Michael Hsieh (UC Berkley Extension) - Conférence TechnoArk 2013

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Présenté le 25 janvier 2013 lors de la Conférence TechnoArk 2013 à Sierre (CH) - "Vers un Internet de l'énergie"-> www.technoark.ch/conference .

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Michael Hsieh (UC Berkley Extension) - Conférence TechnoArk 2013

  1. 1. Smart Grid in the Era of Consumerization of Nearly Everything Prepared and Edited by Michael M. Hsieh, Ph.D.Instigator and Instructor of Smart Grid Technology Course Suites at UC Berkeley Extension http://extension.berkeley.edu/spos/smartgrid.htmlConference Technoark All Rights Reserved. 1 2013-Jan-25
  2. 2. Modernization of The Electric Grid SMES:Today’s Tomorrow’s Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage DG: DistributedElectricity … Choices … Generation Power park e- Fuel Cell Hydrogen Wind Storage Remote Farms Industrial DG Loads Fuel Cell Rooftop Photovoltaics e- SMES Smart Substation Load as a resource Combined Heat and Power Conference Technoark Reference:T. Basso, NREL, October 20, 2005 2 2013-Jan-25
  3. 3. The Consumerization of Smart Energy• Bring Your Own Energy and Equipment (BYOE) – Consumer generated energy makes Consumers the Prosumers.• Crowd Sourced Technology – Consumer Owned Generation, Solar Power Purchase Agreement (PPA), Community Choice Aggregation (CCA), etc., use technology not supplied by the traditional utility industry.• Plug and Play – All will be plugged in and tied to the grid and they must interoperate and play as intended.Conference Technoark Reference: Smart Grid Technology Course Suite, 3 2013-Jan-25 UC Berkeley Extension, Michael M. Hsieh, 2012
  4. 4. The Democratization of Smart Energy • Buy Your Own Energy (BYOE) – Solar Power Purchase Agreement (PPA), Community Choice Aggregation (CCA), etc., procure energy not supplied by the traditional utility industry. • Crowd Sourced Technology – Smart microgrids, PPA, and CCA, use facilities not built by the traditional utility industry. • Plug and Play – All will be plugged in and tied to the grid and they must interoperate and play as intended.Conference Technoark Reference: Smart Grid Technology Course Suite, 4 2013-Jan-25 UC Berkeley Extension, Michael M. Hsieh, 2012
  5. 5. An Example of Self-Generation System Micro-Generation systems can be either grid-connected or off-grid.Conference Technoark Reference: Randy H. Katz, UC Berkeley, August 31, 2009 5 2013-Jan-25
  6. 6. Metro Area Voltage Swells and Sags Challenges and Opportunities• Network State • Condition Based Monitoring • Customer Engagement• Asset Health Mgmt • Distribution Automation • Outage Management• Asset Management • Demand Side Management • Volt VAR Control• Enterprise Resource Mgmt • Workforce Management Conference Technoark Reference: Ankur Varma, Silver 6 2013-Jan-25 Spring Networks, March 6, 2012
  7. 7. Solar Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) The Purchaser only bought the Power. Not the SystemConference Technoark Reference: Matt Gudorf, UC Irvine, 2008 7 2013-Jan-25
  8. 8. Solar PPA’s Power Delivery Method Buying Leasing Solar PPA Equipment Equipment Upfront Capital Yes Little or None None Maintenance Yes Yes None Required Performance Yes Yes None Risk System Expertise Yes Yes None Required Purchase Yes Yes or Re-Lease None RequiredConference Technoark Reference: Matt Gudorf, UC Irvine, 2008 8 2013-Jan-25
  9. 9. Paying for the Electricity Transmission costs are the smallest part of a consumer’s electric bill – 7 percent on average. The remaining parts of an electric bill can be attributed to costs from: • Generation – 68% • Distribution – 24%Conference Technoark http://www.modernizethegrid.com/modernize-the-grid/ 9 2013-Jan-25
  10. 10. Example: CCA in Collaboration with IOU CCA CCA Responsible for IOU Responsible for Home or Business buying and building delivering energy, energy supplies repairing lines, and serving customersCCA: Community Choice AggregationIOU: Investor Owned UtilityPG&E: Pacific Gas & Electric, Northern California, USAConference Technoark Reference: Lean Energy US, October, 2011 10 2013-Jan-25
  11. 11. Campus Level Smart Microgrid Examples Site of Microgrid Attributes Load: 42 MW Peak UC San Diego1 Self-Generation: 37 MW Peak Stanford Load: 50 MW peak University2 Self-Generation: 30 MW peak Load: 11 MW peak A Shipyard3 Savings in Electric Bill: ~$23M in 10 years An Engineering Load: 3.5 MW peak Center3 Savings in Electric Bill: ~$10M in 10 years Microgrids can be viewed as an energy consumer having its own utility company. 1. Byron Washom, UCSD, 2011 Conference Technoark 2. Joseph Stagner, Stanford University, 2012 11 2013-Jan-25 3. Pike Research, 2012
  12. 12. Solar Power at Hopkins Parking Structure at UC San Diego Conference Technoark http://www.marketplace.org/topics/sustainability/power-building-bigger-batteries 12 2013-Jan-25
  13. 13. Segmentation of US Energy ConsumersSegments % of Total Attributes and Opportunities Population Members of this group are most protective of theConcerned 31% environment and supportive of smart grid initiatives. They Greens are highly likely to participate in energy management programs. They can be viewed as Early Adopters. This group doesn’t know much about smart grid but is Young 23% interested in learning about its potential for America environmental benefits and cost savings. This group of consumers has the highest income per Easy 20% capita comparing with all other segments. They are very Street comfortable with their current life style and are reluctant to change their personal behaviors. This group of consumers is frugal and has a do-it-yourselfDIY & Save 16% (DIY) life style. Their biggest concern is providing for their family, not the global environmental issues. This group tends to be older, set in their ways and do notTraditional 11% see the need for energy reform. Factsheet, and education regarding smart meter accuracy, health, and privacy could perhaps offset concerns with the technology.Conference Technoark Reference: Smart Grid Consumer Collaborative, January 23, 2012 13 2013-Jan-25
  14. 14. Traditional Biz Model of Utility Industry • US Utility industry have built, operated, and maintained a mission critical infrastructure 24x7x365 for 130+ years. • Utility industry produce, market, and deliver “workhorse electrons” to consumer’s doorsteps at a regulated “price per kilowatt-hour” like Entitled Commodity. • Utility industry carry heavy inventory of asset, skill set, and personnel. • Not a very healthy nor readily sustainable business model in the 21st century.Conference Technoark Reference: Smart Grid Technology Course Suite, 14 2013-Jan-25 UC Berkeley Extension, Michael M. Hsieh, 2010
  15. 15. Could Utility Industry Take a New Biz Model?• Utility Generated and Utility Operated-and- Maintained Energy offered as a “societal” Service like Fire Service, Medical Service, Police Service, Societal Defense Service (e.g., US National Guard of each individual state) etc.• Service premium charged according to the different levels of service agreement – hint, similar to the way the insurance industries work in US.• This would be a model for the consumerized and democratized Smart Energy industry.Conference Technoark Reference: Smart Grid Technology Course Suite, 15 2013-Jan-25 UC Berkeley Extension, Michael M. Hsieh, 2012
  16. 16. Need New Workforce for Smart Energy Industry • Boots on the Ground – Take care of the smart grids and smart microgrids 24x7x365 as the first line of defense. • Brains at the Desk – Manage the distributed control, the big data, the (external as well as internal) customer engagement, the consumerization and the democratization of smart energy. • Thought Leaders at the Helm – Lead and retain the “smart energy” workforce into the new business era.Conference Technoark Reference: Smart Grid Technology Course Suite, 16 2013-Jan-25 UC Berkeley Extension, Michael M. Hsieh, 2012
  17. 17. Opportunities for Investments • Observability of all kinds of grid • Controllability of all kinds of grid • Communication Infrastructure for all parties • Friendly and effective Customer Engagement • Situational Intelligence and Predictive analytics • Workforce Development • Education of the general public • Smart Energy Storages, Smart Energy Systems, Smart Cities, Smart Governance • Security for Critical InfrastructureConference Technoark Reference: Smart Grid Technology Course Suite, 17 2013-Jan-25 UC Berkeley Extension, Michael M. Hsieh, 2012
  18. 18. What’s In It For Me – the Consumer? • Better Choices – Consumer and/or Prosumer • Better (Quality of) Life • Features Wanted by the People, Assets and Properties of the People, Service for the PeopleConference Technoark Reference: Smart Grid Technology Course Suite, 18 2013-Jan-25 UC Berkeley Extension, Michael M. Hsieh, 2012
  19. 19. Smart Grid: A Once In a Life Time OpportunityConference Technoark Reference: George W. Arnold, NIST, July 19, 2009 19 2013-Jan-25

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