Successfully reported this slideshow.
Poems for Shared, Choral,Paired, and Echo ReadingCompiled byMary Ann Reilly (2012)Blueprints for Learning, Inc.36 Laurel P...
City    -   Langston Hughes!!In the morning the citySpreads its wingsMaking a songIn stone that sings.In the evening the c...
Mi casa                                               My House        $   Francisco X. Alarcón                            ...
Being a Tree!        $   Opal Palmer AdisaOne timeI stood on the arm of the sofabalancing on one legmy arms spread widelik...
In the Inner City        $   Lucille Cliftonin the inner cityorlike we call ithomewe think a lot about uptownand the silen...
!Lluvia                                              Rain         $   Alma Flor Ada                                       ...
What I Love About Summer       $   Douglas FlorianMorning gloriesCampfire storiesPicking cherriesAnd blueberriesRiding bik...
Some Summers       $   Douglas FlorianSome summers blaze.Some summers haze.Some summers simmer.Some summers shimmer.Some s...
Dog Day       $   Douglas FlorianIt’s hot and it’s hazy.My body feels lazy.My clothing is clinging.No songbird is singing....
Storm       $   Ann TurnerMeadow flowers rub the skylike kittens nuzzlinga mother’s belly;gold, white, orangestretch and s...
Storm        $   Elizabeth SwadosBoom! Thunder!Boom! Thunder!First the lightning,        Crack!               It’s frighte...
Michael Is Afraid of Storms!        - Gwendolyn BrooksLightning is angry in the night.Thunder spanks our house.Rain is hat...
Lemonade Stand       $   Myra Cohn LivingstonEvery summerunder the shadewe fix up a standto sell lemonade.A stack of cups,...
Sun Is Laughing       $   Grace NicholsThis morning she got upon the happy side of bed,pulled backthe gray sky-curtainsand...
Sun       $   Valerie WorthThe sunIs a leaping fireToo hotTo go near.But it will stillLie downIn warm yellow squaresOn the...
Jitomates Risueños                                Laughing Tomatoes        $   Francisco X. Alarcón                       ...
If You Catch a Firefly       $   Lilian MooreIf you catch a firefly       and keep it in a jarYou may find that       you ...
Castanet Clicks       $   Pat MoraUno, dosone, twobaskets blue.Tres, cuatrothree, fourone bell more.Cinco, seisfive, sixca...
Ode to Buena                                   Oda a la EscuelaVista Bilingual School                         Bilingüe de ...
Oda a mis zapatos                  Ode to My Shoes       $   Francisco X.                    $   Francisco X. Alarcón     ...
Summer!        - Elizabeth SwadosTsssSummer sounds,TsssConcrete and heatSneakered feet on tar,Stepping in a melted candy b...
Arrivals       $   Ann TurnerThe swallows lighton sloping wires,then tails flickingthey slice the cloudsmore delicate than...
On the Corner       $   Carole Boston WeatherfordThe shoeshine man pops a clothacross black wing tips, his facereflected i...
Sidewalk Chalk       $   Carole Boston WeatherfordBig and bold now, write your name.Draw an arrow, then take aimat a puffy...
Ducha diaria                                  Ducha diaria        $   Francisco X. Alarcón                      $     Fran...
Árboles!                                          Trees       - Alma Flor Ada                                    - Alma Fl...
Summer Shower       $   David McCordWindow window window pane:Let it let it let it rainDrop by drop by drop by drop.Run yo...
City Noise!       $   Karla KuskinSo what did you see?An old tin can,It was sitting in a gutterI took it in my hand.I held...
Lou’s Barbershop       $   Carole Boston WeatherfordInside the storefront, snake plants thrive,gossip grows wild, and men ...
Sol matutino        $   Francisco X. Alarcóncalentandomi camaen la mañanael solme llamapor la ventana“despiertalevántateve...
Jackie Robinson        $   Lucille Cliftonran against wallswithout breaking;in night gameswas not foulbut, brave as a hito...
On a Summer Day        $    Isabel Joshlin GlaserNoon’s lion-faced sunshakes outits orange mane.Its tonguescorchesleaves.E...
Summer Moon        $   Ann TurnerIt doesn’t stop,the hurrying, growing,even after the sun rolls upthe dayand voles sleep, ...
Manhattan Lullaby        $   Norma FarberLulled by rumble, babble, beep,let these little children sleep;let these city gir...
When a City Leans Against the Sky!!        $   Allan A. DeFinaWhen a cityleans against the sky,buildings sneeze andpress f...
To Walk in Warm Rain        $   David McCordTo walk in warm rain       And get wetter and wetter!To do it again—To walk in...
Where I Live        $   Carole Boston WeatherfordWhere I livethere are no treesto climb, but I stillreach for the stars.My...
Works Cited!Ada, A.F. (1997). Gathering the Sun: An Alphabet in Spanish and English. Illustrated by Simón         Silva. N...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Poems for shared, choral, paired, and echo reading

56,480 views

Published on

A collection of global, multicultural poetry for K-3 children to be used for shared, choral, echo, and paired reading.

  • I'm eager to share these poems with students and teachers in my new role as Literacy Specialist for an inner city school in Austin, Texas. Thanks especially for the fun Spanish translations; they're golden!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Poems for shared, choral, paired, and echo reading

  1. 1. Poems for Shared, Choral,Paired, and Echo ReadingCompiled byMary Ann Reilly (2012)Blueprints for Learning, Inc.36 Laurel PlaceRingwood, NJ 07456blueprints1@optonline.net973-617-7388
  2. 2. City - Langston Hughes!!In the morning the citySpreads its wingsMaking a songIn stone that sings.In the evening the cityGoes to bedHanging lightsAbout its head.From: Yolen, J. (Ed.) (1996). Skyscrape/City Scape: Poems of City Life. Illustrated by KenCondon. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.! 2!
  3. 3. Mi casa My House $ Francisco X. Alarcón $ Francisco X. Alarcónes ruidosa is loudy alegre como and cheerfulmi familia like my familydía y noche day and nightno déjà keeps onde rechinar squeakingcomo just likelos niños the kids fromdel vecindario the neighborhoodquisiera would ratheren la calle be playingtambién jugar. on the street !from: Alarcón, F.X. (2005). Angels Ride Bikes: Los Angeles Andan en Bicicleta. Illustrated byMaya Christina Gonzalez. San Francisco, CA: Children’s Books Press.! 3!
  4. 4. Being a Tree! $ Opal Palmer AdisaOne timeI stood on the arm of the sofabalancing on one legmy arms spread widelike branches.I was a gigantic treein the deep green forest.Many birds sat on my brancheschirping their happy songs.Small animals nestled by my trunkprancing and playing, being free.And just as a blue jaywas about to land on my branchMom shouted, “Be careful!”The blue jay flew away.I fell, and my tree toppled over.From: Agard, John & Nichols, Grace (Eds.). (1994). A Caribbean Dozen: Poems from CaribbeanPoets. Illustrated by Cathie Felstead. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press.!! 4!
  5. 5. In the Inner City $ Lucille Cliftonin the inner cityorlike we call ithomewe think a lot about uptownand the silent nightsand the houses straight asdead menand the pastel lightsand we hang on to our no placehappy to be aliveand in the inner cityorlike we call ithome.From: Yolen, J. (Ed.) (1996). Skyscrape/City Scape: Poems of City Life. Illustrated by KenCondon. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.! 5!
  6. 6. !Lluvia Rain $ Alma Flor Ada $ Alma Flor AdaPlin, plin, plin, Plink, plink, plink,la lluvia suena the rain sounds likecomo violín. A violin.Borrombombón, Booroomboomboom,resuena el trueno the thunder iscomo violín. a deep trombone.! !Tomates Tomatoes $ Alma Flor Ada $ Alma Flor AdaTomate fresco Fresh tomatoen la ensalada, in a salad,en la salsa, in the salsa,en la enchilada. in enchiladas.Tomate rojo Red tomatoen la cocina, in the kitchen,en los taquitos in the little tacosde mi madrina. my godmother loves to make. !From Ada, A.F. (1997). Gathering the Sun: An Alphabet in Spanish and English. Illustrated bySimón Silva. NY: HarperChildren’s.! 6!
  7. 7. What I Love About Summer $ Douglas FlorianMorning gloriesCampfire storiesPicking cherriesAnd blueberriesRiding bikesMountain hikesBird callsCurve ballsShort sleevesGreen leavesSwimming holesFishing polesNature walksCorn stalksSkipping stonesIce cream conesDouble playsAnd barefoot days.From: Florian, D. (2002). Summersaults. NY: Greenwillow.! 7!
  8. 8. Some Summers $ Douglas FlorianSome summers blaze.Some summers haze.Some summers simmer.Some summers shimmer.Some summers sizzle.Some summers fizzle.Some summers flameBo two summersAre the same.!!From: Florian, D. (2002). Summersaults. NY: Greenwillow.! 8!
  9. 9. Dog Day $ Douglas FlorianIt’s hot and it’s hazy.My body feels lazy.My clothing is clinging.No songbird is singing.The temperature’s torrid.My temperament’s horrid.Has anyone thrownThis dog day a bone?From: Florian, D. (2002). Summersaults. NY: Greenwillow.! 9!
  10. 10. Storm $ Ann TurnerMeadow flowers rub the skylike kittens nuzzlinga mother’s belly;gold, white, orangestretch and search until skylicks them flat againwith its fierce wettongue.From: Turner, A. (1994). A Moon for Seasons. Illustrated by Robert Noreika. NY: Macmillan.! 10!
  11. 11. Storm $ Elizabeth SwadosBoom! Thunder!Boom! Thunder!First the lightning, Crack! It’s frightening.Then the BOOM,Thunder,Outside my room BOOM, the thunderAnd the rain pours,Like nails on the roofAnd POOF!Out goes the lights.What a night BOOM, Thunder!Night of fright,Night of wonder,BOOM, Thunder!From: Swados, E. (2002). Hey You! C’mere: A Poetry Slam. Illustrated by Joe Cepeda. NY:Arthur Levine.! 11!
  12. 12. Michael Is Afraid of Storms! - Gwendolyn BrooksLightning is angry in the night.Thunder spanks our house.Rain is hating our old elm—It punishes the boughs.Now, I am next to nine years old,And crying’s not for me.But if I touch my mother’s hands.Perhaps no one will see.And if I keep herself in sight —Follow her busy dress—No one will notice my wild eye.No one will laugh, I guess.from: Hall, D. (Ed.)(2001). The Oxford Illustrated Book of American Children’s Poems. NewYork: Oxford University Press.! 12!
  13. 13. Lemonade Stand $ Myra Cohn LivingstonEvery summerunder the shadewe fix up a standto sell lemonade.A stack of cups,a pitcher if ice,a shirtboard signto tell the price.A dime for the big.A nickel for the small.The nickel cup’s short.The dime cup’s tall.Plenty of sugarto make it sweet,and sometimes cookiesfor us to eat.But when the sunmoves into the shadeit gets too hotto sell lemonade.Nobody stopsso we put things awayand drink what’s leftand start to play.From: Cullinan, B.E. (Ed.). (1996). A Jar of Tiny Stars: Poems by NCTE Award-Winning Poets.Urbana, IL: NCTE.! 13!
  14. 14. Sun Is Laughing $ Grace NicholsThis morning she got upon the happy side of bed,pulled backthe gray sky-curtainsand poked her headthrough the blue windowof heaven,her yellow laughterspilling over,falling broad across the grass,brightening the washing on the line,giving more shineto the back of a ladybugand buttering up all the world.From: Agard, John & Nichols, Grace (Eds.). (1994). A Caribbean Dozen: Poems from CaribbeanPoets. Illustrated by Cathie Felstead. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press.! 14!
  15. 15. Sun $ Valerie WorthThe sunIs a leaping fireToo hotTo go near.But it will stillLie downIn warm yellow squaresOn the floorLike a flatQuilt, whereThe cat can curlAnd purr.From: Hopkins, L.B. (Ed). (1994). Weather: Poems for All Seasons. Illustrated by Melanie Hall.NY: HarperTrophy.! 15!
  16. 16. Jitomates Risueños Laughing Tomatoes $ Francisco X. Alarcón $ Francisco X. Alarcónen el jardin in our backyardplantamos we plantjitomates tomatoeslos vegetales the happiestmás felices of allde todos vegetablesalegres with joyse redondean they grow roundde sabor with flavorrisueños laughingse ponen they changecolorados to redconvirtiendo turningsus arbustos their wire-framedalambrados bushesen árboles intode Navidad Christmas treesen primavera in springfrom: Hall, D. (Ed.). (2001). The Oxford Illustrated Book of American Children’s Poems. NewYork: Oxford University Press.! 16!
  17. 17. If You Catch a Firefly $ Lilian MooreIf you catch a firefly and keep it in a jarYou may find that you have lostA tiny star.If you let it go then, back into the night,You may see it once againStar bright.From: Cullinan, B.E. (Ed.). (1996). A Jar of Tiny Stars: Poems by NCTE Award-Winning Poets.Urbana, IL: NCTE.! 17!
  18. 18. Castanet Clicks $ Pat MoraUno, dosone, twobaskets blue.Tres, cuatrothree, fourone bell more.Cinco, seisfive, sixcastanet clicks.Siete, ochoseven, eightcopper plates.Nueve, dieznine, tencount again.from: Hall, D. (Ed.). (2001). The Oxford Illustrated Book of American Children’s Poems. NewYork: Oxford University Press.! 18!
  19. 19. Ode to Buena Oda a la EscuelaVista Bilingual School Bilingüe de Buena Vista - Francisco X. Alarcón $ Francisco X. Alarcón aqui el españolhere Spanish va a la escuelagoes to school con el ingléswith English uno-dos-tresuno-dos-tres es tan fácil comois as easy as one-two-threeone-two-three aqui niños de todashere children las razas escribenof all races write bellos poemasbeautiful poems tanto en inglésin English como en españoland Spanish hasta en espiraleven in spirals y siguiendoand following la clave delthe beat of teacher maestro FelipeFelipes clave aqui los niñoshere children aprenden a cantarlearn to sing con el corazónwith their heartsfrom: Alarcón, F.X. (2005). Iguanas in the Snow and Other Winter Poems/Iguanas en la nieve:y otros poemas de invierno. Illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez. San Francisco, CA:Children’s Book Press.! 19!
  20. 20. Oda a mis zapatos Ode to My Shoes $ Francisco X. $ Francisco X. Alarcón Alarcónmis zapatos my shoesdescansan resttoda la noche all nightbajo mi cama under my bedcansados tiredse estiran they stretchse aflojan and loosenlas cintas their lacesmuy anchose wide opense duermen they fall asleepy sueñan and dreamcon andar of walkingrecorren they revisitlos lugares the placesadonde fueron they went toen el día during the dayy amanecen and wake upcontentos cheerfulrelajados relaxedsuavecitos so softfrom: Alarcón, F.X. (2005). From the Bellybutton of the Moon and Other Summer Poems/DelOmbligo de la Luna: Y Otros Poemas de Verano. Illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez. SanFrancisco, CA: Children’s Book Press.! 20!
  21. 21. Summer! - Elizabeth SwadosTsssSummer sounds,TsssConcrete and heatSneakered feet on tar,Stepping in a melted candy bar,SquishCrunch, crunchGravel on the street,WhooshHydrant waterfall,ZzzztThe sun’s an orange basketball,Bonk bonkSummer sounds,And thenSummer’s gone.From: Swados, E. (2002). Hey You! C’mere: A Poetry Slam. Illustrated by Joe Cepeda. NY:Arthur Levine.! 21!
  22. 22. Arrivals $ Ann TurnerThe swallows lighton sloping wires,then tails flickingthey slice the cloudsmore delicate than surgeons,let summer in.From: Turner, A. (1994). A Moon for Seasons. Illustrated by Robert Noreika. NY: Macmillan.! 22!
  23. 23. On the Corner $ Carole Boston WeatherfordThe shoeshine man pops a clothacross black wing tips, his facereflected in polished leather.As little girls jump double Dutch,beaded braids swirl and click.Brothers with time on their handscroon three-part harmony,setting pace for foot trafficup and down the sidewalk.A boy with a boom box headsfor the blacktop to shoot hoops.At the bus stop, a ladytoting a shopping bag tells me,“Be careful crossing the street, honey.”From Weatherford, C.B. (2006). Sidewalk chalk: Poems of the City. Illustrated by DimitreaTokunbo. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.! 23!
  24. 24. Sidewalk Chalk $ Carole Boston WeatherfordBig and bold now, write your name.Draw an arrow, then take aimat a puffy heart: “Kim loves Kyle.”Doodling’s sure to bring a smile.How about some tic-tac-toe?You be X; I’ll be O.Draw a yellow happy faceor the finish line for a relay race,a wide, wide river to leap across,a little circle for beanbag toss,a bigger circle to play dodge ball.Trace a shadow ten feet tall.Make a line for tug-of-warand signs that no one dare ignore.Create a sun with a beaming grin,a great white shark with a giant fin.Draw a square to make home plate,a swirly figure eight to skate.Big and bold now, write your name.Keep score for sidewalk games.From Weatherford, C.B. (2006). Sidewalk chalk: Poems of the City. Illustrated by DimitreaTokunbo. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.! 24!
  25. 25. Ducha diaria Ducha diaria $ Francisco X. Alarcón $ Francisco X. Alarcón !en el verano duringllueve summera cántaros it pourstodos los dias every daya las cinco at fiveen punto on the dottoda le gente everybodybusca resguardo takes coverpero pronto but soonse despeja it clears upy de nuevo and the sunsale el sol comes backlas calles streetslas aceras sidewalksbrillan de shine so neattan limpias and cleandespués afterde tomar takingsu docha their dailydiaria showerfrom: Alarcón, F.X. (2005). From the Bellybutton of the Moon and Other Summer Poems/DelOmbligo de la Luna: Y Otros Poemas de Verano. Illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez. SanFrancisco, CA: Children’s Book Press.! 25!
  26. 26. Árboles! Trees - Alma Flor Ada - Alma Flor Ada Companions of my childhood,Compañeros de mi infancia, handsome green giants.hermosos gigantes verdes. Plums, pears, pistachios.Ciruelos, peral, pistachos, peaches and apricots,durazneros, chabacanos, almonds, oranges, kiwis,almendros, naranjos, kiwi, cherries, walnuts, and apples.cerezos, nogal, manzanos. Trees that bear the fruitsÁrboles que dan la fruta that my parents harvest.que mis padres van pizcando. !From Ada, A.F. (1997). Gathering the Sun: An Alphabet in Spanish and English. Illustrated bySimón Silva. NY: HarperChildren’s.! 26!
  27. 27. Summer Shower $ David McCordWindow window window pane:Let it let it let it rainDrop by drop by drop by drop.Run your rivers from the topZigzaggy down, like slow wet forksOf lightning, so the slippery corksOf bubbles float and overtakeEach other till three bubbles makeA kind of boat too far to fitThe river. That’s the end of it. Straight down it slides and with a splashIs lost against the window sash.Window window window pane:Let it let it let it rain!!!!From: Kennedy, X.J. and Kennedy, Dorothy M. (Eds.). (2002). Talking like the Rain: A Read-to-me Book of Poems. Illustrated by Jane Dyer. NY: Little, Brown and Company.! 27!
  28. 28. City Noise! $ Karla KuskinSo what did you see?An old tin can,It was sitting in a gutterI took it in my hand.I held it very carefully against my earAnd listened, listened, listened.So what did you hear?SquallingCallingCrashingRushingHonkingJokingBelchingSmokingBuyingSellingLaughingYellingRunningWheelingRoaringSquealingCars and garbageReds and greensGirls and womenMenMachinesGettingGivingDogs and boysLiving Living LivingCity noise.From Kuskin, K. (1994). City Noise. Illustrated by Renee Flower. NY: HarperCollins.! 28!
  29. 29. Lou’s Barbershop $ Carole Boston WeatherfordInside the storefront, snake plants thrive,gossip grows wild, and men trade jibes.Between gulps of Coke, they shoot the breezeand tell half-truths no one believes.News of comings and goings spreadswhile Lou minds his business and just cuts heads.Two old men who must live in the shopplay a game of spades that never stops.Lou wipes the seat and I climb right in.Then he raises the chair and gives it a spin.I sit very still and hairs fall to the capeas clippers buzz and a style takes shape.Dusted with talc, splashed with cologne,I feel as if I’m a prince on a throne.From Weatherford, C.B. (2006). Sidewalk Chalk: Poems of the City. Illustrated by DimitreaTokunbo. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.! 29!
  30. 30. Sol matutino $ Francisco X. Alarcóncalentandomi camaen la mañanael solme llamapor la ventana“despiertalevántateven afuera”Morning Sun $ Francisco X. Alarcónwarming upmy bedin the morningthe Suncalls methrough the window“wake upget upcome on out”from: Hall, D. (Ed.). (2001). The Oxford Illustrated Book of American Children’s Poems. NewYork: Oxford University Press.! 30!
  31. 31. Jackie Robinson $ Lucille Cliftonran against wallswithout breaking;in night gameswas not foulbut, brave as a hitover whitestone fences,entering the conquering dark.From: Morrison, L. (Compiler). (1992). At the Crack of the Bat: Baseball Poems. Illustrated bySteve Cieskawski. New York: Hyperion.José Canseco (jump rope rhyme)José Canseco is a very nice man.He hits all the home runs that he can.How many homers did he hit today?Let’s count them up in a very new way.One-a, two-a, three-aFrom: Morrison, L. (Compiler). (1992). At the Crack of the Bat: Baseball Poems. Illustrated bySteve Cieskawski. New York: Hyperion.! 31!
  32. 32. On a Summer Day $ Isabel Joshlin GlaserNoon’s lion-faced sunshakes outits orange mane.Its tonguescorchesleaves.Ever the bugswantrain.From: Hopkins, L.B. (Ed). (1994). Weather: Poems for All Seasons. Illustrated by Melanie Hall.NY: HarperTrophy.! 32!
  33. 33. Summer Moon $ Ann TurnerIt doesn’t stop,the hurrying, growing,even after the sun rolls upthe dayand voles sleep, swallows rest,the moon pours out its lighton crickets, owl, and skunkwhile plants stretch upto that other sun.From: Turner, A. (1994). A Moon for Seasons. Illustrated by Robert Noreika. NY: Macmillan.! 33!
  34. 34. Manhattan Lullaby $ Norma FarberLulled by rumble, babble, beep,let these little children sleep;let these city girls and boysdream a music in the noise,hear a tune their city plucksup from buses, up from trucksup from engines wailing fire!up ten stories high, and higher,up from hammers, rivets, drills,up tall buildings, over sills,up where city children sleep,lulled by rumble, babble, beep.From: Yolen, J. (Ed.). (1996). Skyscrape/City Scape: Poems of City Life. Illustrated by KenCondon. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.! 34!
  35. 35. When a City Leans Against the Sky!! $ Allan A. DeFinaWhen a cityleans against the sky,buildings sneeze andpress for elbowroomwith the clouds.The sky turns blueand bursts into sunor moon or stars.From: DeFina, A.A. (1997). When a City Leans Against the Sky. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.Stories $ Allan A. DeFinaOnly a cityhas more storiesbehind each windowedshelfthan a librarycan holdor a storytellertell.From: DeFina, A.A. (1997). When a City Leans Against the Sky. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.! 35!
  36. 36. To Walk in Warm Rain $ David McCordTo walk in warm rain And get wetter and wetter!To do it again—To walk in warm rain Till you drip like a drain.To walk in warm rain And get wetter and wetter.From: Hopkins, L.B. (Ed). (1994). Weather: Poems for All Seasons. Illustrated by Melanie Hall.NY: HarperTrophy.! 36!
  37. 37. Where I Live $ Carole Boston WeatherfordWhere I livethere are no treesto climb, but I stillreach for the stars.My dreams take rootin concrete,and my brancheslift the sky.From Weatherford, C.B. (2006). Sidewalk chalk: Poems of the City. Illustrated by DimitreaTokunbo. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.! 37!
  38. 38. Works Cited!Ada, A.F. (1997). Gathering the Sun: An Alphabet in Spanish and English. Illustrated by Simón Silva. NY: HarperChildren’s.Agard, John & Nichols, Grace (Eds.). (1994). A Caribbean Dozen: Poems from Caribbean Poets. Illustrated by Cathie Felstead. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press.Alarcón, F.X. (2005). From the Bellybutton of the Moon and Other Summer Poems/Del Ombligo de la Luna: Y Otros Poemas de Verano. Illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez. San Francisco, CA: Children’s Book Press.Alarcón, F.X. (2005). Angels Ride Bikes: Los Angeles Andan en Bicicleta. Illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez. San Francisco, CA: Children’s Books Press.Alarcón, F.X. (2005). Iguanas in the Snow and Other Winter Poems/Iguanas en la nieve: y otros poemas de invierno. Illustrated by Maya Christina Gonzalez. San Francisco, CA: Children’s Book Press.Cullinan, B.E. (Ed.). (1996). A Jar of Tiny Stars: Poems by NCTE Award-Winning Poets. Urbana, IL: NCTE.DeFina, A.A. (1997). When a City Leans Against the Sky. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.Florian, D. (2002). Summersaults. NY: Greenwillow.Hall, D. (Ed.). (2001). The Oxford Illustrated Book of American Children’s Poems. New York: Oxford University Press.Hopkins, L.B. (Ed). (1994). Weather: Poems for All Seasons. Illustrated by Melanie Hall. NY: HarperTrophy.Kennedy, X.J. and Kennedy, Dorothy M. (Eds.). (2002). Talking like the Rain: A Read-to-me Book of Poems. Illustrated by Jane Dyer. NY: Little, Brown and Company.Kuskin, K. (1994). City Noise. Illustrated by Renee Flower. NY: HarperCollins.Morrison, L. (Compiler). (1992). At the Crack of the Bat: Baseball Poems. Illustrated by Steve Cieskawski. New York: Hyperion.Swados, E. (2002). Hey You! C’mere: A Poetry Slam. Illustrated by Joe Cepeda. NY: Arthur Levine.Turner, A. (1994). A Moon for Seasons. Illustrated by Robert Noreika. NY: Macmillan.Weatherford, C.B. (2006). Sidewalk chalk: Poems of the City. Illustrated by Dimitrea Tokunbo. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.Yolen, J. (Ed.) (1996). Skyscrape/City Scape: Poems of City Life. Illustrated by Ken Condon. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong.!! 38!

×