teachers know their students and how they learn

3,242 views
2,879 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,242
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
103
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Theoretical Perspectives Human development can be divided into a number of different aspects. Physical Development deals with changes in the body Emotional Development is a term generally used for changes in understanding, expression and regulation of feelings Social Development refers to the changes in the way an individual relates to others One theory which explores the effect different charactersitics has on students is Vygotsky ’ s socio-cultural theory. His theory asserts that cognitive development hinges on social interaction, where children learn the culture of their community (ways of thinking and behaving )through social experiences.
  • Student Info: Madison, visual learner in reading recovery group, Year 4. Often seen staring into space throughout lessons and is easily distracted and also distracts others, makes little effort in participating in normal classroom activities. Implications for teaching: Differentiated activities for Madison so that she enjoyed being involved in classroom activities, e.g we used crosswords, find-a- words and celebrity heads games to teach spelling and phonics Theoretical Perspectives: Knowledge of students varied approaches to learning Learning styles – visual, audial, kinesthetic.
  • Student info: Megan is a student in Kindergarten with Cerebal Palsy, she is currently attending Primary school and has two support teachers who assist her throughout the day in all aspects of her school life. Implications for Teaching: Of the highest importance is to create a positive classroom environment that seeks to fully include all students. 2. Resources may be required in different mediums. 3. The Classroom may need to be organised in a way that is thoughtful to the students abilities so the student can access resources required for learning 4. Lessons need to be differentiated in order for all students to be able to learn. 5. Creating an open classroom environment is key, in being able to develop a relationship with the student and for the student to feel included within the classroom and with students. 6. Develop and maintain an individual education program detailing the students level of functioning, a list of the services and resources available to the student and a description of how fully the student will participate in the regular school program Theoretical Perspectives: Sociocultural: Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs.. Where human behavior is motivated by the individual seeking to fulfill a series of hirearchy of needs ranging from lower level survival and safety needs to higher needs of intellectual achievement and self actualisation. Self actualisation is Maslow’s term for ultimate self fulfillment, the realisation of personal potential. In Maslow’s Hirearchy, each of the lower needs must be met in order to fulfill the higher needs. Needs are categorised in the following way: Physiological Needs – eg, breathing, food, water, sleep Safety Needs – eg, security of body, resources, the family, health Love and Belonging needs – eg, friendship, family Esteem Needs – eg, self esteem, confidence, achievement, respect of others, respect by others Self-actualization needs – eg, creativity, problem solving, acceptance of facts, lack of prejudice
  • teachers know their students and how they learn

    1. 1. Element 2: Teachers know their students and how they learn
    2. 2. How well do you know your students? <ul><li>Have you started an individual record of behaviour for each student? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you know each students general school achievement </li></ul><ul><li>In terms of skills , do you know the specific achievement needs of your students? </li></ul><ul><li>What have been some significant aspects of social behaviour for each student? </li></ul><ul><li>Which students have physical handicaps ? </li></ul><ul><li>Which students have emotional difficulties ? </li></ul><ul><li>Which students need particular help in social adjustment ? </li></ul>Byers and Irish (1961) Is there anything else you can think of that teachers need to KNOW?
    3. 3. Teachers know their students and how they learn Knowledge of and respect for the diverse social, cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of students and the effects of these factors on learning Knowledge of the physical, social and intellectual developmental characteristics of the age group(s) of students Knowledge of students varied approaches to learning Knowledge of strategies for addressing student needs Knowledge of how students skills, interests and prior achievements affect learning
    4. 4. anna Knowledge of the physical, social and intellectual developmental characteristics of the age group(s) of students <ul><li>12 years old, Year 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Indigenous background </li></ul><ul><li>Moving to a high school away from her friends </li></ul><ul><li>Diary for her transition into high school </li></ul><ul><li>The most empathetic student in class. </li></ul><ul><li>Class prefect and average intelligence </li></ul>Implications for Teaching Addressing physical and emotional development changes through class lessons, teaching students social development skills through moral lessons and as a teacher learning about the changes that affect students and allowing for that growth and change within the class community Theoretical Perspectives One theory which explores the effect different characteristics has on students is Vygotsky ’ s socio-cultural theory. His theory asserts that cognitive development hinges on social interaction, where children learn the culture of their community (ways of thinking and behaving )through social experiences.
    5. 5. Aleks Knowledge of how students skills, interest and prior achievements affect learning. Theoretical Perspectives Pre-Mack Principal – First, do what I want you to do, then you can do what you want to do <ul><li>Implications for Teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the students interests </li></ul><ul><li>Planning for the students strengths and weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Setting Rich tasks aimed at targeting students interests e.g., soccer </li></ul><ul><li>Explicit instruction on concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Positive reinforcement including rewarding behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>11 years old </li></ul><ul><li>Gregarious </li></ul><ul><li>Russian background </li></ul>
    6. 6. Salmon Knowledge of and respect for the diverse social, cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of students and the effects of these factors on learning. Theoretical Perspectives Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Human behavior is motivated by individual seeking to fulfill a series or hierarchy of needs from basic survival and safety to higher levels needs of intellectual achievement and self actualization <ul><li>Implications for Teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding the different cultures within the school </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition of the cultural practices and acknowledging specific days throughout the year, e.g. Ramadan </li></ul><ul><li>Exercising duty of care </li></ul><ul><li>Communication with family/caretakers </li></ul><ul><li>10 years old </li></ul><ul><li>Islamic </li></ul>
    7. 7. Madison Knowledge of students varied approach to learning Theoretical Perspectives Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences Theory- * Kind of human abilities and an individual might have strengths or weaknesses in one or many of the areas <ul><li>Implications for Teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiated activities using pictures, graphic organizers </li></ul><ul><li>Use of colour/symbols to show patterns or relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Use of games to engage and motivate </li></ul><ul><li>8 years old </li></ul><ul><li>Visual learner </li></ul><ul><li>Often loses focus with auditory tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Assessments are difficult as student finds it hard to recall information that hasn ’ t been “ viewed ” </li></ul>
    8. 8. Megan Knowledge of strategies for addressing student needs <ul><li>Implications for Teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusive positive classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Resources eg, cards instead of writing </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiated lessons </li></ul><ul><li>Making sure that students are aware of disability and how they can include Megan </li></ul><ul><li>Individual education program detailing student level of functioning, services and resources available and how the student will participate in the school program </li></ul>Theoretical Perspectives Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences Theory- * Kind of human abilities and an individual might have strengths or weaknesses in one or many of the areas <ul><li>Kindergarten Student </li></ul><ul><li>Cerebal Palsy </li></ul><ul><li>Two Support Teacher Learning Assistance (STLA) </li></ul>
    9. 9. Here ’ s to the kids Here’s to the kids who are different; the kids who don’t always get A’s, the kids who have ears twice the size of their peers’, or noses that go on for days. Here’s to the kids who are different, the kids who are just out of step, the kids they all tease, who have cuts on their knees and whose sneakers are constantly wet. Here’s to the kids who are different, the kids with a mischievous streak, for when they have grown, as history has shown, it’s their difference that makes them unique!
    10. 10. References <ul><li>Gardner, Howard. (1983) &quot;Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences.&quot; New York: Basic Books. </li></ul><ul><li>Maslow, A, H. (1968). Toward a Psychology of Being. New York: D. Van Nostrand Company. </li></ul><ul><li>Metcafe. (2011). Do you know who I am? [Video] Retrieved October 2 from http://www.metacafe.com/watch/6047/do_you_know_who_i_am/. </li></ul><ul><li>Premack, D. (1959). Toward empirical behavior laws: I. Positive reinforcement. Psych Rev. , 66 , 219-233. </li></ul><ul><li>Vygotsky, L.S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. New York: President and fellows of Harvard college. </li></ul><ul><li>Wolfe, D. (1982).Here ’ s to the kids. Retrieved October 2, 2011 from http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson115.shtml . </li></ul>

    ×