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Teacher Effectiveness: What do we know?
Teachers matter.  Improving teacher quality is the single most effective way to improve student outcomes.
Teacher Quality What is it?  How is it defined under NCLB? How does teacher quality influence student learning?  Knowing w...
<ul><li>There are much larger  differences among our teachers than we ever knew.  Those differences matter a  great deal i...
10 Point Average Difference Between Top and Bottom Teachers Source: Gordon, R., Kane, T.J., and Staiger, D.O. (2006).  Ide...
Comparing the Average Student in the Classrooms of Bottom Quartile and Top Quartile Teachers Gordon, R., Kane, T.J., and S...
Students in Dallas Gain More in Math with Effective Teachers: One Year Growth  From 3 rd -4 th  Grade Source :  Heather Jo...
LOW ACHIEVING STUDENTS IN TN GAIN MORE WITH EFFECTIVE TEACHERS:  One Year Growth Sanders and Rivers,  Cumulative and Resid...
Cumulative Teacher Effects On Students’ Math Scores in Dallas (Grades 3-5) Source:  Heather Jordan, Robert Mendro, and Das...
<ul><li>The impact of effective teachers overwhelms almost every other “intervention,” including class size reduction </li...
<ul><li>Good teachers are not fairly distributed </li></ul>
More Classes in High-Poverty Secondary Schools Taught by Out-of-Field* Teachers High- Poverty Low-poverty Note: High Pover...
Math Classes at High-Poverty and High- Minority Schools More Likely to be Taught  by Out of Field* Teachers Note: High Pov...
Students at High-Minority Schools More Likely to Be Taught By Novice* Teachers *Novice teachers are those with three years...
1998 by The Education Trust, Inc.
Tennessee:  High poverty/high minority schools have fewer of the “most effective” teachers and more  “least effective” tea...
Low-Achieving Students are More Likely to be Assigned to Ineffective Teachers than Effective Teachers Source :  Sitha Babu...
<ul><li>We don’t know nearly enough about the characteristics of effective teachers . . . and even less about their practi...
In last few years, volume of studies has grown rather dramatically.  And we are beginning to learn some of the basics.
What are we learning? <ul><li>What Seems to Matter </li></ul><ul><li>Experience, but only for first year or two; </li></ul...
But there is still a lot more digging to do, if only to understand what seem to be exceptions…
For example, while novices usually aren’t as good as teachers with at least 3 years experience…. <ul><li>Studies in Louisi...
And within any “type” of teacher, there is a wide range of effectiveness.
Similar Effectiveness,  Regardless of Certification Source: Gordon, R., Kane, T.J., and Staiger, D.O. (2006).  Identifying...
Some nuances… <ul><li>Traditional a little better with younger children, especially in reading; </li></ul><ul><li>Alternat...
Effectiveness More Important  than Certification  <ul><li>“The difference between the  75 th  percentile </li></ul><ul><li...
The Combined Impact of Teacher and School on Achievement After Two Years <ul><li>Average Teacher in an Average School </li...
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Teacher Quality Power Point

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Teacher Quality Power Point

  1. Teacher Effectiveness: What do we know?
  2. Teachers matter. Improving teacher quality is the single most effective way to improve student outcomes.
  3. Teacher Quality What is it? How is it defined under NCLB? How does teacher quality influence student learning? Knowing what you know about the influence of teacher quality on student learning, how does this impact your theory of action?
  4. <ul><li>There are much larger differences among our teachers than we ever knew. Those differences matter a great deal in student learning. </li></ul>
  5. 10 Point Average Difference Between Top and Bottom Teachers Source: Gordon, R., Kane, T.J., and Staiger, D.O. (2006). Identifying Effective teachers Using Performance on the Job. Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution.
  6. Comparing the Average Student in the Classrooms of Bottom Quartile and Top Quartile Teachers Gordon, R., Kane, T.J., and Staiger, D.O. (2006). Identifying Effective teachers Using Performance on the Job. Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution. 10
  7. Students in Dallas Gain More in Math with Effective Teachers: One Year Growth From 3 rd -4 th Grade Source : Heather Jordan, Robert Mendro, and Dash Weerasinghe, The Effects of Teachers on Longitudinal Student Achievement , 1997.
  8. LOW ACHIEVING STUDENTS IN TN GAIN MORE WITH EFFECTIVE TEACHERS: One Year Growth Sanders and Rivers, Cumulative and Residual Effects of Teachers on Future Academic Achievement, 1998.
  9. Cumulative Teacher Effects On Students’ Math Scores in Dallas (Grades 3-5) Source: Heather Jordan, Robert Mendro, and Dash Weerasinghe, The Effects of Teachers on Longitudinal Student Achievement , 1997. Beginning Grade 3 Percentile Rank= 55 Beginning Grade 3 Percentile Rank= 57
  10. <ul><li>The impact of effective teachers overwhelms almost every other “intervention,” including class size reduction </li></ul>
  11. <ul><li>Good teachers are not fairly distributed </li></ul>
  12. More Classes in High-Poverty Secondary Schools Taught by Out-of-Field* Teachers High- Poverty Low-poverty Note: High Poverty school-75% or more of the students are eligible for free/reduced price lunch. Low-poverty school -15% or fewer of the students are eligible for free/reduced price lunch. National *Teachers with neither certification nor major. Data for secondary-level core academic classes (Math, Science, Social Studies, English) across USA. Source : Analysis of 2003-2004 Schools and Staffing Survey data by Richard Ingersoll, University of Pennsylvania 2007.
  13. Math Classes at High-Poverty and High- Minority Schools More Likely to be Taught by Out of Field* Teachers Note: High Poverty school-75% or more of the students are eligible for free/reduced price lunch. Low-poverty school -15% or fewer of the students are eligible for free/reduced price lunch. High minority school-75% or more of the students are Black, Hispanic, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian or Pacific Islander. Low-minority school -10% or fewer of the students are non-White students. *Teachers with neither certification nor major. Data for secondary-level core academic classes (Math, Science, Social Studies, English) across USA. Source : Analysis of 2003-2004 Schools and Staffing Survey data by Richard Ingersoll, University of Pennsylvania 2007.
  14. Students at High-Minority Schools More Likely to Be Taught By Novice* Teachers *Novice teachers are those with three years or fewer experience. Source : Analysis of 2003-2004 Schools and Staffing Survey data by Richard Ingersoll, University of Pennsylvania 2007. Note: High minority school-75% or more of the students are Black, Hispanic, American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian or Pacific Islander. Low-minority school -10% or fewer of the students are non-White students.
  15. 1998 by The Education Trust, Inc.
  16. Tennessee: High poverty/high minority schools have fewer of the “most effective” teachers and more “least effective” teachers Source : Tennessee Department of Education 2007. “Tennessee’s Most Effective Teachers: Are they assigned to the schools that need them most?” http://tennessee.gov/education/nclb/doc/TeacherEffectiveness2007_03.pdf Note: High Poverty/High minority means at least 75% qualify for FRPL and at least 75% are minority.
  17. Low-Achieving Students are More Likely to be Assigned to Ineffective Teachers than Effective Teachers Source : Sitha Babu and Robert Mendro, Teacher Accountability: HLM-Based Teacher Effectiveness Indices in the Investigation of Teacher Effects on Student Achievement in a State Assessment Program, AERA Annual Meeting, 2003.
  18. <ul><li>We don’t know nearly enough about the characteristics of effective teachers . . . and even less about their practices. </li></ul>
  19. In last few years, volume of studies has grown rather dramatically. And we are beginning to learn some of the basics.
  20. What are we learning? <ul><li>What Seems to Matter </li></ul><ul><li>Experience, but only for first year or two; </li></ul><ul><li>Content knowledge, at least in math and science; </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers’ own test performance. </li></ul><ul><li>What Doesn’t Seem to Matter </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional vs. Alternate Certification; </li></ul><ul><li>Masters Degrees; </li></ul><ul><li>Experience beyond the first several years. </li></ul>
  21. But there is still a lot more digging to do, if only to understand what seem to be exceptions…
  22. For example, while novices usually aren’t as good as teachers with at least 3 years experience…. <ul><li>Studies in Louisiana show that some colleges produce teachers who are more effective in year one, than veteran teachers in same district; </li></ul><ul><li>Recent study in North Carolina found Teach For America Corps Members who taught in secondary schools as effective as veteran teachers in those same schools. </li></ul>
  23. And within any “type” of teacher, there is a wide range of effectiveness.
  24. Similar Effectiveness, Regardless of Certification Source: Gordon, R., Kane, T.J., and Staiger, D.O. (2006). Identifying Effective teachers Using Performance on the Job. Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution.
  25. Some nuances… <ul><li>Traditional a little better with younger children, especially in reading; </li></ul><ul><li>Alternates a little better with older children, especially in math; </li></ul><ul><li>Most differences in lower grades wash out by year 3. </li></ul>
  26. Effectiveness More Important than Certification <ul><li>“The difference between the 75 th percentile </li></ul><ul><li>teacher and the 50 th percentile teacher for all three groups of teachers was roughly five times as large as the difference between the average certified teacher and the average uncertified teacher.” </li></ul>Three groups = traditionally certified, alternatively certified, and uncertified Gordon, R., Kane, T.J., and Staiger, D.O. (2006). Identifying Effective teachers Using Performance on the Job. Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution.
  27. The Combined Impact of Teacher and School on Achievement After Two Years <ul><li>Average Teacher in an Average School </li></ul><ul><li>Ineffective Teacher in an Ineffective School </li></ul><ul><li>Most Effective Teacher in Most Effective School </li></ul><ul><li>50 th percentile </li></ul><ul><li>3 rd percentile </li></ul><ul><li>96 th percentile </li></ul>- Rick DuFour

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