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Surveyor Project Meeting, Tallin
 

Surveyor Project Meeting, Tallin

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Presentation to the EIE-Surveyor Project General Meeting on Task 1.1 application of the Tuning Methodology to the EIE discipline set

Presentation to the EIE-Surveyor Project General Meeting on Task 1.1 application of the Tuning Methodology to the EIE discipline set

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Surveyor Project Meeting, Tallin Surveyor Project Meeting, Tallin Presentation Transcript

  • Task 1.1 Tuning Methodology applied to EIE across Europe Tony Ward, Jozef Jasenek University of York, Director CETL Enterprise Department of Electronic s
  • Introduction
    • Research methodology
    • Sample (reported here) - Demographic Analysis
    • Generic Competences analysis
    • Specific Competences analysis
    • So what?
    • Where are we now
    • Project Outcomes
  • Research Methodology
    • Design Questionnaires 
    • Data Collection (On-line, Paper, Email) 
    • Data Entry & Validation - In progress
    • Data Analysis (SPSS) - Pilot analysis undertaken
    • Reporting & Dissemination
  • The sample reported here
    • Student sample n = 1,783 + Paper based: (approx 1,100 1,300)
    • Countries n = 22
      • Slovak Republic n = 308 }
      • Greece N = 240 }
      • Hungary n = 218 } 65.5% Total
      • Poland n = 205 }
      • Bulgaria n = 197 }
    • 83.3% Male, 16.7% Female, 36 refused
    • 72% Undergraduates, 26.8% Postgraduates
    • Age:
      • 32.2% < 20
      • 66.6% 21 < n < 30
  • Questionnaire Structure
    • Demographic Questions
    • Generic Competence questions
    • Language questions
    • Specific Competence questions
    • Perceived importance & perceived level of development
      • (4 point Likert scale)
  • Generic Questions
    • “ Do you feel that the degree is preparing you adequately for employment?” Approx equal Bachelor & Masters
      • Very much 10.1% }
      • Much 42.0% } 87.4% positive response
      • Some 35.4% }
      • Female mean: 2.58, Male mean 2.52 (1..5) - Not good!
    • “ How would you rate the employment potential of your degree?”
      • Female mean: 2.25, Male mean: 2.16 (Between Some & Little)
    • Further analysis needed to try to understand
  • Generic Skills Analysis 1 3 = Considerable, 4 = Strong 3.32 5. Knowledge of a second language 3.37 4. Teamworking 3.38 3. Capacity for applying knowledge in practice 3.40 2. Elementary computing skills 3.43 1. Problem solving Mean across all students (n=1649) Generic competence (Importance)
  • Generic Skills Analysis 2 Mean across all students (n=1649) Generic competence (Importance) 2.55 32. Understanding of cultures and customs of other countries 2.69 31. Appreciation of diversity and multiculturality 2.71 30. Appreciation of ethical issues 2.8 29. Patents and Intellectual Property Rights 2.9 28. Research skills
  • Generic Skills Analysis 3 2.87 5. Capacity to learn 2.88 4. Basic general technical knowledge of the profession of your work 2.88 3. Problem solving 2.90 2. Ability to work autonomously 3.17 1. Elementary computing skills Mean across all students (n=1649) Generic Competence (Development)
  • Generic Skills Analysis 4 2.08 32. Understanding of cultures and customs of other countries 2.27 31. Leadership 2.30 30. Appreciation of diversity & multiculturality 2.31 29. Appreciation of ethical issues 2.37 28. Patents and IPR Mean across all students (n=1649) Generic Competence (Development)
  • Generic Skills Analysis 5 0.64 5. Capacity for applying knowledge in practice 0.64 4. Leadership 0.70 3. Ability to work in an international context 0.72 2. Capacity for generating new ideas (creativity) 0.83 1. Knowledge of a second language Mean across all students (n=1649) Generic Competence (Difference)
  • Generic Skills Analysis 6 0.23 32. Elementary computing skills 0.24 31. Grounding in basic knowledge of the profession of your work area 0.32 30. Basic general technical knowledge of the profession of your work 0.35 29. Research skills 0.38 28. Oral and written communications in native language Mean across all students (n=1649) Generic Competence (Difference)
  • Specific Skills Analysis 1 3.14 5. Ability to apply a systems approach 3.20 4. Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of scienfici facts, concepts, theories, principle & methods necessary to underpin the engineering discipline 3.22 3. Ability to demonstrate practical engineering skills 3.23 2. Ability to work in a group on a major project 3.27 1. Ability to apply appropriate quantitative methematical, science and engineering methods and computer software to solve engineering problems Mean across all students (n=1585) Specific Competence (Importance)
  • Specific Skills Analysis 2 2.76 28. Ability to demonstrate an appreciation of the wider multidisciplinary engineering context and its underlying principle 2.77 27. Ability to demonstrate awareness of the nature of intellectual property and contractual issues 2.77 26. Ability to demonstrate knowledge of management techniques which may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context 2.81 25. . Ability to demonstrate awareness of the legal framework relevant to engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety, and risk (including environmental risk) issues 2.82 24. Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the commercial and economic context Mean across all students (n=1585) Specific Competence (Importance)
  • Specific Skills Analysis 3 2.70 5. Ability to apply a systems approach to engineering problems 2.72 4. Ability to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling technique 2.84 3. Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of scientific facts, concepts, theories, principles and methods necessary to underpin the engineering discipline 2.89 2. Ability to apply appropriate quantitative mathematical, science and engineering methods and computer software to solve engineering problems 2.92 1. Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of mathematics principles and methods necessary to underpin the engineering discipline Mean across all students (n=1585) Specific Competence (Development)
  • Specific Skills Analysis 4 2.29 28. Ability to demonstrate awareness of the legal framework … 2.34 27. Ability to demonstrate knowledge of management techniques which may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic contex 2.35 26. Ability to demonstrate awareness of the nature of intellectual property and contractual issues 2.35 25. Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the commercial and economic context 2.35 24. Ability to understand and take into account social, environmental, ethical, economic and commercial considerations affecting the exercise of engineering judgement Mean across all students (n=1585) Specific Competence (Development)
  • Factor Analysis (Generic) 1
    • Rotated Varimax Factor Analysis
      • 4 factors (48.4% total variance)
    • Rated Importance similar but not identical to Level of Development
    • “ Personal Competence” (6 items, 16.1% variance,  = 0.83)
      • “ Ability to work autonomously”
      • “ Will to succeed”
      • “ Concern for quality”
      • “ Problem solving”
      • “ Project design and management”
      • “ Capacity for generating new ideas (creativity)”.
  • Factor Analysis (Generic) 2
    • “ Interpersonal Competence” (3 items, 11.3% variance,  = 0.63)
      • “ Interpersonal skills”
      • “ Teamworking”
      • “ Oral and written communications in your native language”
    • “ Diversity Awareness” (3 items, 10.7% variance,  = 0.72 )
      • “ Understanding of cultural and customs of other countries”
      • “ Appreciation of ethical issues”
      • “ Appreciation of diversity and multiculturality”.
    • “ Professional Competence” (4 items,  = 0.74 )
      • “ Grounding in basic knowledge of the profession of your work area”
      • “ Basic general technical knowledge of the profession of your work area”
      • “ Capacity for analysis and synthesis”
      • “ Capacity for applying knowledge in practice”.
  • So What?
    • Student (Input data)
      • Understanding of what they think are important
      • Alignment of perception of importance of competences compared to their perception of level of development
    • Academic & Employment Institutions (Abstracted results)
      • Who thinks which competences are important
      • Supply demand alignment
    • Policy level (National & European) (Analysed implications)
      • Picture of important competences
      • Supply Demand alignment
  • Where are we now?
    • On-line questionnaires closed
    • Paper based being entered
    • Datasets to be collated (not a large job)
    • Final analysis (SPSS)
    • Write report
      • Executive summary report
      • Full technical report (full results)
  • Project Outcomes
    • A full data analysis
    • Report on survey findings
      • Report
      • On-line report (on web site)
      • Academic publications
  • Dissemination (Need contacts & addresses)
    • Europe
      • EU, SEFI, FEANI, CEDEFOP(?), Tuning Project, …
      • Conferences: EAEEIE, SEFI, ITHET, …
    • Others: IEEE Educational Portal, BEST
    • Country Specific
      • UK:
        • IET
        • HEA Subject Centre
        • EPC (Engineering Professors Council)
        • EC (Engineering Council)
        • RAE (Royal Academy of Engineering)
        • BCS (British Computer Society)
  • Thanks
    • Questions?