Rawsthorne | Who is your PO

  • 894 views
Uploaded on

http://agiledays.ru

http://agiledays.ru

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
894
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
28
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Dan Rawsthorne Certified Scrum Trainer Senior Coach Danube Technologies, Inc. dan@danube.com Agile Days ‘09, Moscow December 9, 2009 Product Owner The Secret of Success © 2009 Topics to Cover How Scrum Works Who/What is the Product Owner (PO)? Responsibilities of the PO Summary Discussion © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 2 Danube Webinar 1
  • 2. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Why the Product Owner is Important According to the Standish Group, the following Table represents the primary success/failure criteria for Software Projects SUCCESS CRITERIA POINTS 1. User Involvement 19 2. Executive Management Support 16 3. Clear Statement of Requirements 15 4. Proper Planning 11 5. Realistic Expectations 10 6. Smaller Project Milestones 9 7. Competent Staff 8 8. Ownership 6 9. Clear Vision & Objectives 3 10. Hard-Working, Focused Staff 3 TOTAL 100 © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 3 How Scrum Works © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 4 Danube Webinar 2
  • 3. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Mechanics of Scrum: Flow Each Sprint Reports/ Daily Metrics/ Standup Impediments Sprint/ Iteration Sprint Planning Increment Sprint of Work Backlog Backlog Sprint Review Retrospective Results © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 5 Why Scrum Succeeds Empirical (agile) Process – Detailed up-front planning and defined processes are replaced by adaptive inspect and adapt cycles (product and process) Changeable Code – we know how to write code we’re not afraid to change Strict Accountability Model – one person on each Team (the PO) is accountable for the Team’s product Self-Organization – team is self-managing and organizes itself around goals given constraints © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 6 Danube Webinar 3
  • 4. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Who/What is the Product Owner? © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 7 Straight to the Source – Ken Schwaber The Product Owner is the leader of the Scrum Team “The [Product Owner] is responsible for what the scrum team builds and for optimizing the value of it.” (The Enterprise and Scrum, 2008, pg 114) “[The Product Owner] is the person who is officially responsible for the project… everyone in the organization has to respect his or her decisions. No one is allowed to tell the Scrum Teams to work from a different set of priorities, and Scrum Teams aren’t allowed to listen to anyone who says otherwise.” (Agile Software Development with Scrum, Schwaber and Beedle, 2002, pg 34) [ed: emphasis mine] The Product Owner is the “single, wringable, neck” (The Enterprise and Scrum, 2008, pg 6) There are two additional caveats The Product Owner IS a member of the Scrum Team The Product Owner IS NOT the ScrumMaster But I’ll tell you a story about this one later… This is it. This is all. Everything else is just noise… © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 8 Danube Webinar 4
  • 5. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 The Basic Scrum Engine (Scrum Team) Product Owner is the Key As a Person Single-Wringable Neck Stakeholders Decides on Releasability Business As a Role Owner Stakeholder Management Vision, Goals, and Features SME Release Planning SME Scrum Product Master Owner Drives the Team Understands ROI Prioritizes Stories Acts as SME, or brings SME SME them in Drive the Team © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 9 Getting Work Done (the RASCI model) R esponsible – the Team members are Responsible for the work the Team committed to A ccountable – the Product Owner is the only Team member Accountable to the Business for the work the Team has committed to S upportive – The ScrumMaster is Supportive of the Team by facilitating its self-organization, coaching in scrum, removing impediments, and so on… C onsulted – external Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) are Consulted by Team members if necessary. No one outside the team is either Responsible or Accountable for work the Team has committed to I nformed – all external Stakeholders are kept Informed of what the Team has committed to, and the progress the team is making © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 10 Danube Webinar 5
  • 6. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Product Owner vs ScrumMaster The PO is "The person who is responsible for what the scrum team builds and for optimizing the value of it." (The Enterprise and Scrum, pg 114) “The ScrumMaster is responsible for the Scrum process, its correct implementation, and the maximization of its benefits” (Agile Project Management with Scrum, pg 142) “In particular, the ScrumMaster is responsible for teaching the PO how to most effectively manage the work of the Scrum team … and meet their objectives through scrum." (The Enterprise and Scrum, pg 78) The PO and SM go together “like peas and carrots” (Forrest Gump) “like a horse and carriage” (Frank Sinatra) “like milk and cookies” (Santa Claus) © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 11 Organizational Examples There are many Product Owners here, if the organization is managing itself using scrum These people will have to learn the scrum way of doing things The people don’t change, the way they work changes… “Product H-12” These people Office Management SMEs Are POs. It’s not Staff Team A choice – it’s a Product Manager: Hugh definition “Project Gold” “Project Silver” “Project Fury” Management Development Management Team Team Team Project Manager: Gerry Project Manager : Susan Project Manager: Fiona Team Lead: Stan “Pirates” “Warriors” “Lions” “Tigers” “Bears” DevTeam DevTeam DevTeam DevTeam DevTeam Team Lead: Pete Team Lead: Wendi Team Lead: Lars Team Lead: Tanvi Team Lead: Bhanu © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 12 Danube Webinar 6
  • 7. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Managing with Scrum Organizational Teams Project Management Team “Project Gold” Project Gold Dev Teams Management PO Team Team Scrum Teams (potentially) Project Manager: Gerry Project Management Team “Pirates” “Warriors” Dev Teams DevTeam DevTeam Team Lead: Pete Team Lead: Wendi Product Owner Teams (virtual) “Product H-12” Office Management Product H-12 Communicate SMEs PO Team Staff Team Cooperate Product Manager: Hugh Coordinate “Project Gold” “Project Silver” “Project Fury” Management Development Management Team Team Team Project Manager: Gerry Project Manager : Susan Project Manager: Fiona Team Lead: Stan © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 13 Managing the Backlog One thing these PO Teams could do is manage a joint backlog The following is a simple example of what this could look like Mgmt Unallocated “Project Fury” Backlog Backlog Management Team Project Manager: Fiona Team Team Team “Tigers” Backlog “Bears” Backlog “Lions” Backlog DevTeam DevTeam DevTeam Team Lead: Tanvi Team Lead: Bhanu Team Lead: Lars The Team’s Backlog may only consist of the Sprint Backlog, or could be more of it… © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 14 Danube Webinar 7
  • 8. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Could also have other Virtual Teams Like Scrum Master Teams. Here’s an example… The SM Team would be there for managing cross-team impediments, and so on This is “Scrum of Scrums” Pattern Project Fury “Project Fury” Project Fury SM Team Management PO Team Team Project Manager: Fiona ScrumMaster: Rob “Tigers” “Bears” “Lions” DevTeam DevTeam DevTeam Team Lead: Tanvi Team Lead: Bhanu Team Lead: Lars ScrumMaster: Joe ScrumMaster: Pavel ScrumMaster: Martin © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 15 The “main” Product Owner Problem Is the person on the team accountable to the business and/or organization for the success of the team, therefore… The ProductOwner has the right to be involved in every decision the team makes, but an obligation not to micromanage; The ProductOwner has veto power at all times, but should control the urge to use it; and The ScrumTeam has the obligation to give the ProductOwner all the information needed to make good decisions. This causes interesting “power dynamics” that the Team/ ScrumMaster must manage… As a part of the Team, the Product Owner usually Acts as “Stakeholder Manager” Prioritizes Stories Does Release Planning Etc… © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 16 Danube Webinar 8
  • 9. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Product Owner Responsibilities Provide Vision, Goals, Direction Drive the Team at a Sustainable Pace Adapt and Release the Product © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 17 Product Owner Responsibilities in Scrum Review Review Review Review & Adapt & Adapt & Adapt & Adapt Startup Release Release Project Activities Sprint Sprint Sprint Sprint Sprint Sprint Visioning Release Release Closeout Planning Planning Activities Project Release Release Start & Project Product Vision Release Goal End Budget Release Baseline Product RoadMap Release Strategy Sprint Goal Product Backlog Release Game Plan Sprint Backlog Provide Vision, Goals, Direction Adapt and Release the Product Drive Team at a Sustainable Pace © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 18 Danube Webinar 9
  • 10. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Three Levels/Layers of Agility Tactical Agility (SM and Team) Inside the Sprint Explaining the “Whats” - Figuring out the “Hows” The SM helps the Team self-organize for this PO (person) is member of team, not PO Low-Level Strategic Agility (PO) On the Sprint Boundaries (and inside the Sprint) Modifying the Backlog Changing sprint goals without changing Release Goals Working with the BO and other Stakeholders Strategic Agility (BO and above) Modify the Release Goals and Product Roadmap Perhaps modify the Product Vision Done if Team isn’t meeting Release Goals… © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 19 Product Owner’s Goal (agile or not) Move the Team along the S-Shaped curve to Release In “standard” PM, the plan is what makes this happen In agility, the PO being smart is what makes this happen "S-Shaped" Curve 1 critical mass point 0.9 Minimally releasable 0.8 Earned Business Value Buffer, 0.7 Nice to haves, 0.6 Rework 0.5 architecturally 0.4 significant Must haves 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 0 20 40 60 80 100 % of Team’s Budgeted Effort © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 20 Danube Webinar 10
  • 11. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Remember… The Product Owner is a member of a self-organizing scrum team There are three types of responsibilities on this team Development Responsibilities ScrumMaster Responsibilities ProductOwner Responsibilities The Scrum Team decides who does what, and each member of the team is accountable to the Scrum Team to do it This means that the ProductOwner may not be the person who actually does all the PO stuff… It’s based on the skills of the people on the team Scrum teams have people with skills, not people playing roles © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 21 Product Owner Responsibilities Provide Vision, Goals, Direction Drive the Team at a Sustainable Pace Adapt and Release the Product © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 22 Danube Webinar 11
  • 12. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Product Owner Challenge To make sure the project produces something of value That it represents the stakeholder’s needs This requires that the Product Owner understand what the Stakeholders want 2 years from now (or the end) Product Vision and Goals Product Roadmap for Development Capabilities and Features Marketing, Sales support Etc That they provide a Release Plan/Strategy That they put together a Backlog for the team And make sure it gets populated with Stories © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 23 Vision Examples Business Vision: I, SirJeff, want to get lots of new customers for my new airline, Royal Catalina Air (so that I can make a lot of money…) Product Vision: In order to get lots of new customers for my airline, I want a website, RoyalCatalinaAir.com, that will be as good as that of “real” airlines © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 24 Danube Webinar 12
  • 13. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Definition/Overview of “Agile Analysis” © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 25 Analysis: Product Capability Story Analysis is primarily about Decomposition Our Product decomposes into Capabilities Capabilities are implemented by doing stories But not all stories are capability-driven Our Project’s work can be seen as a collection of Stories But we’re only going to focus on the capability-driven ones Incremental Analysis is (basically): Find the Capabilities, validate them, then Find the Stories, and validate them Then we use the stories to drive development… Product Capability Story © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 26 Danube Webinar 13
  • 14. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Analysis Concept on One Slide “Connective Tissue” stories Backbone Capability Minimum, Releasable System end-to-end, functionality Demonstrable, Architecturally-Significant Scenario © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 27 Initial Backlog (Epics) Capabilities of CatAir Website [usecase] Buy an e-Ticket [usecase] Check Status of Flights [usecase] Manage Pilot Timesheets [usecase] Hotel and Car Reservations [usecase] Manage “Good Customer” Plan Other Stuff [enviro] Set up Team Room [enviro] Test Lab and Development Environment [maint] Support SouvSite.com © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 28 Danube Webinar 14
  • 15. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Example: Stories for “Buy an e-ticket” Capability [usecase] Buy an e-Ticket Fd Dn Size [backbone] Get List of Flights from CUTLASS (ugly interface) 0 1 L [backbone] Capture Itinerary Information 0 2 L [backbone] Capture Passenger Information 0 2 L Continuous [backbone] Reserve Flight in CUTLASS 0 2 L [alt] Modify CUTLASS to Understand When Flight is Full (note: was awful!) 2 3 L Analysis [analysis] Analysis Meeting with SirJeff 1 3 S [backbone] Pick One Flight and Pay for It (note: stubbed out actual payment) 0 3 L As you move [alt] Handle Round Trip Flights (ugly Interface) 0 3 L [beefup] Hook Up Actual Visa/MasterCard Processing Widget (note: was a PITA) 3 4 L along, you will [backbone] Issue email Confirmation to Customer 0 4 M need to find new [interface] Improve Interface for buying e-ticket 3 4 M [beefup] Close Reservations when Plane is Full (note: turned out to be easy) 0 4 L stories “within” the [alt] Add Payment with PayPal (note: really straightforward) 3 4 M [alt] Reserve Flight to Pay upon arrival at Airport 0 4 M features [alt] Handle multiple-Passenger Parties 0 5 L [interface] Web Interface for Adding/Modifying Flight Info 3 5 L What we see here [beefup] Get Luggage Info, including Scuba Tanks 3 5 L is the list of stories [analysis] Exploratory Testing to "See What's Left" for Buy an e-Ticket 4 5 S [spt] Make sure SirJeff’s Marketing materials have correct information 2 5 S for “Buy an e- [bug] Fix Bug in Luggage Weight Calculations 5 5 S [bug] Fix Small List of Bugs found in Exploratory Testing 5 6 M Ticket” that were [alt] Pay with AMEX 3 M prepared and/or [alt] Bring Pet on Board 5 M [beefup] Special Needs (wheelchair, etc) 5 S implemented in this [alt] Select Seat online [alt] Pay with Coupon 3 3 M M release [beefup] Seat Belt Extender Needed for 'large' Passenger 3 S [beefup] Special Meals 5 S [alt] Change Seat online 3 M [alt] Comfort Seat for 'really large' Passenger 5 S © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 29 Release Planning © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 30 Danube Webinar 15
  • 16. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 What is an Agile Release Plan? SirJeff wants us to release V1 of the website in 3 months (14 weeks). He wants to know what he can tell his marketing and sales folks will be there. In other words, we need a Release Plan An Agile Release Plan is actually a Strategy How Many StoryPoints (SPs) do we have to play with, and how many do we allocate (baseline) to individual features, goals, capabilities? (budget plus shopping list plus strategy) Relying on agility as we go in order to optimize the Business Value (BV) that is produced (what happens when we go to store) NOT a series of Sprint Plans In fact, we don’t want all the stories – lean principle Will do analysis as we go, in parallel, and along with development © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 31 What’s Going On Have a team Transitioning from SouvSite development Half the team for the first 2 sprints Whole team from then on Velocity of 60 SPs/Sprint Expense is 400 Hours/Sprint for the team Have a client, Royal Catalina Airlines (RCA) Royal Catalina Airlines is owned by Sir Geoffrey Smithers (SirJeff) who made a fortune writing software in the Silicon Valley before buying a plane and ferrying tourists up and down the California Coast He is now buying 4 more planes, hiring pilots, crews, etc, and wants a web site, RoyalCatalinaAir.com. We’re writing it for him… © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 32 Danube Webinar 16
  • 17. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Baseline Total Capacity Calculations (budget) We have half the team for the first two sprints We have a Transition sprint, as we bring the rest of team over And then we have four ”full” sprints Joe’s on a Honeymoon sprints 5-6 This is a total of 335 SPs as our baseline SP budget And we “spend” 2820 hours to do it 60 hours/person/sprint Sprint 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total Hours 240 240 480 480 468 432 480 2820 SPs 30 30 45 60 58 52 60 335 © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 33 Goals and Baselines (shopping list) After working with SirJeff and our Team for 2-3 days, we come up with the basics of our Release Plan, as follows… risky Capability/Item BV Baseline Buy an e-Ticket 80% 108SP Investigate CUTLASS interface/capabilities 10SP Investigate the basics of Pilot Timesheets 10% 20SP Check Status of Flights 10% 40SP SouvSite Maintenance (before Release Sprint) 23SP Chores (before Release Sprint) 79SP Release Sprint (includes SouvSite Maint and Chores) 60SP Total 100% 335SP © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 34 Danube Webinar 17
  • 18. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 And we Come Up With a Baseline Game Plan Note that we decomposed the Release Sprint into pieces, too, in order to manage “Release Activities” © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 35 Product Owner Responsibilities Provide Vision, Goals, Direction Drive the Team at a Sustainable Pace Adapt and Release the Product © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 36 Danube Webinar 18
  • 19. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Sprint Planning Meeting Reports/ Daily Standup Metrics/ Impediments Sprint/ Iteration Sprint Planning Increment Sprint of Product Backlog Sprint Review Retrospective Results Backlog © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 37 Purpose of Sprint Planning To come to an “agreement” between the Product Owner and the team To determine which stories will be worked on in the sprint To specify in more detail what each story means so that it can be estimated and so that “scope creep” will be avoided during the sprint This becomes the team’s “contract” for the sprint For the team to decompose the stories to tasks The PO is normally not involved (as the PO) But could be involved as a Team Member © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 38 Danube Webinar 19
  • 20. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Commitment Driven Planning Script 1. Product Owner (with assistance from Team) prioritizes stories in Backlog 2. Team with Product Owner – Add “Agreement” section to highest- priority story remaining on your list 3. Team w/o Product Owner – Break-Out the Story into Tasks 4. Team w/o Product Owner – Decide if you can get that story “done” in the Sprint (“thumbs up” from team) If No, Stop and draw Sprint Backlog line above the story you just Tasked out, but can’t commit to… Note: you can try moving another (smaller) story above the line and going back to step 2 If Yes, Ask the team if it’s “full” If Yes, stop If No, continue at step 2 with next story © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 39 Commit-Driven Planning “in action” Stories Tasks Tasks Completed In Progress Sprint Backlog © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 40 Danube Webinar 20
  • 21. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Stories © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 41 Stories Requests for Valuable stuff... “… are a promise for a future conversation” - Ron Jeffries (from Alistair Cockburn) Have “Doneness” criteria Have Value (not all have Business Value) Have Story Size – I use “t-shirt sizes”, S/M/L, with value 2/4/8 Have Tasks to get them “done” Have Effort (estimated and actual), usually at Task level Different from Requirements: Requirement: “here’s what I want, go do it...” Story: “here’s what I want, let’s talk...” © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 42 Danube Webinar 21
  • 22. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Acceptance Criteria (definition of “done”) © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 43 Iron Triangle and “Doneness” Effort Story Done List ---- Tests to Pass balance Time Boxes -- Inspections Process Reqts Agile Planning is actually about balancing effort, scope, and technical debt The expected scope and debt is seldom documented in detail, but there is a virtual list (which I often like to make explicit) DoneList (acceptance criteria) has two parts Scope Side, usually defined by tests, time boxes, etc Debt Side, usually defined by inspections, process steps, etc The DoneLists have different qualities for different types of stories (storyotypes), and lead to specific tasks to get the DoneList completed” © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 44 Danube Webinar 22
  • 23. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Sample Development Story Get List of Flights from CUTLASS Tasks Size: 8 SPs Type: [backbone] As a <flyer> I want <to have a list of flights that matches my itinerary> so that Architecture <I can choose one that works for me> and Design General: 32 hrs - Joe is the expert on CUTLASS - Simplifying Assumptions: One Way, Single Leg, No Seat Selection, Single Passenger, Full Fare, No Luggage … Write Functional Acceptance: - Pass in an itinerary and get a list of Flights back Tests Doneness: Review Architectural Decisions with Team 12 hrs Design Review Review Functional Test Strategy Review Unit Tests Verify Tests passing on Development Machine Code and Unit Code Review Test Functional Tests Written Verify Tests passing on Integration Box 80 hrs Add Tests to Regression Test Suite © 2009 Doing the Work © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 46 Danube Webinar 23
  • 24. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Sample Task Board © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 47 Sample Task Board (in tool) © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 48 Danube Webinar 24
  • 25. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Team Swarm Stakeholders PO/Analysts Testers To the To The Backlog Product Coders © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 49 Technical Debt © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 50 Danube Webinar 25
  • 26. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 What is Technical Debt? I like to think of Technical Debt as “Viscosity of Code” What makes the code hard to work with “Walk in the Park”, vs “Slog in the Swamp” 22 SP Dead Legacy, Velocity = 0 Story Points Time no © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 51 Avoid Technical Debt Development teams must curb over-optimism in assessing availability and capacity Management redirects attention from applying pressure to removing organizational impediments to progress Product Owners understand the iron triangle, ownership of risks, and impact of cutting quality ScrumMaster must prevent demonstration of any work that is not “done.” Retrospective Issue: “anyone produce any code they’re not particularly proud of?” © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 52 Danube Webinar 26
  • 27. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Product Owner Responsibilities Provide Vision, Goals, Direction Drive the Team at a Sustainable Pace Adapt and Release the Product © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 53 Sprint Review © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 54 Danube Webinar 27
  • 28. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Sprint Review The primary “inspect and adapt” mechanism between the team and stakeholders in scrum is the Sprint Review This Review is the PO’s meeting. In it, the PO is showing the Stakeholders what his/her Team has produced for them, and getting feedback Show the Stakeholders what they need to see so that they can assess whether or not the team is going in the right direction Show the Stakeholders what the Team needs them to see so that the Team knows they are going in the right direction © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 55 Discuss with Stakeholders The Team Does the Demo The Team does the actual work of showing the Stakeholders that “needs to be shown” The Team interacts with the Stakeholders, facilitated by the ScrumMaster and Product Owner PO leads discussion with Stakeholders (often facilitated by ScrumMaster Are we Releasable? What do you want to do next? What should the next Sprint’s Goal(s) be? What do you want to see at the next Sprint Review? © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 56 Danube Webinar 28
  • 29. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 “Hard Core” Metrics for an Agile Project © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 57 How the Release Actually Played Out Sprint 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total Hours 253 233 495 530 467 445 498 2921 SPs 26 32 42 54 66 52 54 326 © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 58 Danube Webinar 29
  • 30. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Release Burnup We are delivering capabilities and Stories But what we are managing is (largely) StoryPoints Correction The BurnUp graph In Sprint 3 shows our production of StoryPoints It shows our SP velocity graphically It shows how many SPs we have “to go” It shows our inventory of SPs that are “ready to go” And it’s easy to calculate © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 59 CPI and SPI for SirJeff This graph shows our SPI and CPI as we move through the sprints The values are calculated cumulatively, not one sprint at a time Sprint 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total Hrs (B) 240 240 480 480 468 432 480 2820 SPs (B) 30 30 45 60 58 52 60 335 Hrs (A) 253 233 495 530 467 445 498 2921 SPs (A) 26 32 42 54 66 52 54 326 © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 60 Danube Webinar 30
  • 31. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Earned Business Value Graphs Correction In Sprint 3 © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 61 Summary © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 62 Danube Webinar 31
  • 32. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 So, to Summarize… The Product Owner is the Team Member who is the "single wringable neck” The Organization “owns” this, not us What the Product Owner does on the team is based on his or her skills and the needs of the team This is a self-organizing team containing people with skills, not people playing roles But, some of the PO responsibilities are best done by the PO All Product Owners are different © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 63 Discussion © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 64 Danube Webinar 32
  • 33. Dan Rawsthorne: Product Owner 12/9/2009 Any Questions? © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 65 Thank You Very Much! © 2009 Product Owner by Dan Rawsthorne 66 Danube Webinar 33