING DIVERSITY CREATING WINS Customers BUSINESS RESULTS Colleagues Partners FROM FOR TO
    5. 5. CULTURE IS…?
    6. 6. 6 Culture Matters • The way we do things around here • The operating system of the group • The personality of the group • Culture: • The learned set of assumptions, attitudes, expectations, values, beliefs, and behaviors that distinguish one group of people from another.
    7. 7. 7 Our Invisible Teacher Culture • Culture teaches us how to • think, feel, believe and value... • All groups develop a common system • which tells us:  What to pay attention to  What we ignore  What’s right  What’s wrong  What’s good  What’s bad
    8. 8. CULTURES SHARE THE SAME PROBLEMS; IT’S THEIR SOLUTIONS WHICH DIFFER…
    9. 9. 9 The complexity of cultural difference National Culture Local Culture Team Culture Industry Culture Professional Culture Organizational Culture Regional Culture Business Unit Culture Generation Sexual Orientation Family Culture Ethnic Culture Gender
    10. 10. 10 The Danger Zone: Stereotypes STEREOTYPES The Closed Circle Closed to information on individual variations TENDENCIES The Open Circle Open to information on individual variations MODIFIABLEFIXED
    11. 11. 11 The Closed Circle Cultural Stereotypes ALL Americans are only interested in work !
    12. 12. 12 The Closed Circle Cultural Stereotypes ALL Americans are only interested in work ! Our suppliers in China never deliver on time!
    13. 13. 13 The Closed Circle Cultural Stereotypes ALL Americans are only interested in work ! Our suppliers in China never deliver on time! Everyone in Japan is indecisive!
    14. 14. 14 The Open Circle Cultural Tendencies Some Americans are only interested in work ..
    15. 15. 15 The Open Circle Cultural Tendencies Our Chinese suppliers occasionally miss deliveries Some Americans are only interested in work …
    16. 16. 16 The Open Circle Cultural Tendencies Some of the Japanese in my team are very indecisive Our Chinese suppliers occasionally miss deliveries Some Americans are only interested in work…
    17. 17. INDIVIDUAL CULTURAL INTELLIGENCE
    18. 18. 18 Cultural Intelligence • Being aware, and • being flexible enough to adapt effectively • to each new cultural situation attention adaptability knowledge
    19. 19. 19 10 Personal Attributes Cultural Intelligence 1. Confidence 2. Curiosity 3. Flexibility 4. Mindfulness 5. Objectivity 6. Perceptiveness 7. Resilience 8. Restraint 9. Risk-taking 10. Tolerance for ambiguity
    20. 20. 20 Key Message Our Challenge Switching off cultural autopilot
    21. 21. 21 Key Message Our Challenge Switching off cultural autopilot Our Solution Acting from informed choice not habit
    22. 22. 22 Cultural Orientations • Culture is a clue as to the way a person or group may think or respond
    23. 23. 23 Cultural Orientations • Culture is a clue as to the way a person or group may think or respond Culture A Culture B Cultural orientation
    24. 24. 24 Cultural Orientations • Culture is a clue as to the way a person or group may think or respond Culture A Culture B Cultural orientation
    25. 25. 25 Cultural Orientations • Culture is a clue as to the way a person or group may think or respond Culture A Culture B Cultural orientation
    26. 26. 26 Culture A Culture B Cultural orientation Cultural Norms •Not all people are the cultural norm More similar to the USA culture than Japan norm
    27. 27. 27 Real World reference Do I lack awareness of how culture influences my own thinking and behavior?
    28. 28. 28 Real World reference Do I lack respect for and sensitivity to cultural differences?
    29. 29. 29 Real World reference Am I unable to recognize and understand cultural differences?
    30. 30. 30 Real World reference Do I tend to become stressed and anxious in unfamiliar situations?
    31. 31. 31 Real World reference Do I rely heavily on cultural stereotypes?
    32. 32. 32 The World Through a Cultural Lens • We don’t see the world as it is, but as we are • We don’t see others as they are, but as we are Beware of using your cultural perspective in interpreting behavior; learn to interpret meaning based on the perspectives of the other cultural group.
    33. 33. 33 Cultural Levels
    34. 34. 34 Cultural Levels • SURFACE • clothes • music • food • games THOUGHTS FEELINGS THOUGHTS/ FEELINGS • value systems • customs • spirituality • religion BEHAVIOURS • language • family structure • politics
    35. 35. 35 What options do you have? Strategize • Each option is useful in different situations ADAPT I/we will make small changes to help our working together BLEND Your way and our way will complement each other CO-CREATE We’ll negotiate a common way that isn’t your way or my way but ours way DIVIDE You do it your way, we’ll do it ours. It doesn’t matter ENFORCE We have to do it this way
    36. 36. 36 Culture and Communication Take Away | Best practice •How to accommodate culture in your visual communication / presentations • Be considerate: • Use color with due thought - color has a cultural meaning, which affects interpretation • Remember that gestures and symbols are not always universal • Implicit cultures use soft communication: polite and indirect, visual and aesthetic • Greeting from the company • Use of indirect words • Humility in philosophy and corporate information • Images and pictures reflecting politeness • Allow silences for reflection time • Explicit cultures use hard communication: direct and to the point, information rich, described by superlatives • Emphasis on facts/ features
    37. 37. 37 Written Communication Take Away | Best practice •How to write clearly and unambiguously • Consider how a message will ‘decode’ into the recipient's mental imagery • Use rich/ lean language and social/ cultural contexts – but avoid using very ‘local’ references • Choose your words/ symbols carefully to ensure clarity • Be aware of how you say things - speed/ mood/ tone – to ensure that your words are not misinterpreted • Be precise – avoid unclear analogies and metaphors
    38. 38. 38 My top ten tips Cultural intelligence • Assume differences until similarity is proven • Understand your own cultural orientations and those of others • Gain cultural knowledge – customs, beliefs, history, etc. • Focus on relating to individuals rather than cultural stereotypes • Listen and observe, think, and then talk • Focus on creating value out of differences rather avoiding mistakes • Be aware of the virtual context: you can easily forget culture when someone is out of sight • Come off cultural auto pilot – stay in the here and now • Stay curious (not furious) about culture..enjoy the journey • REMEMBER – Adapt is not adopt !
    39. 39. 39 Q & A

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