Interactive voting lesson    poetry ideas
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Interactive voting lesson poetry ideas

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An interactive voting lesson designed for use with Qwizdom Classroom Response Systems

An interactive voting lesson designed for use with Qwizdom Classroom Response Systems

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Interactive voting lesson poetry ideas Presentation Transcript

  • 1. POETRY IDEAS THE SUN
  • 2. The Sun It’s there all day, then it goes away. Where is it? It’s in the sky…way up high. What do we know about the sun? Things to consider to help you to write a poem about the sun. …
  • 3. The Sun What does it do? What does it remind you of? It gives us light and heat. A ball, an orange, a sphere.
  • 4. The Sun Sounds like… fun, bun. run, It looks … round, like a pound. Makes me feel…hot, quite a lot. Stuck for ideas for rhymes? A. Gore Next
  • 5. The Sun It…glistens, it gleams, it beams, it answers our dreams. It…shimmers, it shines, the light travels in lines. Some more ideas… A. Gore What poetry technique has been used here?
    • Rhyme
    • Alliteration
    • Metaphor
    • Image
    • Personification
    • Simile
    Next
  • 6. alliteration The repetition of the same consonant sounds, usually at the beginning of words, e.g. round the rugged rocks the ragged rascal ran Next
  • 7. The Sun It’s like a shining sphere… It’s like a gleaming globe… It’s like a bright golden bauble… It’s like a glistening globule… Describe it… A. Gore What poetry technique has been used here?
    • Rhyme
    • Alliteration
    • Metaphor
    • Image
    • Personification
    • Simile
    Next
  • 8. alliteration The repetition of the same consonant sounds, usually at the beginning of words, e.g. round the rugged rocks the ragged rascal ran Next
  • 9. The Sun It smiles down on us as it wraps its warmth around us. It bursts into life so very bright . It pushes back the night and gives us light. Tell me what it does… A. Gore What poetry technique has been used here?
    • Rhyme
    • Alliteration
    • Metaphor
    • Image
    • Personification
    • Simile
    Next
  • 10. personification Describing something as it it had human features and feelings. E.g. The wind whispered to them as they ran through the woods. Next
  • 11. The Sun It’s like a shining shimmering sphere, floating up high in the sky. It slides towards the horizon as it moves on it’s way through the day. First a few rays, cutting through the haze, then it bursts into view to warm me and you. Slowly blinking, then sinking, it fades, melts away. Don’t worry or fret, it’s not over yet. It returns not long after the moon and that’s fairly soon. A. Gore What poetry technique has been used here?
    • Rhyme
    • Alliteration
    • Metaphor
    • Image
    • Personification
    • Simile
    Next
  • 12. imagery Well-chosen words that help the reader to appreciate what has been seen, smelt, heard, felt or tasted e.g. the clouds were low and hairy, the roar of trees, a scent of ripeness from over a wall. Next
  • 13. Now to write your own poems: Kennings
    • A kenning is a much-compressed form of metaphor, originally used in Anglo-Saxon and Norse poetry. In a kenning, an object is described in a two-word phrase, such as 'whale-road' for 'sea'. Some kennings can be more obscure than others, and then grow close to being a riddle. Judith Nicholls' 'Bluebottle' uses kennings as part of a larger poem, that is itself a riddle.
    Next
  • 14. Bluebottle
    • Who dips, dives
    • Swoops out of space,
    • A buzz in his wings
    • And sky on his face
    • Now caught in the light,
    • Now gone without trace,
    • A sliver of glass,
    • Never still in one place?
    • Who’s elusive as a pickpocket,
    • Lord of the flies;
    • Who moves like a rocket,
    • Bound for the skies?
    • Who’s catapult, aeroplane,
    • Always full throttle?
    • Sky-diver, Jumping Jack,
    • Comet, bluebottle!
    • Copyright
    • from Storm's Eye (Oxford University Press, 1992), copyright © Judith Nicholls 1992, used by permission of the author
    Last Slide