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Figures of Speech<br />By: John Lennon<br />EDU 290<br />Tuesday & Thursday: 8am<br />
Metaphor<br />An Implicit juxtaposition of two unlike objects (Meyer 660)<br />Much like a simile, but…<br />Comparison is...
Example of Metaphor<br />“Presentiment- is that long shadow- on the lawn” by Emily Dickinson<br />“Presentiment- is that l...
Simile<br />“Similes are an ‘explicit’ variation of a metaphor and usually contain one grammatical marker” (Garman-Gard 29...
Example of Simile<br />“You Fit Into Me” by Margret Atwood<br />“You Fit into me/ like a hook into an eye/ a fish hook/ an...
Synecdoche <br />“a figure of speech in which part of something is used to signify the whole” (Meyer 664)<br />A small fac...
Example of Synecdoche<br />“Schizophrenia” by Jim Stevens<br />“The house came to miss the shouting voices,/ the threats, ...
Metonymy <br />Literary technique in which something related to the subject is used interchangeably for the subject (Meyer...
Example of Metonymy<br />“The hand that signed the paper” by Dylan Thomas<br />“A goose’s quill has put an end to murder/ ...
Idiom<br />“A construction or string of words whose intended meaning in context is different from the literal meaning of t...
Common Idioms<br />Kick the bucket<br />Hit the hay<br />Breaking the ice<br />Kick out the jams<br />Hold you horses<br />
Symbolism<br />“A symbol is… an object, a person, a place, an event, or an action [that] can suggest more than its literal...
Example of symbolism<br />“A Poison Tree” by William Blake<br />“And it grow both day and night,/ till it bore an apple br...
The End<br />
Works Cited<br />Dobrovol'skij, Dmitrij, and Elisabeth Piirainen. Figurative 	Language: Cross-cultural and Cross-linguisti...
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Figures of speech

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Figures of speech

  1. 1. Figures of Speech<br />By: John Lennon<br />EDU 290<br />Tuesday & Thursday: 8am<br />
  2. 2. Metaphor<br />An Implicit juxtaposition of two unlike objects (Meyer 660)<br />Much like a simile, but…<br />Comparison is done without use of grammatical markers<br />Creates a direct comparrison<br />
  3. 3. Example of Metaphor<br />“Presentiment- is that long shadow- on the lawn” by Emily Dickinson<br />“Presentiment- is that long shadow- on the lawn-/ indicative that Suns go down” (Meyer 661)<br />Compares the foreboding sense of things to come to shadows.<br />
  4. 4. Simile<br />“Similes are an ‘explicit’ variation of a metaphor and usually contain one grammatical marker” (Garman-Gard 29)<br />Grammatical Markers include…<br />Like<br />AS<br />As if<br />
  5. 5. Example of Simile<br />“You Fit Into Me” by Margret Atwood<br />“You Fit into me/ like a hook into an eye/ a fish hook/ an open eye” (Meyer 660)<br />The simile here is “you fit into me like a hook into an eye”<br />
  6. 6. Synecdoche <br />“a figure of speech in which part of something is used to signify the whole” (Meyer 664)<br />A small facet of a person, place, or object is used to represent the thing which it is part of.<br />
  7. 7. Example of Synecdoche<br />“Schizophrenia” by Jim Stevens<br />“The house came to miss the shouting voices,/ the threats, the half apologies...” (Meyer 673)<br />The voices represent people in conflict<br />
  8. 8. Metonymy <br />Literary technique in which something related to the subject is used interchangeably for the subject (Meyer 664)<br />
  9. 9. Example of Metonymy<br />“The hand that signed the paper” by Dylan Thomas<br />“A goose’s quill has put an end to murder/ that put an to talk” (Meyer 664)<br />The goose’s quill represents the power that ruler’s have.<br />
  10. 10. Idiom<br />“A construction or string of words whose intended meaning in context is different from the literal meaning of the construction.” (Garman-Gard 97)<br />
  11. 11. Common Idioms<br />Kick the bucket<br />Hit the hay<br />Breaking the ice<br />Kick out the jams<br />Hold you horses<br />
  12. 12. Symbolism<br />“A symbol is… an object, a person, a place, an event, or an action [that] can suggest more than its literal meaning.” (Meyer 680)<br />Usually represent a larger theme in the piece<br />
  13. 13. Example of symbolism<br />“A Poison Tree” by William Blake<br />“And it grow both day and night,/ till it bore an apple bright an apple bright.” (Lynch 96)<br />It refers to the tree in the poem<br />The tree represents anger<br />The apple is the product of anger<br />
  14. 14. The End<br />
  15. 15. Works Cited<br />Dobrovol'skij, Dmitrij, and Elisabeth Piirainen. Figurative Language: Cross-cultural and Cross-linguistic Perspectives. Vol. 13. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2005. Print.<br />Gorman-Gard, Kathleen A. Figurative Language: a Comprehensive Program. Eau Claire, WI: Thinking Publications, 1992. Print.<br />Meyer, Michael. The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. Ninth ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2012. Print.<br />Stillinger, Jack, and Deidre Lynch. The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Romantic Period. Eighth ed. Vol. D. New York, NY: Norton, 2006. Print.<br />Images from Clip Art<br />

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