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Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)
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Aristotle's Politics (Lessons)

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Slides on lessons from Aristotle's Politics for an undergraduate course in Political Thought that I taught between 2003-2005.

Slides on lessons from Aristotle's Politics for an undergraduate course in Political Thought that I taught between 2003-2005.

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  • Learning Objectives 1.) To better appreciate the strands in Aristotle’s political thought with practical implications to the conduct of politics and our understanding of democracy (i.e. the type of constitution that is most practicable; the characteristics of a constitution that are workable for most states) 2.) To understand the difference in outlook between Aristotle’s political thought and Plato’s 3.) To become acquainted with Aristotle’s classical typology of forms of rule 4.) To understand the integral parts of the state as discussed by Aristotle (as opposed to its necessary conditions)
  • Transcript

    • 1. ARISTOTLE’S POLITICS: PRACTICAL LESSONS IN POLITICS AND DEMOCRACY
    • 2. Overview <ul><li>Plato v. Aristotle </li></ul><ul><li>Forms of Rule </li></ul><ul><li>Parts of a State </li></ul><ul><li>Practical Lessons in Politics and Democracy </li></ul>
    • 3. A Comparison: Plato and Aristotle <ul><li>Plato was fundamentally an idealist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>i.e. “the ideal state” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Aristotle was more realistic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>there are no ideal states, only existing ones </li></ul></ul>
    • 4. A Comparison: Plato and Aristotle <ul><li>Aristotle’s concern was to understand how states are constituted </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What makes a state “tick”? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Assumed that all states were ordered towards a specific end </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Good v. Bad States </li></ul></ul>
    • 5. Governments: Aristotelian Typology Democracy Polity Many Oligarchy Aristocracy Few Tyranny Monarchy One Perverted Ideal Number of Rulers
    • 6. The Aristotelian Typology Applied Today Democracy Many Oligarchy Aristocracy Few Tyranny Monarchy One Perverted Ideal Number of Rulers Mob Rule
    • 7. Parts of a State <ul><li>Citizenship </li></ul><ul><li>Sovereignty </li></ul><ul><li>Justice </li></ul><ul><li>Law </li></ul><ul><li>Branches of Government </li></ul>
    • 8. Citizenship <ul><li>Not derived from age , birth territory , or system of government </li></ul><ul><li>Rooted in a person’s participation in civic affairs </li></ul><ul><li>Entails the privilege of holding office </li></ul>
    • 9. Sovereignty <ul><li>The state’s supreme power to oblige obedience to its will </li></ul><ul><li>Aristotle uses the term to denote the holding of public office </li></ul><ul><li>He also uses the term to refer to who gets to make binding public decisions </li></ul>
    • 10. Justice <ul><li>The good towards which politics is directed </li></ul><ul><li>Consists of some sort of equality (“ relative equality ”) </li></ul><ul><li>Related to everything that tends to promote the common good </li></ul>
    • 11. Law <ul><li>“ Reason free from all passion ” </li></ul><ul><li>A “ neutral authority ” </li></ul><ul><li>Dynamic concept; includes custom and codified (written) law </li></ul><ul><li>Aristotle distinguishes between the letter and spirit of the law </li></ul>
    • 12. Branches of Government <ul><li>Deliberative </li></ul><ul><li>Executive </li></ul><ul><li>Judicial </li></ul>
    • 13. Practical Lessons <ul><li>There is virtue in decisions being made by collective bodies </li></ul><ul><li>It is important for individuals to have some share in civic affairs </li></ul>
    • 14. More Practical Lessons <ul><li>It is important to distinguish between individuals and institutions/offices </li></ul><ul><li>The law is both substantive and organic </li></ul>
    • 15. Even More Practical Lessons <ul><li>The forms of government most likely to work are those where the middle class is large </li></ul>

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