Byod presentation

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Byod presentation

  1. 1. Implementing Change By Sharon Shaffer
  2. 2.   BYOD= Bring Your Own Device  BYOT= Bring Your Own Technology  MLD= Mobile Learning Device BYOD, BYOT AND MLDs
  3. 3.  Why BYOD?
  4. 4.   “Tablets, netbooks, laptops, multipurpose e-book readers, and smartphones have become affordable for an increasing number of families.”  “Teachers are becoming aware of applications and teaching strategies that use personal technologies to increase student engagement.”  “Districts are recognizing that they may never have adequate funding to provide a school-owned computing device to every child.” Argument For
  5. 5.   “Too many schools have taken a simple approach to student owned technologies: Banning them.”  “As the proverb says, „It‟s easier to steer a camel in the direction it is already headed.‟” Johnson, D. (2012). Power Up! On Board with BYOD. Educational Leadership 70 (2), p. 84. Argument For
  6. 6.  “If something‟s coming, we might as well invite it in and learn to manage it.” Schachter, R. (04/01/2012).Creating a robust and safe BYOD program: Plan to upgrade your district's infrastructure for increased capacity and security. District Administration (1537-5749), 48 (4), p. 28. Argument For
  7. 7.   “Proponents of „bring your own device‟ (BYOD) programs like them for a lot of reasons: budgets keep dwindling, students already bring devices to school, and technology isn‟t getting any cheaper.”  “People are saying, „It‟s happening in the real world. Let‟s mirror that in our schools‟” Anonymous. (2012). BYOD strategies.(SCHOOL C10: Strategies for K-12 Technology Leaders). Technology & learning (1053-6728), 32 (7), p. 34. Argument For
  8. 8.  “BYOD is inevitable”  Norris, C. & Soloway, E. (2011). BYOD as the catalyst to transform classroom culture: From "I teach" to "We learn". District Administration (1537-5749), 47 (9), p. 114. Argument For
  9. 9.   Christopher Harris quotes Neil Postman, “BYOD may be an economical way to adopt hardware, but there will be additional cost in network capacity, teacher training and managing lost, stolen or damaged student property.”  From Neil Postman‟s essay “Five Things We Need to Know About Technological Change. Harris, C. (2012). Going mobile: Key issues to consider for schools weighing BYOD. School Library Journal (0362-8930), 58 (1), p. 14. Argument Against
  10. 10.   “. . . Student technology use is often described as „disruptive‟”.  “Teachers may be more concerned about the „distractive‟ nature.” Johnson, D. (2012). Power Up! On Board with BYOD. Educational Leadership (0013-1784), 70 (2), p. 84. Argument Against
  11. 11.   “Consultant Gary Stager describes BYOD programs as „the worst idea of the 21st century‟, predicting that such plans will institutionalize inequities of access to technology in schools.” Johnson, D. (2012). Power Up! On Board with BYOD. Educational Leadership (0013-1784), 70 (2), p. 84 Argument Against
  12. 12.   Not all students can afford a device.  All devices aren‟t created equal.  It will cost too much to implement. Argument Against
  13. 13.  St. Marys City Schools, Ohio is in its fourth year of using MLDs in grades 3-5. They began in the fall of 2008. The first year only six teachers and 130 students used the BYOD program. This year the program has expanded across three grade levels and 500 students. Implementation
  14. 14.   This district also upgraded its wireless network to make it robust enough to manage BYOD for grades 6-12. BYOD became policy because the district has cut $3million from the budget over the last couple of years and cannot afford to keep up with the technology. Students bring laptops, tablets and iPods to use in the classroom Implementation
  15. 15.   “The first challenge demands leadership: Since teachers teach the way they were taught and since teachers learned via „I teach‟, there will be significant resistance to moving to „We learn‟.”  “The move must not be optional.” Challenges
  16. 16.  Eric Willard, chief technology officer of Community School District (CUSD) 300 in Carpentersville, Illinois says,” A few key steps make the entire process go much more smoothly.” He has dubbed these steps “Willard‟s Pyramid”. Implementation
  17. 17.  Willard‟s Pyramid
  18. 18.   The foundation of the pyramid is:  Funding and leadership. These crucial elements are the base of the pyramid, he says. “Without those in place, don‟t bother going forward.” Willard‟s Pyramid
  19. 19.   Technology planning and support. “Make sure all stakeholders are involved from the beginning. Figure out what you have and where you want to go. Build a team that supports what‟s in place today or you won‟t get the credibility to continue.” Willard‟s Pyramid
  20. 20.   Standards and infrastructure. After the tech planning, it‟s time to develop a series of standards, including hardware, software, instruction, networking, and infrastructure. “At this point you‟ll know if you need fiber between buildings, and so on. Then you can start buying hardware and software.”  Ullman, E. (2011). BYOD and Security: how do you protect students from themselves?. Technology & learning (1053-6728), 31 (8), p. 32-36 Willard‟s Pyramid
  21. 21.   “. . .teachers will need curriculum to support „We learn‟, and now there is a dearth of commercially available „We learn resources‟.” Challenges
  22. 22.   Network capacity and safety.  “„We know that districts are going to have to upgrade their infrastructures to accommodate much more traffic,‟ observes Karen Cator, director of the Office of Educational Technology at the U.S. Department of Education.” Schachter, R. (04/01/2012).Creating a robust and safe BYOD program: Plan to upgrade your district's infrastructure for increased capacity and security. District Administration (1537- 5749), 48 (4), p. 28. Challenges
  23. 23.   “Early reviews for the emerging BYOD programs have been positive.”  “If you talk to the teachers participating, the vast majority of them say the BYOD is great, reports Tim Wilson, chief technology officer, ISD 279—Osseo Area Schools, Maple Grove, Minn. Schachter, R. (04/01/2012).Creating a robust and safe BYOD program: Plan to upgrade your district's infrastructure for increased capacity and security. District Administration (1537- 5749), 48 (4), p. 28. Early Reviews

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